Category Archives: Security

Arctic Chain Hackathon: KnC Builds New Data Center In The Node Pole

Arctic Chain Hackathon: KnC Builds New Data Center In The Node Pole

Arctic Chain Hackathon

Blockchain infrastructure provider KnC today announced plans to build another data center in Boden – the Blockchain computing community within The Node Pole. This was unveiled by CEO Sam Cole during the opening ceremony of the Arctic Chain Hackathon today.

The new data center, which will be KnC’s fourth data center in The Node Pole, is a direct response to a growing market demand, where not only cryptocurrency functions but also a growing number of other blockchain technology applications drives an increasing global market demand for smart and efficient computing capacity – an area where KnC’s combination of smart computing hardware, software models and attractive business applications has led to them dominating in the global market.

The new data center will be located in Boden – the blockchain community within The Node Pole where also Hydro66 is located, and this will be the second mega data center built on the 8000 m2 site where KnC built another center earlier this year – and KnC’s fourth data center in The Node Pole.

With a total capacity of 30 MW, the new center will be utilized mainly for Blockchain security applications utilizing 16 nanometer technology – a sort of unique ‘turbo engine’ for Blockchain computing, vastly more efficient and powerful than other technologies currently available in this market. KnC already today has customers from across the world lined up for taking part in the new services offered using the new data center, and KnC is exclusively relying on locally sprung talent for both building and setting up the new center.

Arctic Chain Hackathon


The new data center plans was unveiled during the opening ceremony of Scandinavia’s first ever blockchain hackathon event – Arctic Chain Hackathon – an event where talent from all around the world are invited and challenged to come up with the best business ideas and coding solutions using blockchain technology.

The new center is another milestone for us going forward, and what better way to unveil this news than in front of these bright minds present here in Boden at the first ever Scandinavian Hackathon. I’m actually hoping to find some people here today to help us in running the new center and coming up with new innovations going forward!” comments Sam Cole – CEO and Co- founder of KnC.

Anne Graf, Investment Director of Sweden’s largest data center cluster The Node Pole – where KnC as well as global cloud computing players such as Facebook and Hydro66 are already embedded – sees today’s news as absolute proof of KnC success, as well as of the bright future of both KnC and the entire cloud computing cluster within The Node Pole.

This is of course great news for KnC, The Node Pole as well as both the Boden municipality and the entire Swedish cloud computing market. KnC continues to prove that they are an integral part of the new digital and intellectual infrastructure that will drive innovation and development over the next decades”, comments Anne.

The new data center news also correlates with a surge in the prospective cloud capacity market, forecasted to double in number of European mega data centers over the next four years. KnC’s new mega data center is scheduled to be operational by early spring 2016.

About KnC

Founded in 2013, KnC is a global technology leader in the Blockchain space, providing efficient, secure and green blockchain power to the world. KnC also has an exceptional track record of delivering next generation ASIC chips to the market. Based in Stockholm, Sweden, KnC develops state-of-the-art chip design and cloud services for blockchain-based applications incl. cryptocurrency mining. KnC also runs industrial-scale operations in other locations globally, with the main focus within the Arctic Circle. Read more at

About The Node Pole

The Node Pole region encompasses four municipalities in the very north of Sweden, just by the Arctic Circle. The cluster is as of today home to ten datacenter (run by Facebook, KnC, Hydro66 and Fortlax among others).The Node Pole also encompasses The Node Pole Alliance: +80 data and datacenter management companies (Schneider Electrics, Cisco, Flextronics, among others) and has numerous global data service clients – as well as joint market and university cloud computing R&D datacenter initiative SICS ICE.

The region has earned the epithet The Node Pole due to its northern position and emergence as a global hub for data traffic and data management innovations. Sweden enjoys one of the lowest electricity pricings in Europe and one of the world’s premiere digital infrastructures and high tech labor forces. The region is one of the most geologically, politically and socially stable areas in the world. Read more at


Competing Cloud Security Demands Call For Credentialed Professionals

Competing Cloud Security Demands Call For Credentialed Professionals

Cloud Security Demands Call For Credentialed Professionals

It is not possible to stare with absolute clarity into the future. None of us has a crystal ball. But there is certainty in knowing that the path to progress on which our future lies curves steeply upwards. Gordon Moore originated a concept, now called Moore’s Law, in 1965. It was intended to describe the constant doubling of processing power in semiconductor chips every two years in an exponential fashion. Although this law was originally designed to describe the progress of computer components, it has subsequently been adapted by numerous futurists to reflect the pace of human technological change in general.


