Category Archives: Security

Cyber Security Tips For Digital Collaboration

Cyber Security Tips For Digital Collaboration

Cyber Security Tips

October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month – a joint effort by the Department of Homeland Security and private industry to ensure that citizens and businesses alike have the resources they need to use the Internet safely and securely. Today’s cyber criminals are ingenious and constantly probing for vulnerabilities, and when breaches occur they can put the whole company at risk. Don’t give them the opportunity!

cloudtweaks.com-comicOne of the biggest security challenges companies face is that the way we work together has changed dramatically – a transformation that is still ongoing. The term “workplace” is becoming an anachronism as people find new ways to collaborate digitally, anywhere, at any time. Sensitive information needs to be shared among dispersed teams that may include co-workers, partners, customers and other stakeholders. Some of these individuals are vetted and trusted, others…not so much.

Since most security breaches start with human error, now is a fitting time to share some reminders for employees and business users. Think of these as your first line of defense when collaborating in an unsafe world.

Don’t Intermingle Work and Personal Files

Always keep business and personal files separate, otherwise you’re asking for trouble. (A certain presidential candidate learned this the hard way!) For cloud apps, use separate accounts. If work and personal files must be on the same device, store them as far apart as possible, using different directory paths.

Use Strong Passwords and Keep Them Safe

According to Verizon’s 2016 Data Breach Investigations Report, 63% of confirmed data breaches involved leveraging weak, default or stolen passwords. Employees, contractors and everyone else in your business ecosystem should be required to use unique credentials with strong, unique passwords, rather than the name of their pet goldfish over and over. Even if a password is exposed just once, the potential consequences are enough to make a security manager cringe. Remind people that the infamous Target breach began when some hacker stole a heating contractor’s credentials, while at Home Depot, someone used a vendor’s username and password to steal credit card info for more than 50 million people.

Verify Email Addresses Are Correct

According to a Ponemon Institute survey of over 1000 IT professionals, 63% of respondents have accidentally sent files to the wrong recipients – people who clearly were not authorized to see them. Here’s a simple suggestion: if an employee needs to send an email to someone for the first time, have the intended recipient send an initial email so the employee can respond to it and use it thereafter. This eliminates the chance they’ll get the address wrong – misspell a company name, forget a dash (or add one), use “.com” instead of “.org“, etc., and send a file goodness knows where.

Don’t Send Sensitive Files using a Consumer-Grade Service

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When employees need to share a file that’s too large for email, it’s tempting to send it through Dropbox, Box or some other consumer-grade file sharing service – or simply park it there for convenience. While many of these consumer-grade services have improved their security measures in recent years, they lack the file-level security and controls necessary for protecting sensitive data. For example, a file may be intended for information only, but people are saving it, renaming it, forwarding it others, pasting sections into a competitor’s sales campaign or misusing it in other ways that the sender never intended.

Have Remote Erase Capabilities, or an Effective Alternative

People are always losing their devices – at the airport, in the back of a taxi, at a restaurant, etc. If a device is used to store sensitive data, it also needs a remote wipe feature to be able to erase that data in the event the device is lost or stolen. (NASA learned this lesson the hard way.) Another approach that’s much more flexible is to use information rights management (IRM) software that can delete sensitive files instantly, on any device.

Don’t Share Your Devices with Family and Friends

With the holidays approaching, many people will be receiving new devices (laptops, phones, etc.) as gifts, and family and friends will be pleading for a chance to use them. According to a survey by Kaspersky Lab, one third of respondents reported sharing their personal devices, and of those, 32% took no precautions to protect their information. Why tempt people? In addition, some family members probably have minimal awareness or understanding of today’s cyber threats, and how cunning the perpetrators can be.

Stay Safe Online – and Collaborate with Confidence

Since most security breaches start with human error, educating your staff is an obvious way to reduce the risk. But we also have to remember that training only goes so far – whenever human beings are involved, there’s always the chance of risky behaviors and silly mistakes. And if someone takes advantage of a security lapse to sneak onto your network and steal sensitive data, the damage may not be apparent for weeks or months.

