Category Archives: Technology

Cloud Infographic: The Road To HIPAA Compliance

Cloud Infographic: The Road To HIPAA Compliance

The Road To HIPAA Compliance

HIPAA has been a very important topic of discussion here on CloudTweaks over the past several months. Top 5 HIPAA Security Risks As Providers Migrate to the Cloud and Moving HIPAA Compliant Healthcare Data into the Cloud are two articles with focus on healthcare data in the cloud. Provided is an excellent infographic by Axway which offers a series of questions and facts with relation to HIPAA.

VERTICAL ROADMAP_02

Pinup: Bitium Consolidates All Of Your SaaS Apps

Pinup: Bitium Consolidates All Of Your SaaS Apps

Pinup: Bitium Consolidates All Of Your SaaS Apps and Credentials Into One Central Location

Each and every day, more and more companies are moving the lion’s share of their business into the cloud. While the benefits of doing so are legion, unfortunately, not all things become easier when things are moved to the cloud.

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For example, once files and data have been put in the cloud, entrance to them must be closely guarded to ensure that no unauthorized access is made. This will cause the number of authentications and permissions that need to be regulated and controlled to increase in step, resulting in huge headaches if they are not managed properly. This area is where Bitium truly shines.

Bitium is a Los Angeles-based startup company that emerged from the Amplify accelerator program in 2012. Bitium was founded by Scott Kriz and Erik Gustavson and was designed as a centralized platform for all SaaS applications.

scott-krizAs Bitium co-founder and CEO Scott Kriz puts it “Our vision is to change how people and companies work by fundamentally changing the way they interact with software. We’ve created an open system that’s self-organizing. It’s like letting people pick what they want off the menu rather than telling them what’s for lunch.”

Bitium has received several rounds of funding from investors, starting with $2.4 million in April of 2013 from a group that included big southern-California names like Double M Partners and Karlin Ventures. This continued in 2014 with an additional $6.5 Million in series-A funding, provided by Polaris Partners.

One Password To Rule Them All

One of the primary benefits of using Bitium is that all of the different logins and authentications needed to access cloud-based apps and projects are boiled down into one. Not only does this bypass the obstacle of each employee having to remember multiple authentications, it also allows managers to keep track of the progress of projects and which apps are being used to complete them.

Delegation Made Easy

Once an employee signs in, supervisors can delegate access to different apps without the need for additional passwords. This is all done in one, central interface, making the processes of monitoring, access and feedback much easier to perform. Bitium is an excellent solution for any corporation planning to make substantial use of cloud-based apps and storage. By combining all login and authentication credentials into one central location, Bitium is poised to save you big in time, money and frustration.

By Joe Pellicone

If you are a new cloud startup and have a promising service, contact us to see if you qualify for free exposure under our CloudTweaks Pinup series. Please mention “Pinup” in the subject title.

How Cloud-Based Channel Management Is Automating Critical Business Processes

How Cloud-Based Channel Management Is Automating Critical Business Processes

Interview: How Cloud-Based Channel Management is Automating Critical Business Processes for Large Technology Manufacturers

By Steve Prentice/CloudTweaksCSank-001

Recently, I spoke with Chandran Sankaran, Founder and CEO of Zyme Solutions in Redwood Shores, CA. Before Zyme, he was Chairman and CEO of Closedloop Solutions, a senior consultant with McKinsey & Company, and also held engineering and management positions with Hewlett-Packard. He has a Masters’ Degree from Yale University, and a Bachelors’ in Electrical Engineering from the prestigious Indian Institute of Technology, Madras.

Q: What are the issues that channel management in the cloud solves for large corporations?

A: We started Zyme in 2004, in response to a mandate from the SEC regarding revenue recognition rules for manufacturers, which required them to report on inventory in the channel to avoid channel-stuffing accusations and be compliant with revenue recognition rules. As a result of that, the transparency and visibility of their sales transactions downstream in the channel went from being a “nice to have” to being a “must have.” That was really the trigger for us.

Then, we found ways to tap into important new data sources, with granular sales intelligence and an unprecedented level of visibility into a trillion dollar flow of commerce through global indirect channels for technology products. The opportunity was there for a transformational shift for large vendors in how they sell, how they market, and how they manage inventory. We could help enterprises smarten up and data-enable traditional business processes that have been suffering from an absence of data. When we started, only a small trickle of data was flowing from distributors and retailers to manufacturers, and today that has become a flood of data.

Q: How extensive is your reach today?