Technologies such as the cloud, mobile devices, and the Internet of Things have not only increased collective processing power, but have also distributed it worldwide so that human beings from every corner of the planet can access and use the technologies. This is good news when efforts are applied to innovation and progress, but not so good news in terms of threats to network security.

Following the upward progression of Moore’s Law, security specialists face an ever-increasing variety and sophistication of attack vectors, happening 24 hours a day and mutating constantly. It becomes increasingly difficult to guard a castle when the attackers are so numerous, agile and versatile, but such is the life of the cloud security professional.

Cat And Mouse With Attackers


For many organizations, IT-related security professionals play a game of cat and mouse with attackers, and this is usually performed in reactive, firefighting mode. At a senior management level, a lack of true understanding of the severity and frequency of attacks, combined with perpetual concerns over costs, have left many organizations understaffed in this area. The problem with this scenario, much like it is in any war, is that strategies cannot be deployed without a higher level vision and a long-range plan. Security specialists who exist purely in firefighting mode represent common foot soldiers, marching or running toward battle but with little overarching strategy of how to outflank the enemies in a more decisive fashion.

Cloud security is a profession that, possibly more than most, cries out for effective time management. Deficiency in this skill is generally not because of any ignorance of its importance, but simply a result of the workload at hand. Most security specialists readily state that given their choice they would prefer to invest a portion of their working time to research, education, and preparedness planning. This, they feel, would lead to far more effective security protocols, both in terms of technological barriers and also in teaching employees the correct techniques and habits for safe computing, password management and general network security hygiene.

Assignment of time in this fashion is an ideal implementation of the Pareto principle, otherwise known as the 80/20 rule, in this case, pointing to the fact that more could be achieved by dividing the workload into two camps: planning and preparedness (20%), and then action and deployment (80%). Only by allowing time for research, review and strategy, can a security professional and the employer gain the upper hand in the constant battle with cloud-based enemies.

Malware Fridays

A simple example of the strategic clarity that the 80/20 principle can deliver is the Friday effect. Network security company Cyren pointed out recently that Fridays are the most dangerous days for the delivery of malware.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

This is predicated on the fact that employees prefer to take their devices home with them for the weekend, and consequently turn to less-than-secure Wi-Fi connections for doing work and returning emails. When employees work outside a secure firewall, cyber criminals can exploit this weakness, leading people to unwittingly download malware, which is then reinserted into a company’s network upon their return to work on Monday. This type of strategy, which may appear fiendishly straightforward, has a pattern that can best be perceived through a higher level view, and is not available to be picked up by security specialists already overwhelmed by immediate crises.

Seeking Certified Professionals

As companies invest in cloud security, they should be seeking certified professionals, such as the Certified Cloud Security Professional (CCSP℠) from (ISC)2®, a global leader in information, cyber, software and infrastructure security certifications, who have the demonstrated experience, knowledge and skills to competently address the many challenges of this role – from reacting to threats to ongoing maintenance of secure cloud infrastructure to communicating effectively with business leaders. This is a lot to ask of any individual and, similarly, it is a lot to ask of a company: allowing time for the expert to prepare for the future while battling the present. It requires resources, and senior-level commitment.

The one constant, however, is that this will not change. In fact, it will only increase. A certified cloud security professional is there to establish and maintain appropriate defenses so organizations can benefit from the full power of cloud computing to grow their business.

For more on the CCSP certification from (ISC)2 please visit their website. Sponsored by (ISC)2.

By Steve Prentice

‘Tis The Season To Be Deploying Sensors

‘Tis The Season To Be Deploying Sensors

Deploying Sensors

Overhead the Christmas Drones are buzzing, delivering packages to the good girls and boys. Back at the main location people are analyzing the good and bad data collected over the year about each person. Data analytics that is creating a list, gathering all the data and then checking the data on that list (Twice). In the end to produce two lists. The good list of kids. The bad list of kids. I am pretty sure I am on the bad list, again.


Cyber Physical Systems Wishlist

It is the season of giving. So far this year I’ve gotten two colds and a wooden Jaguar. Needless to say I kept the Jaguar (it is actually quite nice) and have done my best to get rid of the colds. I decided to share my wish list for Cyber Physical Systems for the next year to help spread the Christmas cheer!

1. Other than my two front teeth I also want Cyber Physical System device security. Replaceable security modules that can be quickly replaced without requiring the organization replace the entire CPS device.

