Category Archives: Security

Customer Success Guidelines – In A World Gone Cloud

Customer Success Guidelines – In A World Gone Cloud

Customer Success Guidelines for Maximum Upselling and Cross-Selling in a World Gone Cloud

With the growth of the subscription economy, companies can no longer assume that a sale means that the deal is closed. Companies need to prove their worth every minute of every hour, every hour of every day and so on. A big part of proving your company’s worth is ensuring customer success, which could make the difference between a consumer being open to upselling and cross-selling or not. Maximizing upselling and cross-selling is one of the most effective ways to ensure profitability. This is because most SaaS revenue generation occurs after the initial subscription process.


So without further delay, here are key guidelines to maximize your upselling and cross-selling capabilities.

  1. Examine the Basics: Ensure That Your Product and Your Customer are a Good Match.

Customer Success starts with good market research. If your product is not a good fit with the customer segment you are trying to appeal to, you will never be successful. Ensure that your product, support infrastructure, company culture, philosophies, and services are a good fit with your customer. If the customer base does not click it is unlikely that the user will have a good experience. 39% of customers say that the #1 cause of churn is that customer expectations were not met. Facilitating customer success through understanding your ideal market segment provides an ideal opportunity for upselling and cross-selling.

  1. Provide Great Support Through the Entire Customer Lifecycle.

Though the initial onboarding phase of the product is definitely the most support-intensive, it is important to ensure that the customer has access to great support all along the way. Providing your customer base with online tutorials, live chat and webinars will ensure that adequate and appropriate support is at their fingertips. Doing so will minimize frustration, and ensure that the user experience is enriching and engaging. This will increase the chance that the customer will be open to upselling and cross-selling.  Gartner recommends employing user experience design techniques and practices to better engage portal users. 

  1. Use Metrics, but More Importantly Review and Refresh Your Metrics

We all use metrics to see where our product falls short. Tracking user interactions will reveal causes of churn and allow you to address them before they become a problem. This is why it is important to be critical of your metrics. Review your measuring system on an ongoing basis. Do not be afraid to adjust it. You have everything to gain from an increasingly effective methodology.

  1. Think Cross Selling and Upselling from Day One

Keeping the end goal in mind is a life lesson we all aspire to live by. Customer success is no exception. The roots of churn are often found in the initial engagement phase of a sale. Ensure that your onboarding processes are efficient and quickly move customers from the learning phase to the point where they are receiving value from your product. Showing the consumer how to obtain the full value of your product early on, will lay the groundwork for upselling when they reach the point where their needs grow past what the product can offer. Frustrated customers are not only unlikely to renew their subscription, but may also have negative things to say about your product and affect other users.

Upselling and Cross-Selling cannot occur unless the customer is set up for success. Ensuring that the product suits consumer needs, is backed by adequate support, constantly improving, and elicits a positive customer experience helps guarantee future profitability.

  1. Do not Be Afraid of New Technologies. Investigate!

Remember why you came out with your product or solution in the first place? It was probably to make someone’s work more efficient, productive etc. If you sell technology to improve your customers’ work or life, why shy away from using technology to help you sell more and ensuring customer success?

There are a lot of solutions out there that support customer success. Whether it is a great analytics platform, onboarding tool, or onscreen guidance and engagement, it is all there. Stay updated and investigate technologies that can elevate your solution’s user experience and make sure that it is the easiest, most intuitive, contextual and simple. That way your users will be much more receptive to your upselling and cross selling efforts.

By Boaz Amidor

Why You Should Be Concerned About Drone Security

Why You Should Be Concerned About Drone Security

Why You Should Be Concerned About Drone Security

Over the past decade, drones, also known as UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles), have become a fact of life. Beginning as underpublicized but extremely effective items in the U.S. military’s arsenal, drones have since come into wide use by government agencies for everything from geographic surveys to law enforcement.

Now there is a significant commercial industry manufacturing drones for private use. Correspondingly, there is a growing market for unmanned aircraft of all sizes, shapes, and types among corporations, hobbyists, and other individuals. It is these commercial drones that are increasingly taking to the American skies, and that are creating growing concerns about the threat they pose to personal security.