A: We’ve built out a large, cloud-based management platform and a network of reporting channel partners. We’re now aggregating data from over 180 countries, more than 40,000 data feeds a week. As our customers are trying to cope with the increased importance of this data and the failure of their internal systems, they’re looking into the solutions market and discovering that a third-party platform like Zyme is really the answer.

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Q: Can you give an example of how your customers leverage your technology?

A: Let’s say that a customer, a large disk storage company, receives an order from Best Buy to ship 10,000 units of a disc drive to the Waltham Massachusetts warehouse of Best Buy. In yesterday’s world, when an order was placed, it was processed quickly because it was business, and the salespeople wanted the revenue. But in the new world of visibility into the channel, after management learns that there are 10,000 units unsold of a previous generation product, that order for new product is no longer going to be processed, with so much old inventory still sitting there. This results in a significant value creation for the vendor, by reducing the risk of inventory being written off six months down the line. This also adjusts the risk balance for the retailer, the channel participant, because they are not left stranded with old inventory. In order to capture the value, there’s got to be an understanding of how to use this new information transparency in core business processes.

Q: Do you have another example? 

A: Sure. About ten percent of all sales in the technology channel today get paid out as back-end rebates, price protection, market development programs, and so on. They are paid back to the channel partner, and that’s an important source of money for them. The margins on tech products are typically quite low, and resellers look to make up the difference with the back-end programs. Then, a vendor who has clearer visibility into how many transactions were actually done in the channel at a much more finely-grained level has the ability to say, “I’m going to pay these back-end programs in a much tighter way linked to that information, as opposed to paying those back-end programs whether or not the sales were actually accomplished.”

With better information transparency, vendors are going to pay out incentives more smartly to the partners who are most deserving. They’re able to micro-target their resources to elite, successful, nimble partners rather than spreading them out in a less impactful way.

Q: So, is this all about optimizing how many products are where? 

A: Yes, it’s about how much product is where at any given moment, in an industry with shortening cycles and inventory risk. But it’s also about understanding who is acting on your behalf. This whole premise of the indirect channel is that it’s a shared sales infrastructure for an entire industry, which means if I, as a vendor, am to be successful leveraging this shared resource, I’ve got to – without overspending – motivate the channel to act in my best interests. When a customer walks in the door, you want the reseller to sell my product, not my competitor’s product. The sales intelligence and how you link it back to the incentivization of the channel, and the flow of money into the channel that aligns to people behaving in a loyal and positive way towards you – I think it’s going to be quite different in the near future than the way it looked ten years ago.

Q: How do the channel partners benefit from this?

A: Well, several of our customers, large manufacturers, have begun offering favorable incentive terms to partners with higher information transparency. The logic is if you’re transparent about how you’re doing on my behalf, I’m going to favor you in the way I structure incentives and programs and price protection and payment terms and those kinds of things. So this is a non-trivial change that we’ve begun to see. It will have favorable impact on the early compliant movers among channel partners in the market. That’s one dimension.

The second dimension is in introducing information transparency of a really interesting sort into the market. For instance, a distributor might be able to see the geographic spread of their reseller network based on this data, which they may not be able to see today. Manufacturers and distributors alike are able to identify up-and-coming resellers who are worthy of added attention and investment.

Q: What kind of ROI do your customers experience? 

A: The ROI falls into several buckets. Number one is seeing revenue opportunities sooner. This is about seeing, for example, an uptick in three resellers’ sales in the last two or three weeks and having your local account manager contact them and figure out what they’re doing differently and why. It’s also being able to see potential lost revenue before you actually lose it from resellers who have begun switching away from your products and being able to get in front of that.

Second, there is significant cost reduction for the vendor, in terms of leaky incentivizing. Because it’s a trillion dollar industry, a hundred billion gets paid every year in back-end rebates and programs, and we estimate about 15 to 20 percent of it is mispaid, either to the wrong reseller or in the wrong amount, and overpaid most of the time. What often happens is that a dealer claims a rebate, and you don’t have the mechanism to verify that they’re selling on your behalf, and you don’t want to sour an important relationship, so you pay it.

We have seen one of our customers save $7 million in one quarter, in one small region, by using this channel data. They were more selective about paying out all the incentives that were claimed, and were much smarter about what they paid out. There’s significant ROI there.

There’s also ROI associated with inventory risk, both for write-offs and stock-outs. One is revenue impacting and the other is meaningful cash and balance sheet impacting. Those are the sorts of ROI levers associated with the data, and we’ve identified six broad consumption areas in the business where there’s significant ROI as a result of this data, and we’ve done some value engagements based on this for some of our customers.