2. A bicycle and Cyber Physical System data management. Perhaps a standard for and support of on device data, cached data, data in transit and also data on that cell phone in your pocket.

3. Please don’t bring me ghosts again Santa, five years in a row is enough. Beyond no ghosts I would also like to see a Cyber Physical Systems integration standard. The growing number of CPS devices deployed make it really hard to integrate everything. Going forward the value of integration for the devices will be critical.

It’s a short list and frankly I hope to get all of them by the end of the year. The concept of replaceable security modules within CPS devices is a great opportunity. That way you won’t have to replace your CPS devices as security standards change. You just replace the security hardware.


CPS or the more consumer Internet of Things (IoT) represents a growing number of systems. As more and more of these devices are deployed the opportunity for a single unified management standard will be of significant value. A unified management protocol and standard would allow organizations to implement devices knowing they can quickly connect and manage them!

The next concept is that of integration is critical for CPS. Today there are 10 billion devices in the world. They offer services, data and connection in any number of ways. A standardized approach to integrating all these devices will be a great present.

Santa knows the value of CPS and supply chain management. I suspect if you asked him what his holiday list was about it would be just that. Taking the integration framework and management framework and applying that to the entire supply chain. Know where your parts are at all times. Create a JIT (Just-in-Time) supply chain that doesn’t have parts paid for and waiting for parts that are delayed or still in transit. Have a system where the parts arrive and are paid for at the same time. Reduce the time from ordering parts to selling your system by managing where parts are in the system and when they will be in your facility. I think Santa would like such a system. I might even get off the naughty list.

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

By Scott Andersen

Cloud Pinup: Jukedeck – A.I. Based Music Creator

Cloud Pinup: Jukedeck – A.I. Based Music Creator

Cloud Pinup: Jukedeck

Think of that beautiful piece of video you shot over the weekend. Wouldn’t it sound better with a piece of music to go with it? Of course it would. How long is the video? What style do you want it to be and how do you want it to make you feel? Uplifting folk music that finishes in 1 minute and 5 seconds? No problem. Click here and.…hang on…there’s your track. Original, made-to-order music delivered via the cloud and ready to be added to any platform you want.

Rights-free, original music at just the touch of a button.

That’s exactly what the folks at Jukedeck, a London-based startup, have just released, and if they’ve read the market correctly then they’re about to solve the problem of struggling to get music rights to a song or spending hours sifting through stock music folders to find the right kind of aural accompaniment. This is software as a service for the millennial, content-creating generation.


It’s an intriguing notion and one that could find a receptive market for people who don’t have the time, energy or expertise to source a great soundtrack that can be uploaded with all its rights intact onto YouTube. Already Jukedeck claims that over 100 000 tracks have been recorded in 85 countries and it’s music has featured on clips with over 16 million views on YouTube.

You can try the software right here and right now with this link.

The company is the brainchild of Ed Rex and Patrick Stobbs, two Cambridge students who loved music and machine learning. The startup just launched its first product Jukedeck MAKE at TechCrunch Disrupt in London to solid acclaim and has closed a £2 Million round of funding ($3 Million USD), led by Cambridge Innovation Capital. At the heart of the system is machine learning, the effective use of artificial intelligence to create tailored, original music.

Producing On The Fly

The company has set its sights on the growing world of online video and its a huge market where anyone with a smartphone can produce and upload a broadcast-quality piece of video. YouTube is the industry leader and a 21st Century juggernaut but Facebook, Instagram and every other online site is increasingly moving towards the moving image. “300 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute, a number that’s trebled in the last two years,” they explain. “In addition more TV content and advertisements are being produced than ever before. And all this content needs music.”

The company estimates that the market for music for video is already worth US$2 billion and growing all the time. Of course, music is not only created for video. Think retail, training modules, gaming, all platforms which benefit from the addition of rights-free music.

Music & SaaS Evolution

The unique selling point here is the fact that machine-learning has enabled that music to be original. Music has been evolving into a SaaS business for some time now. The advent of streaming services like Spotify and Apple Music ensure that the storage capabilities of the cloud and the slick delivery of content to users is central to the continued use of the product. As TechCrunch explained in its story on “The SaaSing of the Music industry’, “the streaming services also have to play the SaaS game to ensure subscribers don’t churn and join other streaming services. In many respects, the artists themselves become creative talent for iTunes, Spotify and others, much like engineers and product developers are the rock stars behind other SaaS providers, such as Uber and Airbnb.”