Thus a company has to back up its first line of defense with other measures to keep its information safe. Consider a solution that embeds encryption and user privileges directly into a file, including who is authorized to access it and what operations they can perform with it. These permissions then follow the file wherever it goes on, on any device it lands on. If sensitive data falls into the wrong hands, access can be immediately revoked. Companies get control over their files that’s not available with email or traditional file sharing. As business becomes increasingly powered by digital collaboration, it’s the way to keep sensitive information secure while using it to full advantage.

By Daren Glenister

The Managed DNS Industry

The Managed DNS Industry

DNS Industry 

The SaaS industry has been going through a major shift in just the last few years, which is redefining how platforms are designed. System and network administrators are demanding all-in-one platforms for a variety of management tasks. The managed DNS industry, for one, has been radically altered by this shift. Both new and existing DNS providers are rolling out integrated platforms, which combine the analytical power of monitoring with advanced query management.

The Internet has been abuzz as the skeptical sys admins question how these integrated platforms can fix issues their predecessors couldn’t. And can you replace your current toolset with an all-in-one platform?

The principal idea behind these platforms is synergy, a mutually dependent relationship between monitoring and management. This technology is made possible by the cloud, which allows information to be shared between the two services in real time. The cloud foundations for all-in-one platforms have also proven to make these subscription services noticeably cheaper.

So what is this synergistic secret sauce that makes these all-in-one services so revolutionary? In the case of DNS management, network monitoring is integral to efficient query routing. What’s the point of making changes to your network configurations if you can’t monitor and analyze the results? This can also be applied the other way around: what’s the point in monitoring your network if you can’t fix the problems that you identify?

security-tips

Traffic management should never feel like a shot in the dark, rather it should be informed and calculated to provide the best result for each individual end-user. The new integrated platform push is forcing admins to rethink how they manage their organizations’ traffic.

The problem is, too many admins think these tools are only used for anticipating DDoS or resolving attacks and outages. To be frank, outages are rare, but they can be devastating. DNS management has shifted from outage resolution to performance optimization. Next-generation managed DNS solutions will take a look at your entire network and implement changes to improve the experience for all of your end-users—individually optimized for each user’s location, browser, IP connectivity, and more.

Admins aren’t wrong for wanting to use query management for security reasons. That’s because DNS traffic operates at a critical ingress point for managing incoming traffic; as in, you can filter and root out malicious traffic before it even reaches your site. But what most admins seem to forget is these same management tools can be used to eliminate latency and improve network performance.

End-users are demanding faster load times, especially from mobile sites. DNS resolution times are only one portion of load time, but 50% of page load time is taken up by network latency overhead. Admins have to leverage every layer of the stack for optimal performance, or get left behind.

All-in-one management solutions are proving to be invaluable during high traffic periods. You can analyze traffic loads and redirect segments of traffic so that it’s balanced across many different resources or locations. You can also use this technology to minimize resolution times, by ensuring queries are being answered at the nearest possible server, or most optimally performing server (in case the closest one is under strain or underperforming).

These platforms are also incorporating Artificial Intelligence (AI) to analyze areas causing performance degradation and then make changes to alleviate them before they can cause appreciable affects to end-users. Some AI’s are paired with automated services that are able to recognize performance trends and patterns. They then use the analytics to anticipate and even predict potential attacks or fluctuations.

These all-in-one suites have created a new breed of traffic management, called Internet Traffic Optimization Services (ITOS). This new industry seeks to redefine the way admins manage their networks, by harnessing the power of analytics to make informed proactive changes. DNS is a user’s first and most impactful step when accessing a website, which is why ITOS places a strong emphasis on informed DNS management.