Some major industry analysts have interviewed our customers and discovered a very large ROI. For one tech company, a very conservative ROI of 200% was identified. While the ROI for the vendor is quite clear, the ROI for channel partners who are smart and early movers will be high too.

Q: With more visibility it seems that there is also more accountability.

A: Yes, business processes that don’t have adequate data and information transparency get cobwebby and stale. The channel has largely grown up in a non-information era. A lot of habits and processes have accumulated that are outdated, and those of us who have worked in the manufacturing and tech sector for a while have got used to “the way things are.” We memorialize this lack of visibility and transparency in terms like the “Bullwhip effect.” You can’t see what’s happening, and so you overcompensate and mistime your business actions. Because there’s been no visibility, we’ve all built processes – we call them approximations – to deal with the lack of data.

If you don’t have transparency, you’ve got to spread the wealth among your channel partners using more approximate methods that value historical relationship more than performance. I do think it’s really the classic visibility argument – add data transparency to let sunlight into old dingy processes, and you find all sorts of opportunities for improvement. The global management of the indirect channels arena is ripe for that, because the information flow itself is a relatively recent development.

Q: Okay, so you’re suggesting that companies “let more sunlight into dingy processes.” Can you expand on that?

A: Sure. It astonishes me how much value gets locked down in a business by virtue of having designed the company in an era when complete information about the business didn’t exist. When you don’t know how much inventory is in your channel, and you’re worried about it being depleted, what do you do? You make more inventory, right? And you buffer more. If, on the other hand, you are worried about how much of your channel inventory is going to be returned to you and what the exposure is, you record reserves and liabilities on your balance sheet to insure against the old stock that might come back to you from the channel. You build your business around approximations and insurance policies in the absence of real information flow. And then, the moment the information flow starts becoming available, and there is more sunlight, it frees up all those pockets of value that have been locked down in the business during the pre-information era.

This is the way I like to think about what Zyme is doing – we’re bringing in more light and enabling an information flow that injects more data into these corporations, to transform old business processes and puncture the airlock where all this value has been trapped, because people designed the businesses around a lack of information.

Q: So, when you have a better idea of what each channel partner is doing, you can manage them better?

A: Sure – and much more dynamically. For instance, if you didn’t know which of your channel partners have switched away from you in the last three months, and are now perhaps working with your competitors promoting their products, you would still be paying those partners who are no longer loyal to you, giving them incentive payments that you computed based on last year’s information, because you didn’t know that they have shifted to your competitors’ products. You do the best you can with the information you have, and all these business processes relating to the channel were designed around slow aggregated anecdotal information flow that results in a ton of value being locked in the enterprises that can be released and used to their advantage.

Q: In a sense, it seems that channel visibility is a new way of creating more sales intelligence for companies that didn’t have it before. 

A: That’s right. Downstream sales intelligence is the most powerful penetrative information – it changes the way you market, changes your view of customers, changes your view of partners who are enabling that flow, changes your view of shifting market dynamics sooner, rather than later, and causes you to alter the course of your business. Indirect channel sales intelligence has been hard to come by, and the world has designed itself around slow-moving, inefficient aggregated information. This is a very transformative instrument – very, disruptive – and very value creating.

As an example, this visibility shines a spotlight on a potential billion dollar misallocation of marketing funds for the trillion dollar tech sector.

Q: How does all this fit with the broader trends of business intelligence we are seeing in enterprises? 

A: One way of looking at that is to see where venture capitalists are investing. There are three or four private equity firms, and venture capitalists who are now investing only in firms that are driving what they call “data-enabled businesses.” These investors are looking for companies that are making transformations based on data enablement. The whole thesis here is business transformation with information. And companies that enable that are unlocking the next wave of value.

Contact information for Zyme Solutions  is available here

Big Data – Top Critical Technology Trend For The Next Five Years

Big Data – Top Critical Technology Trend For The Next Five Years

Big Data Future

Today’s organizations should become more collaborative, virtual, adaptive, and agile in order to be successful in complex business world. They should be able to respond to changes and market needs. Many organizations found that the valuable data they possess and how they use it can make them different than others. In fact, Big Data can transform many fields such as business, management, public administration, science, and so on. In 2012, Gartner defined Big Data as “high-volume, high-velocity, and high-variety information assets that demand cost-effective, innovative forms of information processing for enhanced insight and decision making”. The term volume refers to large amounts of data, velocity indicates the speed of data in and out, and variety describes the range of data types and sources.