Jukedeck is a logical next step in that evolution and will provide a neat solution for thousands of amateur videographers looking to get better quality content online.

By Jeremy Daniel

DRaaS: Can Make Providers Life Easier

DRaaS: Can Make Providers Life Easier

DRaaS Planning

Earlier in Part 1 this week we’ve touched on “What Is DRaaS?”. Now we will explore this a little further. 

Disaster recovery situations are always high pressure, stressful affairs which require cool heads and excellent planning. What can service providers of DRaaS to do to make life easier for their customers and to plan ahead for any eventuality which might occur?

Let’s explore a few ideas in Part 2 of our analysis of the Disaster Recovery Software industry.

Firstly, it is a proven fact that the more you test your disaster recovery plan, the more likely it is to work when you need it to. So, allow us to test our disaster recovery whenever we want and stop charging us for it. The main reasons for not testing disaster recovery are the costs involved and the lack of time to run proper tests. By making the test free, you immediately eliminates one of the barriers. We could take that one step further. Let the cloud service provider offer to run the disaster recovery tests for the client and report back the results for a fee. Here’s a good article on the overall benefits of DRaaS.

Mission Critical


DRaaS providers have copies of our servers already, so why not leverage those copies for making off-site backups? Many companies are required to maintain off-site backup copies of their data. Being able to leverage your DRaaS for these backups would be of great help. Not only would it offload backup services from your network and save you time, but you would eliminate the performance hit your network takes during these backup windows. Now I realize most companies do not have all their servers under a DRaaS contract, usually just the mission critical systems, but these are precisely the systems usually most important to have backup copies off-site for.

Provide us with a means to access the applications at the disaster recovery site in an effective and productive manner. As companies move to SaaS-based application delivery, the problem of application access during a disaster is eliminated. SaaS application are accessed via a browser easily from any computer. Not all applications are offered via SaaS or have been implemented with a browser front-end. For those applications not accessed via SaaS, a “thin client solution’’ is required to access these applications during a disaster. For companies not already using a thin client solution to deploy applications, having to install one specifically for disaster recovery is an expensive proposition.


What if the DRaaS provider could offer thin client services as part of their disaster recovery offering? Better yet, they could only charge for the thin client infrastructure and licensing when you declare a disaster. That would really add value to the solution.

Failover And DRaaS

Finally, the most important addition that could be made to a DraaS is the ability to provide near instant server failover for a production server. How many times has a server failed or become corrupted during business hours, causing an outage that could have been avoided. With the size of today’s servers and growing quantities of data, it is not improbable for a single server restore to take 8 or more hours. During the restore process the server and applications it serves are unavailable. Imagine if that failed server was part of your disaster recovery plan and you could instantly fail-over to the corresponding server at the disaster recovery location. Granted, performance may be impacted but at least the server and applications would be available while the production issue is addressed. The DraaS offering could turn into a passive secondary data center solution for the cost of disaster recovery. This would be a tremendous value-add and is possible to deliver with a little extra work by the cloud providers.

As we can see, DraaS is now available to all enterprises regardless of size thanks to the new market of cloud providers. Now, let’s push these providers to take it to the next level and add more value to the offering and solve some real pain points of the IT community.

By Marc Malazia

Principles For Data Protection In The Cloud In 2016

Principles For Data Protection In The Cloud In 2016

Data Protection In The Cloud

2015 ushered in the start of a data economy. As organizations amass more detailed consumer profiles they have begun realizing that data could equal or surpass the value of the products and services they sell, especially in the Internet of Things era with its constant and very personal streams of data. Data breaches such as the Office of Personal Management and toymaker, VTech are indicative of increasing hactivist interest in more personal data and also of the growing value of that data.


At the same time the concept of cloud is changing. In our hyper connected era traditional backend clouds where the bulk of data processing takes place have been superseded by waves of cloud migration that are closer to where the data transaction is occurring. This allows for real-time data exchanges.  Additionally, the lines between SaaS, PaaS and IaaS are becoming blurred with hybrid models such as SaaS built upon PaaS.  With the confluence of a data economy, blurring of cloud models, and far more egregious data breaches I have outlined principles that Information Security Practitioners may want to consider as we move into 2016.

1. Bake standard data security profiles into a cloud brokerage platform that can be applied on as needed consumption basis.  This will more easily allow IT and InfoSec to keep pace with new instantiations by the business across the cloud-extended data center.

2. Place increasing importance on federated identity schemes with individuals having multiple devices across different cloud services.