One Person’s Snapshot Is Another’s Invasion of Privacy 


Although militaries around the world do employ weaponized UAVs, the vast majority of drones used by public agencies, corporations, and private individuals are engaged in photography and remote visual surveillance. While there are real worries about the hazards untracked, unregulated, or malfunctioning drones may pose to manned aircraft or to persons and property on the ground, by far the greatest concern is about the effect they are having on privacy.

Property boundaries, walls, fences, and even rows of trees offer no protection against photography from drones, which can hover at a medium height just beyond a property line, recording and transmitting everything that they see. Even second-story windows easily fall in a drone’s line of sight.

It is not just celebrities that are worried about paparazzi-controlled UAVs buzzing low over their Malibu mansions. Less public individuals also have real reasons to be concerned that law firms, insurance companies, private investigators, or nosy neighbors might use drones to peer into places only family and invited guests used to be able to access.

How Can Drone Security Be Established? 


Providing security against drones is a real challenge. Solutions to the threats drones pose are slowly being developed, although there is currently no foolproof protection. Indeed, even individuals who stay indoors with the shades drawn can still be tracked by infrared cameras that detect their heat signatures.

Some property owners have attempted to shoot down drones. This course of action is not particularly effective, and is liable to land the property owner in serious trouble with the law.

Another, more feasible solution is the development of electronic systems that detect the transmissions that pass back and forth between a UAV and its controller. The detector then alerts the property owner to a drone’s proximity, providing him or her with some opportunity to take cover.

More effective provisions for drone security might come from standards adopted by drone manufacturers. One possibility is that the drone manufacturing industry will incorporate navigation chips in drones that recognize areas registered on a “do not overfly list.” Property owners could register their homes on a list, and drones would be unable to pass within a certain distance of their property.

Stringent regulation of drones by local, state, and federal government would provide another measure of security for individuals, but effective statutes are still being developed. Until such laws are passed and enforced, drone security will remain a wide-open field.

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

By Glenn Blake

Big Tech Trends For The 21st Century

Big Tech Trends For The 21st Century

Tech Trends For The 21st Century

When the historians of the future look back on the 21st century, what will they say? Inevitably, the biggest stories in the coming century will be political and environmental – wars, revolutions, and natural disasters always dominate historical memory. But perhaps more than any previous epoch, the 21st century will also be defined by its technology. If the Internet was the culmination of the 20th century, what will its equivalent be in the next century?

Internet of Things

Perhaps the most discussed innovation of the 21st century is the Internet of Things. Since its inception, the Internet has been used to link computers, servers, and (recently) mobile devices. But we are just beginning to see the rise of a new internet – one that pervades everyday objects and allows them to communicate with standard Internet-equipped devices. For example, many standard car models already have the capacity to run internal diagnostics and send the results to the owner via email. When it’s time to change the oil, the car can inform the owner automatically. And as this technology improves, the online interaction between vehicle and owner will only get more complex, perhaps to the point that drivers will be able to analyze their own habits in order to find more efficient routes, avoid driving during peak hours, etc.


Of course, the Internet of Things will not be limited to cars. Imagine a refrigerator that could automatically scan the barcode of any item placed inside and store attributes like weight, expiration date, and frequency of use. A smartphone app could inform shoppers that they are almost out of milk, or that the jar of hummus they bought last week is about to spoil.



Within the Internet of Things, we can expect that wearable technology will be some of the most important of all the interconnected objects. In addition to vehicles and appliances, human beings will also be outfitted with a variety of sensors that constantly collect data and relay it through the Internet of Things. This sort of wearable technology is already transforming the clothing and fitness world, with FitBit and other similar products monitoring steps, heart rate, body temperature, and various other physical attributes that might be relevant for the user’s exercise regime. The recently released Apple Watch promises to bring an even greater level of interconnectivity through wearable technology – if it’s anywhere near as successful as the iPhone, the Apple Watch will be ubiquitous within just a few years, and millions of people will be able to analyze data on their physical stats and daily habits with the click of a button or the tap of a touchscreen.

Big Data

But all this data doesn’t just sit in a vacuum, and it will not stay solely in the user’s control (at least not for long). It’s far too valuable for that. All these sensors and data-collecting devices will gather a wealth of information on human behavior that will be profoundly valuable to marketers, governments, and social scientists alike. Tech giants like Facebook and Google are already capitalizing on the profusion of personal data and constantly finding new ways to monetize users’ information. Imagine how much more information will be available once people adopt smart cars, smart refrigerators, smart watches, and other Internet of Things innovations become commonplace. Balancing all this data against the need for personal privacy will be one of the most profound political challenges of the 21st century.