In the end, it all comes down to the cold hard stats. In order to get the most ROI out of a service, you need to look for reliability, cost efficiency, and proven performance improvements. All-in-one and ITOS solutions may still be in their formative years, but these solutions provide admins with all the tools they need in one platform. Now admins can see the performance improvement of their configurations in real time, while still costing less than non-integrated services.

By Steven Job

Great Cloud Platforms Need to Win the Hearts and Minds of Developers First

Great Cloud Platforms Need to Win the Hearts and Minds of Developers First

Great Cloud Platforms 

Adoption of cloud computing services is growing exponentially all around the world. Companies are realizing that so much of the hard, expensive work that they used to have to do internally can now be outsourced to cloud providers, allowing the companies to focus on what it is that they do best. That’s the reason why tech research firm Gartner projects that over the next five years, the shift to the cloud is looking to be a US$1-trillion market.

Everything from running payrolls, to marketing, logistics, data analysis and much, much more is moving to the cloud, and one of the most successful uses of the cloud is the concept of Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS, as it is known). What this does is enable customers to develop, run and manage their own applications without having to invest heavily in the infrastructure required in order to develop and launch a web application.

The key to creating a good product on the right platform is to win the hearts and minds of web developers so that they choose the right platform to go with. SAP, the world’s largest enterprise cloud company with over 320,000 customers and over 110 million cloud users in 190 countries is using its extensive experience and knowledge in the business space to offer the SAP HANA Cloud Platform, a remarkable service for all company sizes. This platform is already being used extensively by developers who are creating apps for their customers or their various organizations and employees.

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The SAP HANA Cloud Platform enables developers to build business applications in the cloud quickly and easily.

Three features of this platform stand out:

  1. its ability to extend your cloud and on-premise applications to develop customized hybrid solutions,
  2. the awesome feature allowing you to integrate applications seamlessly and securely to synchronize data and processes across cloud, on-premise and third-party applications, as well as
  3. the core feature which allows you to build new enterprise-ready applications rapidly with an open standards platform that brings out the best in developers.

The Director of Group Software at the Danone Group, Ralf Steinbach, says that “with SAP HANA Cloud Platforms, we can quickly develop beautiful, user-friendly applications that are opening new opportunities to connect our customers directly to our back-end systems.”

Cloud services are a rapidly expanding market, and research indicates there are over 150 PaaS offerings to choose from. Too often companies simply choose the PaaS of a cloud-service provider that they’re already working with, without exploring the offerings in-depth and with a long-term focus.

According to John Rymer of Forrester Research, there are three types of developers who make use of PaaS offerings to build apps:

  1. Coders, who want the ability to do it all themselves,
  2. DevOps developers who want the ability to do some coding if they need to but can also plug into some level of abstraction, and
  3. RapidDevs who don’t want to code at all but just to configure a task to the capabilities of the platform.

For each of these types of developers, the SAP HANA Cloud Platform can deliver, due to its flexibility, requiring fewer skills and still at a lower cost. That flexibility extends to the choices that customers are offered between selecting to use a private, managed cloud, a public pay-as-you-go model or even public cloud infrastructure-as-a-service or platform-as-a-service.

In order for a platform to survive and thrive, it requires developers to regard it as the best choice for what they have to do on a daily basis: easily and quickly deploy applications that leverage a proven in-memory platform for next generation applications and analytics supported by a world-class technical team at every step of the way.

A great way to get started with SAP HANA Cloud Platform is with the user-based packages. Priced per users, they offer the flexibility to choose the package that best fits your needs. You can get started for as little as $25 / user / month, and scale as you go, adding more users or upgrading to add more resources when you need them.

For a limited time, you can get 30% off SAP HANA Cloud Platform user-based packages on the SAP Store by using the promo code HCP30.

Sponsored spotlight series by SAP

By Jeremy Daniel

Making Enterprise IT Affordable for Small Businesses with the Cloud

Making Enterprise IT Affordable for Small Businesses with the Cloud

Making Enterprise IT Affordable

Recent advancements in cloud technology have made enterprise IT services, like DNS management, a reality for even small businesses.