According to an industry report prepared by McKinsey Global Institute, the effective use of Big Data is a key basis of competition and delivering a new wave of productive growth. In other words, managing, analysing, visualizing, and extracting useful information from large data sets will help organizations to increase operational efficiency, to inform strategic direction, to develop new products and services, to identify new customers and markets, to make better decisions and to become more innovative. (Davenport, Barth, & Bean, 2012).

Although Big Data bring many attractive opportunities, organizations are also facing a lot of challenges such as data capture, storage, searching, sharing, analysis, and visualization. In recent years, a large number of Big Data techniques and technologies have developed to overcome all the obstacles. Big Data techniques such as statistics, data mining, machine learning, neural networks, social network analysis, signal processing, pattern recognition, optimization methods and visualization approaches; can be used to process efficiently large volume of data.

In addition, organizations need platforms or tools to make sense of big data. They should determine which platforms and tools can help them to meet their business goals. Current tools concentrate on three classes which are batch processing tools, stream processing tools, and interactive analysis tools. Majority of batch processing tools are based on the Apache Hadoop infrastructure which is one of the most important software platforms that support data-intensive distributed applications. It can load, store and query massive data sets on a large, flexible grid servers, as well as perform advanced analytics. It uses a programming model, which is called Map/Reduce, to process and generate great volume of data sets. Map/Reduce breaks down a complex problem into many sub-problems. These sub-problems are solved in separate and parallel ways. Finally, the solutions of sub-problems are combined to create a solution to the original problem. Although Hadoop can process large amount of data in parallel, it is not a real-time and high performance engine. It is not appropriate for high volume, high velocity and complex data types. Hence, other platforms such as SQL stream, Stream Cloud, and Storm can be used for real-time stream data analytics.

By Mojgan Afshari

Yes, It Does Take An Einstein

Yes, It Does Take An Einstein

Yes, It Does Take an Einstein

The phrase, “it doesn’t take an Einstein” is an all-purpose IT department put-down that translates roughly as “it’s so obvious, you don’t need to be a genius to see the right decision to make.” Applied to selecting a cloud computing vendor, this principle would result in the clear understanding that people want reliable performance at a fair market price, with no hidden charges.einstein

Cloud performance has a direct impact on what you spend on compute resources, how you decide the right host for your workload, and how you choose to scale when the need arises. If a service provider offers “fastest performance” at a good price, that’s the right choice, isn’t it? You want the best performance for the money, right? It doesn’t take an Einstein to see that. Except, sometimes it does.

To paraphrase Einstein’s theory of relativity, one’s perception of reality depends on whether one is in motion. Two parties that are in motion will see each other differently depending on their relative speeds and directions. Cloud computing reveals a correlated concept. There is no “top performing” or “fastest” cloud infrastructure. There is only the infrastructure that will perform best for your specific workloads. It’s all relative. At least in this case, thinking like Einstein can help us make the right choice relative to our needs.

What are your cloud workloads? What performance requirements do they need to meet? Different applications and use cases put stress on different parts of the infrastructure. Some need more RAM. Others need more CPU capacity. Others still will see critical performance depend on Input/Output Operations per Second (IOPs). The network and storage are also significant factors in what we would consider overall application performance in the cloud, even if they have nothing to do with the actual hardware that’s doing the computing.

The best practice is to look at specific performance benchmarks for cloud infrastructure relative to your specific workloads. To help our clients accomplish this goal, CenturyLink Cloud recently used CloudHarmony, an objective third party, to measure the baseline performance of our infrastructure offerings. We wanted to understand how well we stacked up against other cloud players in performance areas that mean different things to different buyers. (If you would like to get a copy of the CloudHarmony report, please visit)

One thing that CloudHarmony measured was our IO profile (disk read/write) speed for large block sizes. Why does this matter? If you’re running Microsoft SQL Server database, for example, you will likely be working with 64k blocks. You want to run that kind of workload with a cloud provider that will give you persistent storage and high performance for the large 64K blocks but not charge you for IOPs. This will result in predictable costs and fewer resources needed to achieve optimal performance.

A similar issue arises with the paradox of choice in cloud servers. When you’re faced with dozens of server types to choose from, you find yourself selecting a “best fit” that may compromise in one area (“too much RAM!”) in order to get another (“need 8 CPUs”). In CenturyLink Cloud, we have two classes of servers (Standard and Hyperscale) and both have shown to have reliable performance. Pick whatever amount of CPU or memory that makes sense – which is how traditional servers have always been purchased. If built-in data redundancy doesn’t matter, but reliable, high performance does, you could select our Hyperscale server. If you need strong, consistent performance but want daily storage snapshots and a SAN backbone, you would be best off with our Standard servers. What matters is your specific requirement, not ours. It’s relative. Einstein would approve.