Nothing is ever certain in the tech industry – indeed, in this dynamic field the only predictable constant is the constancy of change. But the 21st century, already 1/6 of the way over, is beginning to show its direction through the rapid growth of Big Data, wearable technology, and the Internet of Things.

By Brent Anderson

Tips For Data Security In The Cloud

Tips For Data Security In The Cloud

Security In The Cloud

How can you be completely confident that the information you are storing or have already stored in the cloud is safe? The answer to this is — you can’t. However, you can adopt certain protective measures that will surely help find the answer. In this article, I have listed some approaches that can be followed to secure your data, access and network in the cloud.

Secure access control to your data in the cloud

Access control is usually made up of two parts:

1) Authentication: At this phase, only those users are given authority who they claim to be. This verification is possible through password checking.

2) Authorization: It gives access to no matter what authenticated user is authorised to. The first and foremost step is to achieve security in the cloud by knowing who’s accessing what. All people working inside your organisation i.e., database administrators and employees will obtain an advanced stage of scrutiny; receive training on firmly managing data; and come up with a stronger access control.

Also, limit the data access control according to the user context. Through this, you can achieve the change in level of accessing data in the cloud depending upon where the user is and what device is he/she been using.

Take a risk-based approach to secure assets: A risk-based approach to secure assets means adopting pro-active measures by interconnecting otherwise silo-based security and IT tools, continuously monitoring and assessing the data. In turn, the organisation can achieve a closed-loop and automated remediation process that is based on risk. Risk-based approach comes up with three major elements: continuous compliance, continuous (security) monitoring, and closed-loop, risk-based remediation.

  • Continuous compliance:

It involves reconciliation of assets along with automation of data classification, alignment of technical controls, automation of compliance testing, deployment of assessment surveys, and automation of data consolidation. When any organisation conducts continuous compliance, it helps in reducing overlap by leveraging a common control framework, increases accuracy in data collection and data analysis, and reduces redundant as well as manual, labour-intensive efforts by up to 75 per cent.

  • Continuous (security) monitoring:

It comes up with an increased frequency of data assessments particularly on a weekly basis and requires security data automation by aggregating and normalising data from a variety of sources such as SIEM, asset management, threat feeds, and vulnerability scanners. In turn, organisations can reduce costs by unifying solutions, streamlining processes, creating situational awareness to expose exploits and threats in a time-bound manner, and gathering historic trend data for the predictive security.

  • Closed-loop, risk-based remediation:

A closed-loop, risk-based remediation process involves asset classification to define business criticality, continuous scoring to enable risk-based prioritisation, and closed-loop tracking and measurement. This process results in dramatically increase in operational efficiency, improves collaboration between businesses, security, and IT operations, and enables organisations to measure security efforts and make them tangible.

All these approaches identify databases by means of extremely sensitive or valuable data, and take care by providing extra protection, encryption and monitoring around them. Implementing these approaches within your organisation, you will be capable of protecting all essential systems as well as assets from the attack. You can even authorise the access to infrastructure and data.

Extend security to the device:


Shoulder-to-shoulder with access limitation, your data calls for the variable levels of protection. Organisations holding sensitive data should be protected by making use of encryption along with the additional monitoring. Encryption can provide you relief from the interference problems caused by illegal users. In the same manner, personal devices that are used for accessing cloud data should bring forth the corporate data isolation. These devices should make full use of Patch Management Software that keep programs up-to-date and scan all mobile applications from any kind of vulnerabilities.

Add intelligence to network protection:

Network protection devices should have the ability to deliver additional control analytics and have an insight control through which the check can be made on which users are accessing what content and applications. This will serve as a helping hand in assembling the intelligence that is required to see patterns even in the chaos.

Adding intelligence to network mitigates the risks with real-time situation awareness of network activity and critical transparency to allay fears of potential customers. You can protect network by hardening network security to restrict data leakage or data theft. You can also audit trails of all network transaction — communication and content — related to a customer’s account, assuming compliance to regulation and standards.