Customers have started to expect the same levels of online performance from small businesses as they do from enterprises. Everything from application to network performance, even DNS resolution times are all being held to the same standard as tech giants, like Google. If you can’t meet these standards, then the Twittersphere will explode, your brand could be damaged, and you could be losing revenue… all because you can’t be Google.

cloud-apps

Everyone wants to point the finger at the millennials. The demand generation who expects every business, no matter the size or scale, to have a responsive website, mobile app, social media presence, and everything must load within two seconds or less, or else you’ll have to deal with a scathing Yelp review.

But you’d be wrong to assume it’s their fault. Nearly every generation has become accustomed these demands, to the point where they have become standards for all online businesses. While some demands may seem outlandish, we are only going to focus on the critical ones that apply to all industries and businesses.

If you are a modern business, then you need to make sure your content is readily accessible and loads quickly regardless of a customer’s location or device.

How are small businesses supposed to maintain stride with these performance metrics? Most companies don’t have the resources, connections, or know-how to engineer the same performance as enterprise organizations. Let alone the time to stay on top of Internet trends, vulnerabilities, and regulations.

The Answer is ITOS

The ITOS (Internet Traffic Optimization Services) industry strives to bridge the gap by using cloud technology to help companies of all sizes achieve the same performance goals as enterprises. ITOS uses cloud-hosted management platforms to give small businesses the same global infrastructure as a tech giant, without the tech giant price tag.

Recent studies have shown that migrating to the cloud can and will save your organization money, no matter how large or small your network needs are.

These networks use Anycast technology, which is hosted in the cloud, self-healing, and highly redundant. Anycast networks are able to authoritatively represent a domain’s name servers at multiple points of presence. That means your domain’s DNS information is hosted at dozens of locations around the world, on multiple name servers at any given time. This dramatically reduces the time it takes for clients to resolve your domain because your DNS information is hosted locally. It’s simple physics, the closer you are to your end-users, the faster your site will load.

Now mom and pop’s can take advantage of multi-million dollar networks with infrastructure at dozens of different critical peering hubs around the world.

But speed is only one of many benefits that small businesses gain when implementing an ITOS solution. DNS management has dramatically evolved through the migration to cloud-hosted networks, but more importantly through the availability of big data. The cloud has made big data faster, affordable, and is able to be updated in real-time. Now, you can use big data analytics to influence routing decisions in real time. You can gather critical insights about your end-users’ routing patterns and behaviors and make intelligent routing decisions customized on a per user basis.

If you want to learn more about how to implement an ITOS solution to improve your businesses’ online performance, you can download this eBook for free here.

By Steven Job

Data Sharing: A Matter of Transparency and Control

Data Sharing: A Matter of Transparency and Control

Janrain’s Consumer Identity Survey Shows 93% are Concerned How Brands Use/Share Their Online Activity

It comes as no surprise that people suffer from anxiety when sharing their personal information, even with big brands and names in the social media and eCommerce field. What does come as a surprise is the sheer number of netizens who share these feelings.

A recent research report put out by Marketwired found out that more than 93 percent of online users are concerned about how their info is used online. (Below is a colorful infographic created by the group at Janrain.)

So what are some of the reasons behind this hesitation?

janrain_identitysurvey_comic_full-01-1-compressor

Update: Timeline of the Massive DDoS DYN Attacks

Update: Timeline of the Massive DDoS DYN Attacks

DYN DDOS Timeline

This morning at 7am ET a DDoS attack was launched at Dyn (the site is still down at the minute), an Internet infrastructure company whose headquarters are in New Hampshire. So far the attack has come in 2 waves, the first at 11.10 UTC and the second at around 16.00 UTC. So far details have been vague, though there are a number of theories starting to surface in the aftermath of the attack. The attack took down numerous websites including Twitter, Amazon, Spotify and Reddit for a period – you can find the full list of affected sites here. PSN and Xbox live apps have also been affected!

scan-iot

The timeline of events according to the DYN updates is as follows:

11:10 UTC- We began monitoring and mitigating a DDoS attack against our Dyn Managed DNS infrastructure. Some customers may experience increased DNS query latency and delayed zone propagation during this time.