By Richard Seroter

Exploiting Big Data For Creating New Products And Innovation

Exploiting Big Data For Creating New Products And Innovation

Exploiting Big Data For Creating New Products And Innovation

Infographic-Big-Data

With the development of technology resources, organizations will increasingly depend on exploiting data for creating new products, services, innovation as well as changes in business processes. Big data is currently one of the most talked about issues in business and organizations. Big data is a collection of unstructured and multi-structured data that come from traditional and digital sources inside and outside companies representing sources for ongoing discovery and analysis.

Unstructured data refers to information that is not organized such as metadata, Twitter tweets, and other social media posts.

Multi-structured data refers to different types of organised data and data which can be generated from interactions between people and machines, for example, web applications, social networks and web log. Three significant characteristics of big data; high-volume, velocity, and variety; are important in obtaining, extracting, manipulating and interpreting it within an organization.

Many scholars believe that analysing, interpreting, and managing big data will help companies to understand their business environments, to respond to changes, and to create new products and services in order to keep their business fresh and new. Increasingly, long term commercial success is based on an ability to manage change and using data effectively. Many commentators stress the importance of leadership in the big data era. Leaders’ vision, their ability to communicate that vision, their creative thinking, their ability to spot a great opportunity, and the way that they support and deal with employees, customers, stockholders, and other stakeholders can surpass or mobilize change process. Moreover, effective leaders are able to bring together a group of competent professionals and data scientists to work with large quantities of data and information. Data scientists not only should possess statistical, analytical and creative IT skills but also they should be familiar with operations, processes and products within organizations. However, people with these competencies are difficult to find and in great demand.

Technologies such as the Hadoop framework, cloud computing and data visualization tools help skilled professionals to cope with the technical challenges. In fact, the increased volumes of data require major improvements in database technologies. Nowadays, open source platforms such as Hadoop have been designed to load, store and query massive data sets on a large, flexible grid servers, as well as perform advanced analytics. Analysing big data will not be valuable if professionals cannot understand and interpret the results of the analysis. Hence, organizations need great decision makers to examine all the assumptions made and retract the analysis to increase productivity and innovation at all organizational levels. Many scholars believe that automated administrative decision making can save time and improve efficiency. However, there is possibility of some error in computer systems that can lead to errors in interpretation of results. Hence, users should try to examine and verify the results produced by the computer.

By Mojgan Afshari

Placing Business Continuity Ahead Of DR In The Cloud

Placing Business Continuity Ahead Of DR In The Cloud

Why You Need To Put Business Continuity Ahead Of DR In The Cloud 

The emergence of disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) has made thinking about disaster a whole lot less scary for an increasing number of organizations. It’s cheaper than outfitting a separate and equal disaster recovery site that mirrors your data center. It helps your CFO shift costs from the capital budget to the operations budget. It’s backed up by service level agreements (SLAs) with your cloud provider—or should be. It frees your IT team to concentrate on physical and personal challenges presented by the disaster itself. And it’s way faster than tape.

For all its much documented benefits, however, implementing DRaaS, does not excuse you from addressing the state of your typically unloved business continuity plan. To borrow a popular metaphor: DRaaS is the cart, and business continuity is the horse. Unless you make the commitment to develop and/or refresh your long-term business continuity strategy, your DRaaS solution will save your critical data but you could still lose your business.

DRaaS is a technology. It will save whatever data you tell it to, but the success of your business depends as much if not more on the effectiveness and efficiencies of your processes and procedures. Critically reviewing, evaluating and improving your processes and procedures, as a result, is essential to ensuring the success of your business. Skip that step and the business you are protecting with DRaaS, may still not survive.

Avoidable Failure

That’s the stick: commit yourself relentlessly to the rigors of business continuity planning or risk getting whacked with otherwise avoidable failure. There is so much to dislike about that thought that many, if not most organizations, are inclined to not think about it at all. Business continuity planning is something they did five years ago—or more—and it was so much fun then, that they never, ever want to do it again. The whole process was time consuming and disruptive. Some veterans of past business continuity initiatives compare them to being sequestered for a murder trial.