Establish ability to see through the cloud:


Security devices, like those used for verifying users IDs and passwords, for acquiring security data to create audit trail are needed for monitoring compliance and forensic investigation. The basic idea behind all is to find out essential and meaningful signals regarding a possible attack or security risk in the briny deep sea of data points.

Adding a security intelligence layer i.e., layer of advanced analytics helps in bringing about all of security data together. This helps in providing a real-time visibility into both the data centre as well as the cloud infrastructure.


Along with the above mentioned approaches, there are many others that a business can take into consideration in order to strengthen their data protection policy. Regular evaluation of your business security policies will ensure you are not leaving an “open door” for hackers to enter. Security plays a vital role in cloud deployments. By following these approaches, an organisation can be managed more efficiently, for these will completely protect data as well as devices in the cloud.

By Sudhi Seshachala

Simple And Recommended SaaS Security Tips

Simple And Recommended SaaS Security Tips

SaaS Security Tips

Most people and companies are now using a significant amount of SaaS solutions. Companies are running sales support software, they are file sharing, collaborating and using e-mail programs and a lot more in the cloud. However, that usage also leads to concerns about the security of those solutions. How safe are they? What risks do we run?

Here are a couple of tips to increase the security of SaaS applications.


By far, the biggest risks to using SaaS are leaking data and losing control. The top way to control these risks is simple: watch your passwords, and know how to survive a cloud provider exit. If you look at famous data breaches in the past year, of which the iCloud celebrity hack, (However, still may be dangers) is probably the most well-known, you will see that most breaches were caused by weak passwords and weak password reminders.

Improving the protection that passwords offer is often fairly easy. Security experts recommend using so-called two-factor (or two-step) authentication. This means that you use more than one way to prove your identity at log in. Examples include security tokens, dongles, and fingerprint scanners.

This used to be inconvenient for the user, but in the past few years a number of usable scenarios have been developed. It does not have to be a daily hassle, and you don’t have to fear being locked out.

For example, you can configure your Dropbox account to ask you for an SMS confirmation when you access it on a computer you have not used before. Check it out, they have thought this out well, and there is absolutely no excuse not to use it. You will find it under Account -> Settings -> Security.

Gmail too allows you set up security in this way and once set up, it will alert you to suspicious activity on your account. Like Dropbox, the easiest option is to use your mobile phone, but they also support other methods so there is no need to be concerned if you lose your phone. Other SaaS services that you use might have some of these features as well.

Go explore…

The Administrator


If you are the administrator of a cloud service this is even more important because you will be the prime target of any hacker.  As a cloud service administrator there’s a few other basic things to do. If feasible you should first create a secondary administrator account for day to day work. If that account gets compromised, you will have the first account to fall back on.

Another basic administrator task is to apply hygiene to your user list. Regularly review if users are still active in your company or project, and that they don’t have more rights than they need to have. (In larger organizations this is better done by identity federation, so you don’t have to do this on a service by service basis.) As an administrator, you don’t want former employees or contractors to still have access to your systems.

Access Level


I ran into a simple example the other day on a Google Docs document. It was not mine, but I had full editing access. The person who shared it with me did not need to give me this level of access. It would have been much better just to give me Comment or Review access.

Losing the provider or the data that is stored on the service is the other big risk. And preparing for losing all your data can also protect you against losing some of your data. There are so many reasons why a provider may stop servicing you. They could have any number of technological hiccups, they could suffer a disaster, they could go out of business or they could go in a direction that you don’t like. In all cases it makes sense to have an exit plan or a plan B, such as a plan to move to a different provider.

Backup Is Your Friend

If you don’t have an exit plan, you are basically saying that you accept the risk of losing the data that is with that provider, and the capability to use that data. This could be a valid decision. I am not that interested in my Doodle archive for example, so making a backup of that is not a big concern. At its most basic, an exit plan describes how your most valuable data is stored in a secondary place. For example, my Gmail mail archive is also stored on my laptop as it is automatically downloaded by Outlook, my mail program. I have not spent too much time thinking about changing my mail provider. However,  because my mail and contacts are safely stored elsewhere, I am confident that a new provider will help me to do the migration and that the process will be fairly simple.

For my customer management system I make regular copies of the entire customer database and contact details. Again, moving to a different provider will be a hassle, but not impossible. If your business really depends on it, you may want to have a cloud system on hot standby. However, most of the time, this is not very easy with SaaS because no two SaaS providers are alike.  You are better off to first think about which data to save to a secure location. If and when you want to move, your functional requirements will have changed anyway, and there are likely to be new SaaS providers at that time as well.