3. Build a data brokerage to help calculate the value of data.  It’s the most effective way for business users to learn the value of the data they create, collect or handle.

Protect data according to the following domains:


Data Classification

  • State data classification in business consumable terms if you want business users to own up to protecting data according to its business risk.
  • Leverage machine learning for dynamic data classification as data changes value over the course of its lifecycle.

Data Ownership

  • Where possible digitally tag or watermark data that is transacted, stored or processed with a cloud provider.  This minimizes confusion around data ownership and entitlement rights.

Data Protection and Lifecycle Management

  • Ensure policy management extends to access management at the various admin layers for the cloud provider as well as for the elements of the cloud stack you as an organization have control over.
  • Enable data owners to specify what actions users can take– read, write, copy, modify.
  • Ensure that data lifecycle management – creation, modification, retention, destruction is built into your policies.
  • Set encryption settings – key strength and key management parameters based on data sensitivity.
  • Continuously log all actions based on the context of who, what when and where.

By Evelyn de Souza

How Your Startup Can Benefit From Cloud Computing And Growth Hacking

How Your Startup Can Benefit From Cloud Computing And Growth Hacking

Ambitious Startups

An oft-quoted statistic, 50% of new businesses fail within five years. And the culling of startups is even more dramatic, with an estimated nine out of ten folding. But to quote Steve Jobs, “I’m convinced that about half of what separates the successful entrepreneurs from the non-successful ones is pure perseverance.” So while there are a few must-have ingredients such as products that work as they should, products that perform as they’re required to, products that people want, and businesses that are able to deliver, there are also a few generic tricks that every business can use to aid and promote success.


Take Advantage of the Cloud

Cloud computing enables startups to scale and grow easily, providing access to services and products previously in reach and budget only of well-established businesses.

  • Save Money: With the cloud, you can do more for less and spend the money you’ve saved on licensing fees developing your business.
  • Flexibility & Scalability: Start small to keep down costs, and when necessary, add required services or rescale appropriately. Cloud computing not only makes this possible but seamlessly so.
  • Reliability & Support: Top cloud computing providers offer user-friendly interfaces and reliable infrastructure providing startups with professional systems that would otherwise take years to develop and implement.
  • Go Mobile: No one said entrepreneurship was a walk in the park. Cloud services keep you mobile, so you’ve got access to your startup 24/7. Weddings, family holidays, and New Year’s Eve Parties: Prime time to check your mail, address customer concerns, and fine tune your product.

Go Viral


Once you’ve scrounged every last cent, carefully streamlined your business processes, and developed the perfect product, you need to get it to market. And not just any market either. Precisely targeting potential users and getting known can be cheaply, often freely, achieved with a few simple growth hacks.

  • Referral Programs: Offering product upgrades or exclusive content to users who encourage others to take up your product creates a base of cheap and impartial sales reps who actually believe in the product they’re selling.
  • Exclusivity: Everyone wants what they can’t have. Pinterest took advantage of this fact by starting out as an invitation-only platform, and creating a buzz with a waiting list for access which led to prospective users believing they needed to be part of the trend. Exclusivity effectively hacks human nature to drive growth.
  • Free Stuff: Human nature is, of course, irrational. We also all love free stuff. Giving users something for free is a quick way of both increasing product usage and improving popularity.

There is a range of tools available for startups, including free services and funding foundations. A few providers also offer incubator programs that encourage and facilitate startups with free infrastructure and tools. For more, take a look at SoftLayer’s Catalyst Startup Program, MassChallenge’s Startup Accelerator, or Boston’s startup incubator Blade.

By Jennifer Klostermann

The Surge Pricing Model And Free Market Economics

The Surge Pricing Model And Free Market Economics

From Surge Pricing To Surge Payments

In a very short period of time, Uber has emerged as a world-changing business philosophy that goes well beyond cars. It represents a new approach to crowdsource-based, on-demand service. It is changing the way companies look at the delivery of goods, in terms of direct delivery to a customer as well as to and from warehouses. It has already profoundly impacted the taxi industry, which has reacted with fear and anger at this brash new competitor, and which, in some cities at least, has already resulted in a lowering of base fares and an improved level of service. That’s what competition does.


(Image Source: MikeDotta / Shutterstock)

As with many innovations, the Uber approach to individualized service is still developing. There are wrinkles yet to be ironed out, either by Uber or its own direct competitors, and one of these is the idea of surge pricing. Uber’s detractors have pointed to the free-market approach to pricing that Uber’s services seem to have demonstrated in times of great demand. Although Uber itself has commented on this, there is a simple fact to remember: Uber is not the only game in town. Customers are not obliged to pay any form of surge pricing due to some transit monopoly; there are other forms of transport always available.