12:45 UTC – This attack is mainly impacting US East and is impacting Managed DNS customers in this region. Our Engineers are continuing to work on mitigating this issue.

13:36 UTC – Services have been restored to normal as of 13:20 UTC.

16:06 UTC – As of 15:52 UTC, we have begun monitoring and mitigating a DDoS attack against our Dyn Managed DNS infrastructure. Our Engineers are continuing to work on mitigating this issue.

16:48 UTC – This DDoS attack may also be impacting Dyn Managed DNS advanced services with possible delays in monitoring. Our Engineers are continuing to work on mitigating this issue.

17:53 UTC – Our engineers continue to investigate and mitigate several attacks aimed against the Dyn Managed DNS infrastructure.

18:23 UTC – Dyn Managed DNS advanced service monitoring is currently experiencing issues. Customers may notice incorrect probe alerts on their advanced DNS services. Our engineers continue to monitor and investigate the issue.

18:52 UTC – At this time, the advanced service monitoring issue has been resolved. Our engineers are still investigating and mitigating the attacks on our infrastructure.

20:37 UTC – Our engineers continue to investigate and mitigate several attacks aimed against the Dyn Managed DNS infrastructure.

Cloud Disaster Recovery

The attack has come only a few hours after Doug Madory, DYN researcher, presented a talk (you can watch it here) on DDoS attacks in Dallas at a meeting of the North American Network Operators Group (NANOG). Krebs on Security has also drawn links between reports of extortion threats posted on this thread, with the threats clearly referencing DDoS attacks – “If you will not pay in time, DDoS attack will start, your web-services will go down permanently. After that, price to stop will be increased to 5 BTC with further increment of 5 BTC for every day of attack.”

They do however, distance themselves from making any actual claims of extortion, “Let me be clear: I have no data to indicate that the attack on Dyn is related to extortion, to Mirai or to any of the companies or individuals Madory referenced in his talk this week in Dallas

However, this isn’t the only theory circulating at the moment. Dillon Townsel from IBM security has tweeted:

Heavy.com has reported that hacking group PoodleCorp are being blamed for the attack by Product-reviews.net because of the cryptic tweet that they posted 2 days ago, “October 21st #PoodleCorp will be putting @Battlefield in the oven

PoodleCorp famously took down the Pokemon Go servers in July. Homeland Security and the FBI are investigating the attack and are yet to deem who was responsible.

Today’s attack is very different to the DDoS style that Anonymous rose to fame with. Instead of attacking and taking out an individual website for short periods of time, hackers took down a massive piece of the internet backbone for an entire morning, not once but twice with new reports of a potential 3rd wave. At the moment there have been no claims of ownership for the attack nor has there been any concrete evidence of who perpetrated the attack.

Dyn are well known for publishing detailed reports on attacks of this nature so we can only hope they will do the same for their own servers.

Until then you can follow any updates that Dyn are releasing here.

DDoS Attack – Update 10/24/2016

As of 22.17 UTC on October 21st Dyn declared the massive IoT attack, which had crippled large parts of the internet, to be over. However, details surrounding the attack are still emerging.

In the midst of the chaos, WikiLeaks tweeted this,  “Mr. Assange is still alive and WikiLeaks is still publishing. We ask supporters to stop taking down the US internet. You proved your point.

ddos-graph

– suggesting that they knew who the perpetrators were. Perhaps even that they requested that attack, although this is pure speculation at this point.

A senior U.S. intelligence official spoke to NBC News, he commented that the current assessment is that this is a case of “internet vandalism”. At this point, they do not believe that it was any kind of state-sponsored or directed attack.