For a deeper dive into cloud security issues and controls, have a look at the research that the Cloud Security Alliance is doing.

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

By Peter HJ van Eijk

Cloud Infographic – Path Of A Cyber Attacker

Cloud Infographic – Path Of A Cyber Attacker

Path Of A Cyber Attacker

We’ve covered a fair bit of infosec here on CloudTweaks over the years. It’s an important area for all regardless of if you’re a consumer or a business.

Security expert and consultant – Chetan Soni, discusses some of the security issues and tools to consider as part of your business plan: “Cloud computing has become a business solution for many organizational problems. But there are security risks involved with using cloud servers: service providers generally only take responsibility of keeping systems up, and they neglect security at many ends. Therefore, it is important that clouds are properly penetration (pen) tested and secured to ensure proper security of user data…”

So what is it that cyber attackers really want when invading a cloud network? Well, data really. Anything that can be sold in the underground market such as cloud account credentials, scanned passports and stolen credit card information is just a start for this group.

Attached below is an infographic provided by Symantec which is very telling and frightening of what awaits in this growing underground market.


Here Are Four Ways To Elevate IT

Here Are Four Ways To Elevate IT

Here Are Four Ways To Elevate IT

Prior to joining the consulting side of the industry, I worked in corporate IT for the first 7-8 years of my career. While my time in corporate IT has long come to a close, I can still vividly recall the pain points and dreaded battles I endured.

A recent study confirmed that up to 80 percent of IT budget is allocated to keeping the “lights on.” Such tedious maintenance tasks range from mundane file restoration to the stressful rehabilitation of mission critical server failures.


Here’s the good news: this spending has decreased in recent years as the adoption of cloud technology has increased. Earlier estimates had the cost of IT maintenance at 85% percent from the current 80%, and I anticipate this number will continue to drop. As more companies invest in the cloud and cloud services, budgets for keeping the lights on will shrink, thanks to the cost savings and efficiencies offered by cloud services. To ensure you’re making the most of available budget without spending too much time, or money, I’ve outlined four ways an IaaS provider can help to make tasks that can be very time-consuming with little return, much more efficient:

  1. Hardware & Maintenance—one major cost of IT is server hardware and maintenance. One of the few components left with moving parts, server hardware is prone to wear and tear. As such, there is always the need to allocate large amounts of time dedicated to maintaining these servers to keep everything up and running smoothly. By leveraging an IaaS provider, IT departments instantly offload a huge burden, letting the IaaS provider maintain server hardware, replace bad memory modules or failed drives. Providing a more efficient and low-cost alternative to internal maintenance, IaaS providers can help companies save money and focus their IT efforts elsewhere. Alleviating the bothersome late-night calls/texts when a server fails, employing an IaaS provider is the first step towards IT Utopia.

Disaster recovery

  1. Storage Area Network—another notable IT budget allocation is the storage area network (SAN). A SAN is typically very reliable, but when an issue arises, it usually affects major business critical systems causing mass hysteria in the IT camp. IaaS providers offer storage space for companies to take advantage of. By doing this, you move a very large expense off the maintenance budget while also removing the responsibility of the storage system upkeep and management. You’re now two steps closer to IT Utopia.
  1. System Backup —ensuring that all backup are complete is a tedious, time–consuming task. Between spending the morning sifting through backup logs and rescheduling unsuccessful backups a major chunk of any IT professional’s day. With today’s cloud service options, IaaS providers are able to back up the system they are hosting, which in turn, enables companies to recapture wasted time and move one step closer towards an IT Utopia.
  1. Software Distribution and Maintenance—these are crucial, but also time intensive IT tasks. From deploying a new application to rolling out a new major release of an existing application, distribution is usually a tedious and time consuming task for IT. Software as a Service (SaaS) can help companies minimalize time spent in this area by. SaaS is gaining popularity for many reasons and is a win-win for both IT and the software vendor. SaaS rollout is simple, requiring IT professionals to merely point their users to a URL.