The surge pricing model is a facet of free market economics, whether embraced by Uber or not. Any company that invokes it simply capitalizes on the fact that services have a value, and many factors, including convenience, status, or scarcity tend to raise that value, even if temporarily.

Traditional Payment Systems

So what happens when the Uber model gets applied to more traditional payment systems, like the net-30 or net-60 invoice payment structure? This multi-week delay between receipt of an invoice and the cutting of a cheque is central to the operations of many organizations in both the public and private sector. Many organizations base their cash flow and projections on this buffer, ensuring they reduce or eliminate exposure between input of revenue and outflow of expenses. For the last few decades there really has been no other way – at least any that are acceptable to the accounting department.

But in the age of Uber, this is changing. Some companies are starting to recognize that they can pay suppliers through credit card and PayPal, through electronic funds transfer, even using BitCoin, and they can do so within one hour or even one minute of receiving the invoice. The question is, why would any company want to do that, when they can hang on to their money for another month or more by staying with the traditional procedure?

Priorities Based On Immediacy Of Payment

The answer lies in Uber’s approach, which is simply a speeded up version of any free marketplace: you get what you pay for. Suppliers of goods and professional services may reconsider their business priorities based on immediacy of payment. They may simply become unavailable to any organization that cannot pay within minutes of delivery or completion.


This, then is not an immediate copy of surge pricing, since prices for the services have not increased, but it definitively points to an increase in overall cost to the buyer, when the most efficient – and therefore ultimately most economical – suppliers bow out of the supply chain in favor of more prompt-paying customers. The cost to a purchasing organization might not be in up-front dollars, but in the elimination of the ideal supplier.

This is already happening, and it promises to only increase. As companies seek to improve their productivity and competitiveness in line with the changing mobile-first economy, some of the more traditional aspects of running a business get left behind or taken for granted as the perpetual norm. However, in just the same way that Uber has shaken up the century-old world of taxis-for hire, the speed of payment ideal will change the traditional business-to-business playing field, modifying the value definition of a supplier to factor in its willingness to sell in real time versus the customer’s willingness to pay in real time. This must become part of any organization’s next five-year plan. The quality that they themselves seek to deliver to their customers will be entirely dependent on the quality of the suppliers with whom they work. And just like in the taxi industry, there are always other, cheaper resources available. The question is, will they take your company where it wants to go?

This post is sponsored by KPMG LLP and The CIO Agenda.

KPMG LLP is a Delaware limited liability partnership and is the U.S. member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. The views and opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of KPMG LLP.

By Steve Prentice

CloudTweaks Comics
Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Security, Security, Security!! Get use to it as we’ll be hearing more and more of this in the coming years. Collaborative security efforts from around the world must start as sometimes it feels there is a sense of Fait Accompli, that it’s simply too late to feel safe in this digital age. We may not…

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

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Update: Timeline of the Massive DDoS DYN Attacks

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The DDoS Attack That Shook The World

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5 Ways To Ensure Your Cloud Solution Is Always Operational

5 Ways To Ensure Your Cloud Solution Is Always Operational

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3 Keys To Keeping Your Online Data Accessible

3 Keys To Keeping Your Online Data Accessible

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Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

The Legal Battle For Privacy In early June 2013, Edward Snowden made headlines around the world when he leaked information about the National Security Agency (NSA) collecting the phone records of tens of millions of Americans. It was a dramatic story. Snowden flew to Hong Kong and then Russia to avoid deportation to the US,…

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

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Maintaining Network Performance And Security In Hybrid Cloud Environments

Maintaining Network Performance And Security In Hybrid Cloud Environments

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Your Biggest Data Security Threat Could Be….

Your Biggest Data Security Threat Could Be….

Paying Attention To Data Security Your biggest data security threat could be sitting next to you… Data security is a big concern for businesses. The repercussions of a data security breach ranges from embarrassment, to costly lawsuits and clean-up jobs – particularly when confidential client information is involved. But although more and more businesses are…

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

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Hybrid-Cloud Approach For over 20 years, organizations have been attempting to secure their networks and protect their data. However, have any of their efforts really improved security? Today we hear journalists and industry experts talk about the erosion of the perimeter. Some say it’s squishy, others say it’s spongy, and yet another claims it crunchy.…


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