Hangzhou Xiongmai Technology, who specialise in DVRs and internet-connected cameras, said on Sunday that its products security vulnerabilities inadvertently played a role in the cyberattack, citing weak default passwords in its products as the cause.

Security researchers have discovered that malware known as Mirai was used to take advantage of these weaknesses by infecting the devices and using them to launch huge distributed denial-of service attacks. Mirai works by infecting and taking over IoT devices to create a massive connected network, which then overloads sites with requests and takes the website offline.

At this point we do not know when the identity of the hackers will become clear. Watch this page for more updates as they become available.

By Josh Hamilton

Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

DDoS Knocks Out Several Websites

Cyber attacks targeting the internet infrastructure provider Dyn disrupted service on major sites such as Twitter and Spotify on Friday, mainly affecting users on the U.S. East Coast.

It was not immediately clear who was responsible. Officials told Reuters that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Bureau of Investigation were both investigating.

The disruptions come at a time of unprecedented fears about the cyber threat in the United States, where hackers have breached political organizations and election agencies.

Homeland Security last week issued a warning about a powerful new approach for blocking access to websites – hackers infecting routers, printers, smart TVs and other connected devices with malware that turns them into “bot” armies that overwhelm website servers in distributed denial of service attacks.

Dyn said it had resolved one attack, which disrupted operations for about two hours, but disclosed a second attack a few hours later that was causing further disruptions.

In addition to the social network Twitter and music-streamer Spotify, the discussion site Reddit, hospitality booking service Airbnb and The Verge news site were among companies whose services were disrupted on Friday.

Amazon.com Inc’s web services division, one of the world’s biggest cloud computing companies, also reported a related outage, which it said was resolved early Friday afternoon.

Dyn is a Manchester, New Hampshire-based provider of services for managing domain name servers (DNS), which act as switchboards connecting internet traffic. Requests to access sites are transmitted through DNS servers that direct them to computers that host websites.

Its customers include some of the world’s biggest corporations and Internet firms, such as Pfizer, Visa, Netflix and Twitter, SoundCloud and BT.

Dyn said it was still trying to determine how the attack led to the outage but that its first priority was restoring service.

Attacking a large DNS provider can create massive disruptions because such firms are responsible for forwarding large volumes of internet traffic.

Full Article Source: Reuters

Politics 2.0: The Age of Cyber-Political Warfare

Politics 2.0: The Age of Cyber-Political Warfare

Cyber-Political Warfare

Do you remember the last time hackers and cybercriminals determined the outcome of a presidential race? Of course not, because it’s never happened. It could happen now. Without even thinking about it, we’ve slipped into a new era. I would dub this the Age of Cyber-Political Warfare. This playing-field is thick with espionage, and it’s dominated by people who have little to no political clout. Instead, they have technical know-how.

It’s common knowledge that the internet is rife with identity theft. Social profiles, email, ecommerce sites, and mobile devices all provide excellent avenues for cyber-thieves. Oftentimes, it doesn’t take hacking skills to get information. The Snapchat employees who had their information stolen were victims of an email phishing scam. All the thief had to do was pretend to be Snapchat’s CEO and ask a single employee for payroll data.

hacks

In the case of Hillary Clinton, it wasn’t hard for a cybercriminal to reveal her email activities. Data security firm Kroll points out that the revelation didn’t even technically involve hacking. Rather, it’s a high-profile case of a compromised account. The compromiser, ‘Guccifer’ Marcel Lehel Lazar, used Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) to find out personal information about Sydney Blumenthal, who is a Clinton confidant. He used Open Source information to figure out Blumenthal’s email password. From there, he discovered Clinton was using a private server to email Blumenthal. Then, Guccifer published Clinton’s private email info online.

Guccifer was sentenced to four years in prison. Is that enough to deter an onlooker from copying his crimes? Apparently not, because Guccifer 2.0 has surfaced to release more stolen information. According to the original Guccifer, this kind of digital detective work is “easy… easy for me, for everybody.” Everybody can hunt down information that could potentially determine the result of a political election. This puts a brand new kind of power in the hands of the many. Anyone smart enough to follow trails of data online can be a player in the Age of Cyber-Political Warfare.