With that said, there is application and user setup that needs to happen as well as potential data migration that needs to occur, but once that is done, the application is now available from any device with a browser with no additional configuration from IT. Users can access the application from any laptop, desktop or smart device without IT intervention.  When a new update comes out, the user will automatically see it the next time they login with no IT intervention.  Many popular SaaS applications are gaining momentum, such as Microsoft Office 365, SAP as well as the market maker, IBM has made a commitment to deliver all its software via a SaaS format over the next few years demonstrating that this will be the method of choice for software delivery in the future. The fourth step towards IT Utopia is now complete.

This discussion demonstrated only four items where Cloud services can be leveraged to minimize the time spent by IT on monotonous, tedious and time-consuming tasks that provide little value to the business.  Cloud services can help companies innovate in leaps and bounds, reducing IT costs and streamlining operations. Furthermore, cloud offerings allow  IT departments to focus on adding value to the business rather than “keeping the lights on,”  thereby attaining a state of IT Utopia.

By Marc Malizia

Docker Secures $95 Million Series D Funding

Docker Secures $95 Million Series D Funding

Docker Secures $95M in Series D Funding to Meet the Unrivaled Demand for Its Open Source Platform  

Burgeoning Ecosystem Standardizes on Docker to Transform How Applications Are Built, Shipped and Run in the Modern Datacenter

SAN FRANCISCO – April 14, 2015 – Docker, Inc., the organization behind the open platform for distributed applications, today announced that it has raised $95 million of Series D funding. This latest infusion builds on the successful Series C round raised in September, and enables Docker to address the needs of the millions of ecosystem users and thousands of enterprises that have standardized on Docker’s technology. The financing will enable deeper integration with go-to-market partners such as AWS, IBM and Microsoft, who have made strategic product investments in support of Docker’s open source technology. It will also fuel new platform capabilities across the application development lifecycle, solidifying Docker as the foundation for a new generation of distributed applications.

The round was led by Insight Venture Partners, with new contributions from Coatue, Goldman Sachs and Northern Trust. Existing investors Benchmark, Greylock Partners, Sequoia Capital, Trinity Ventures and Jerry Yang’s AME Cloud Ventures also participated in the round.

This financing is a strong vote of confidence in Docker management, and strengthens the company’s ability to fulfill the needs of the millions of developers who have made the commitment to utilizing its breakthrough products and services in their daily work,” said Jeff Horing, co-founder of Insight Venture Partners. “Docker will be able to continue to make additional hires in general to put more critically-needed products into the hands of developers.”

Docker’s model enables any application to be built and run as a consistent, low-overhead Docker container, liberating developers from infrastructure concerns and dramatically increasing innovation. Enterprises using Docker have reported that it shrinks deployment cycles from weeks to minutes and drives up to 20X improvement in computing resource efficiency. More than 300 million instances of Docker’s technology have been downloaded from its hosted service, Docker Hub, enabling organizations to create both an agile application environment and an agile organization.

Our responsibility is to give people the tools they need to create applications that weren’t possible before,” said Solomon Hykes, founder and CTO of Docker. “We will continue to honor that commitment to developers and enterprises. We think they are still looking for a platform that helps them build and ship applications in a truly standardized way, without lock-in or unwanted bundled features. That is what we set out to build, and we are not yet content with what we have achieved so far. We are getting a clear message from the market that they like what we are building, and we plan to keep building it. The financing enables us to deliver on that promise.”

Dockerized applications are enabling increased productivity and continuous business innovation for organizations such as the BBC, Gilt, Goldman Sachs, Groupon, ING, Spotify and Yelp. Companies like these are often initially exposed to Docker by a few development teams that integrate Docker into their workflows and are able to immediately demonstrate the productivity benefits of the platform across the development organization. These grassroots efforts quickly receive executive attention when, almost overnight, application enhancements take minutes when they used to take months.

With the accelerating pace of digitization in the financial industry, the breadth, complexity and diversity of our software and infrastructure services has grown materially,” said Don Duet, global co-head of the Technology Division at Goldman Sachs. “The ability to manage and run business-critical technology at scale in an agile and adaptive ecosystem has become fundamental to our firm. When our engineers discovered and started using Docker’s open source platform, they were immediately impressed by the portability it provides applications. It inspired us to move towards a standardized infrastructure for packaging, shipping and running our applications based on Docker’s technology.”