It doesn’t have to be like that. There is a carrot for business continuity…actually several:

  • Business continuity is not just about finding what’s wrong with your business operations, it’s more about identifying what’s right and then finding ways to make them more efficient, reliable and resilient. It’s an opportunity to think strategically, not tactically.
  • Business continuity is not about finger pointing, as much as it is about team building. The continuity of your business, after all, is the shared responsibility of everyone, not just the IT department, but business stakeholders as well.
  • Addressing business continuity fosters not only communications, but also collaboration across the entire organization. Business continuity planning requires that IT and business units share in the responsibility and accountability for the overall well-being of the organization.

The Power to Act

As with any long-term objective, developing a business continuity plan is best undertaken in a phased approach. A good first step is the development of a business continuity roadmap that identifies where you are now and where you want to be in the future. You need to identify risks to critical systems—business and IT—and establish just how much risk you are prepared to accept. (There is no getting rid of all risk.) The roadmap also needs to project a budget that shows specifically what needs to be done, over what period of time, and how much it will cost. You don’t have to do it all at once. Implementing your plan needs to be a sustainable effort, so you need to map out what you can accomplish with available resources over an acceptable period of time.

Cataloging and rating the threats to your survivability has the additional benefit of demystifying them and making them approachable and resolvable. It is a fact of life that most things are scarier when you have your back turned to them. Having knowledge gives you the power to act and allows you to be proactive, instead of reactive.

The key deliverables that result from a comprehensive business continuity plan are choices. You get to decide what to do before a disaster instead of afterwards or worse, in the middle of one. Better yet, you get to choose what steps you and your CFO are willing to take to reduce or eliminate risks to your organization’s continuity of operations. There may well be chances your organization is prepared to take; but you at least need to know what they are.

Living Process

Business continuity planning is not a one-time project. It is a living process like a healthy diet or an exercise routine. The scope of an effective plan needs to be as broad as the organization it is designed to protect, and to ensure that every detail is accounted for and all the right stakeholders are involved.

A good time to talk seriously about business continuity is any time your organization is facing a significant change, i.e., a major systems upgrade, acquiring another company or being acquired. Success is one of the best reasons to ensure nothing happens that would suddenly turn your fortunes in the opposite direction.

The true value of business continuity planning is not limited to technology. Done correctly, the exercise of developing and implementing a thorough business continuity plan opens ongoing conversations between IT and business units which contributes to a sense of trust as well as a shared confidence in their combined abilities to work together as an efficient team to face whatever challenges lie ahead. Hitch a well implemented DRaaS solution to a vigorous business continuity plan, and you have a winning combination of long-term sustainability and affordability.

david-kinlawBy David Kinlaw,

As Logicalis practice manager for protection services, David’s role is to develop comprehensive best practices and disaster recovery and business continuity solutions that protect Logicalis customers from suffering a significant data loss that could impact or threaten their businesses.

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How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

Individuals and Password-Sharing With the 1980s came the explosion of computing. In 1980, the Commodore ushered in the advent of home computing. Time magazine declared 1982 was “The Year of the Computer.” By 1983, there were an estimated 10 million personal computers in the United States alone. As soon as computers became popular, the federal government…

7 Common Cloud Security Missteps

7 Common Cloud Security Missteps

Cloud Security Missteps Cloud computing remains shrouded in mystery for the average American. The most common sentiment is, “It’s not secure.” Few realize how many cloud applications they access every day: Facebook, Gmail, Uber, Evernote, Venmo, and the list goes on and on… People flock to cloud services for convenient solutions to everyday tasks. They…

Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Out-of-the-box Cloud Solutions Although people may argue that data is not safe in the Cloud because using cloud infrastructure requires trusting another party to look after mission critical data, cloud services actually are more secure than legacy systems. In fact, a recent study on the state of cloud security in the enterprise market revealed that…

Connecting With Customers In The Cloud

Connecting With Customers In The Cloud

Customers in the Cloud Global enterprises in every industry are increasingly turning to cloud-based innovators like Salesforce, ServiceNow, WorkDay and Aria, to handle critical systems like billing, IT services, HCM and CRM. One need look no further than Salesforce’s and Amazon’s most recent earnings report, to see this indeed is not a passing fad, but…

Cloud Security Risks: The Top 8 According To ENISA

Cloud Security Risks: The Top 8 According To ENISA

Cloud Security Risks Does cloud security risks ever bother you? It would be weird if it didn’t. Cloud computing has a lot of benefits, but also a lot of risks if done in the wrong way. So what are the most important risks? The European Network Information Security Agency did extensive research on that, and…