The biggest player here is Russia. The White House is certain that Russia’s state-sponsored hackers compromised Democratic National Committee email accounts, with the intent of influencing the election. Secureworks reports that the hackers used a phishing scam. They made it look like members of the Clinton campaign and the DNC were logging into Gmail accounts. The login page was fake, and through it the hackers gained login data. Reportedly, Russian hacking group Fancy Bear used Bitly to setup the malicious URLs, which read ‘accounts-google.com’ instead of accounts.google.com. Now Bitly isn’t just a customer experience platform and IBM partner. It’s an unwitting tool in the hands of malicious hackers.

Obama promised a proportional response to the hacks. What would cyberwar with Russia look like? If a ‘proportional response’ is coming, we’ll see the release of inside information about Vladimir Putin or other high-ranking Russian officials. But how this would influence Russian politics, no one can be sure. Russia could merely cite our desire to get revenge and brush any sort of leaks off as petty attempts to disparage Russian officials.

One thing is clear: to be a politician now, you have to be, at minimum, cognizant of cyber threats. While American politics is stuck in the binary of red vs. blue, the fluid and fast world of the web is a much more complex place. It’s a place where people wheel-and-deal on a multinational level. It’s a powerful place to reach people and to access their data. Politicians want to use the internet as a tool, but by doing so they’re placing their data and their information at risk. In the Age of Cyber-Political Warfare, that data will continue to be a weapon for invisible and powerful opponents.

By Daniel Matthews

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Cloud Security Missteps Cloud computing remains shrouded in mystery for the average American. The most common sentiment is, “It’s not secure.” Few realize how many cloud applications they access every day: Facebook, Gmail, Uber, Evernote, Venmo, and the list goes on and on… People flock to cloud services for convenient solutions to everyday tasks. They…

The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise of BI Data Every few years, a new concept or technological development is introduced that drastically improves the business world as a whole. In 1983, the first commercially handheld mobile phone debuted and provided workers with an unprecedented amount of availability, leading to more productivity and profits. More recently, the Cloud has taken…

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority Research has revealed that third parties cause 63 percent of all data breaches. From HVAC contractors, to IT consultants, to supply chain analysts and beyond, the threats posed by third parties are real and growing. Deloitte, in its Global Survey 2016 of third party risk, reported…

Having Your Cybersecurity And Eating It Too

Having Your Cybersecurity And Eating It Too

The Catch 22 The very same year Marc Andreessen famously said that software was eating the world, the Chief Information Officer of the United States was announcing a major Cloud First goal. That was 2011. Five years later, as both the private and public sectors continue to adopt cloud-based software services, we’re interested in this…

Using Cloud Technology In The Education Industry

Using Cloud Technology In The Education Industry

Education Tech and the Cloud Arguably one of society’s most important functions, teaching can still seem antiquated at times. Many schools still function similarly to how they did five or 10 years ago, which is surprising considering the amount of technical innovation we’ve seen in the past decade. Education is an industry ripe for innovation…

Maintaining Network Performance And Security In Hybrid Cloud Environments

Maintaining Network Performance And Security In Hybrid Cloud Environments

Hybrid Cloud Environments After several years of steady cloud adoption in the enterprise, an interesting trend has emerged: More companies are retaining their existing, on-premise IT infrastructures while also embracing the latest cloud technologies. In fact, IDC predicts markets for such hybrid cloud environments will grow from the over $25 billion global market we saw…

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

DDoS Attacks October 21st, 2016 went into the annals of Internet history for the large scale Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks that made popular Internet properties like Twitter, SoundCloud, Spotify and Box inaccessible to many users in the US. The DDoS attack happened in three waves targeting DNS service provider Dyn, resulting in a total of about…