An April 2015 survey of 685 enterprise CIOs by Enterprise Technology Research highlights that Docker technology has the strongest buying intention score (known as a Net spending intentions score or “NET score”) ever recorded in the six years of the firm’s research, which covers 274 technology vendors across 24 sectors of enterprise technology. This aligns with the positive feedback that Docker has received on its flagship commercial product, Docker Hub Enterprise, which is being beta trialed by a number of Fortune 100 companies and will be made broadly available later this quarter.

“The combination of strong product demand and a rapidly-expanding ecosystem has put Docker on a growth trajectory far beyond what most companies experience in this phase of their development,” said Ben Golub, CEO of Docker. “This type of financial support, in addition to the high caliber of this group of investors, provides Docker with the resources and guidance needed to meet the demands of all aspects of our community – from open source contributors to Fortune 100 enterprises. Over the course of the last six months, we’ve exceeded every growth milestone we set for the company and the community. With the continued support of our investors, partners and community, Docker will continue to disrupt organizational conventions, transforming monolithic teams, processes and applications into more productive and agile microservices environments.”

About Docker, Inc.

Docker, Inc. is the company behind the Docker open source platform, and is the chief sponsor of the Docker ecosystem. Docker is an open platform for developers and system administrators to build, ship, and run distributed applications. With Docker, IT organizations shrink application delivery from months to minutes, frictionlessly move workloads between data centers and the cloud, and can achieve up to 20X greater efficiency in their use of computing resources. Inspired by an active community and by transparent, open source innovation, Docker containers have been downloaded 300 million times and Docker is used by millions of developers across thousands of the world’s most innovative organizations, including eBay, Baidu, the BBC, Groupon, ING, Yelp, Spotify, Yandex, and Cambridge HealthCare. Docker’s rapid adoption has catalyzed an active ecosystem, resulting in more than 100,000 “Dockerized” applications, over 40 Docker-related startups,  and integration partnerships with AWS, Cloud Foundry, Google, IBM, Microsoft, OpenStack, Rackspace, Red Hat and VMware.

Docker, Inc. is venture backed by AME Cloud Ventures, Benchmark, Coatue, Goldman Sachs, Greylock Partners, Insight Venture Partners, Northern Trust, Sequoia Capital, SV Angel , Trinity Ventures, and Y Combinator.

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Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

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The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks!

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Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

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Three Factors For Choosing Your Long-term Cloud Strategy

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The Security Gap You’re out of your mind if you think blocking access to file sharing services is filling a security gap. You’re out of your mind if you think making people jump through hoops like Citrix and VPNs to get at content is secure. You’re out of your mind if you think putting your…

Digital Transformation: Not Just For Large Enterprises Anymore

Digital Transformation: Not Just For Large Enterprises Anymore

Digital Transformation Digital transformation is the acceleration of business activities, processes, and operational models to fully embrace the changes and opportunities of digital technologies. The concept is not new; we’ve been talking about it in one way or another for decades: paperless office, BYOD, user experience, consumerization of IT – all of these were stepping…

Which Is Better For Your Company: Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment?

Which Is Better For Your Company: Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment?

Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment? You know how enterprise resource management (ERP) can improve processes within your supply chain, and the things to keep in mind when implementing an ERP system. But do you know if cloud-based or on-premise ERP deployment is better for your company or industry? While cloud computing is becoming more and…

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security It’s no secret many organizations rely on popular cloud providers like Amazon and Microsoft for access to computing infrastructure. The many perks of cloud services, such as the ability to quickly scale resources without the upfront cost of buying physical servers, have helped build a multibillion-dollar cloud industry that continues to grow each…

Having Your Cybersecurity And Eating It Too

Having Your Cybersecurity And Eating It Too

The Catch 22 The very same year Marc Andreessen famously said that software was eating the world, the Chief Information Officer of the United States was announcing a major Cloud First goal. That was 2011. Five years later, as both the private and public sectors continue to adopt cloud-based software services, we’re interested in this…

Multi-Cloud Integration Has Arrived

Multi-Cloud Integration Has Arrived

Multi-Cloud Integration Speed, flexibility, and innovation require multiple cloud services As businesses seek new paths to innovation, racing to market with new features and products, cloud services continue to grow in popularity. According to Gartner, 88% of total compute will be cloud-based by 2020, leaving just 12% on premise. Flexibility remains a key consideration, and…


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