Category Archives: Technology

Cloud Trends: Australian CIOs Say Supplying Network Is More Important Than Cost

Cloud Trends: Australian CIOs Say Supplying Network Is More Important Than Cost

For many cloud enthusiasts, the state of data comes first before even thinking about a supplying channel. This explains the offshoot of many private clouds that cut ties with sources and help organizations run the data handling show alone. However, the latest trends from Australia show that the supply network may be even more important than ever before. A hundred and seventy nine Chief Information Officers from the country have recently said that they would consider moving to the cloud if it had reinforcements from the source.

Australian Cloud: key trends in brief

Cost, interestingly enough, is not as much important as other factors of concern. Many of the CIOs who have given their response to help compile the report do not think that, in a system where pay-as-you-go protocol is the peak, it matters to bargain about cost. Indeed, the 28.4% of the executives whose companies are making a move into cloud computing have mainly budgeted for security along the data conduit and not necessarily server charges.

Security has always been a perennial factor and has even continuously contributed to key cloud computing trends. There is always an app, here and there, or a hybrid network seeking to overcome security issues. This is perhaps why nearly 20% of Australians, though little in number compared to other developed economies, are in the independent cloud. This comes of the affirmation that it is one of the safer evils between the Internet-based and the intranet models.

The world of applications has also received rave citations as the one reason why Australia would join the train of cloud computing. Because most of the apps come from developers, this reinforces the fact that many are training their kaleidoscopes on a situation where the supplying network controls the app fields for them. It is also a belief in this particular country that scalability, a very important citation in the West for migrating to the cloud, comes second to the applications mandate. This is because, with dynamic stats, security becomes tighter.

Specific trends

The respondents in this survey show that their country would link any of the following software, factors or improvements for their joining the world of cloud computing, chiefly because they come from supplying channels:

1. Applications like emails, SMS and CRM. These are all handy software, with the former one apt for hosting email accounts, the middle one appropriate for the integrated phone community and the latter for tracing customers for a harmonious relationship.

2. Backup technology. People in Australia are now looking forward to the cloud and this trend can improve when better backup technology and more one-on-one coercions with the suppliers for safety of data come in place.

3. Datacenters that subsidize costs. Though the actual cost of the facilitation is not as important as preferring working in the cloud, the fact that shared datacenters promote the pay-as-you-use model tilts the price balance. This is despite the fact that one is using software and data provisions, freely as a service, from another provider.

To cap the Cloud computing trends, especially in Australia, it is only right to say that business owners are looking for providers in their own countries. They would like to see their servers stationed inside the closest data facilities possible. Perhaps this gives a green light about the infiltrations of patriotism into the cloud.

Analysts believe that server technologies that hosts data far from the original source will continue to be the in-thing for years to come. In fact, users will be deciding which country’s policies, outside their own are most conducive for storing data without attracting levies.

By John Omwamba

Can We Afford The Resources We Spend On The Cloud?

Can We Afford The Resources We Spend on the Cloud?

We often think about the Cloud in terms of security, services provided, storage space and price so it is fairly easy to forget about the resources that are needed to keep the Cloud floating in the blue, virtual sky. And yet even our home computers are sucking enough power that if you did not use them for a month and you and would set in place green measures like auto sleep, you would see a significant improvement in your electrical bill.

So how much electricity does the Cloud eat up? It is nearly impossible for any one person or business to tell because the Cloud is made up of thousands of data centers and they are all owned by different entities. Even more significant is that one of the best ways to secure those data centers is to keep their physical location secret. Needless to say, the details about their makeup are closely guarded secrets.

Still there is one thing that can be said about how much power the least of these data centers consumes: it would be enough to power a medium-sized town.

The worst thing about it is that the priority of these data centers is to operate at peak efficiency. That means that they could save almost 90% of the energy that they currently use if they agreed to power down unused parts of the system until it is needed. But, since that would affect both the security of the system and its efficiency, the power keeps going in.

Yet we have never shied away from making great sacrifices when they were made for a good cause and, despite what some may argue, the cloud can be more than just a fad. There are more and more applications that are available for free or for a fraction of the cost it would take to buy them privately. And letting more people make use of them at any given time means that there are more chances for some fantastic works of art to be created or for some outstanding medical breakthroughs to be made.

Even as we speak the fantastic computing power that Watson, the Jeopardy winning super computer created by IBM, represents is being prepared to be uploaded on the Cloud. Watson is already using its 90 servers and 16,000 gigabytes of RAM to go through hundreds of peer-reviewed cancer research papers to become one of the best diagnosticians that oncologists can use.

The only problem is that we, as humans, already need to set aside our preconceptions about computers. There are doctors who will regard Watson as trustworthy as any other of their tools. Yet, since it does not merely provide a sharper hearing, but perhaps a broader knowledge of symptoms, there will undoubtedly be doctors who will feel threatened by it and reject it.

However, if history has thought us anything, is that we need to be flexible and learn to use the smarter tools at our disposal. So the Cloud is here to stay and Watson will certainly be just the first super computer to change the way specialists around the globe do things.

By Luchi Gabriel Manescu

Cloud Music And The Radio Star

Cloud Music And The Radio Star

Cloud Music And The Radio Star

As far as music lovers are concerned, there are two options available for listening to tunes: the radio or a device that must loaded with music. For loading a device with a personal playlist, this is achieved by recording a list of songs on some media and it involves carrying some electronic device. The cloud computing revolution has given audiophiles everywhere the ability to listen to the music want to hear, anywhere there is an internet connection.

With the advent of cloud music storage, consumers can upload their music to a cloud server and access their songs via an internet connected device. The service is usually free up to a point and this does require some sort of ripping software to convert the song title from a portable media or downloading music from an online music source. As well, the music choices depend on the actions of the client – they listen to whatever they upload.

What if it was possible to have access to music without such effort? Pandora Radio offers this service to clients by creating a personalized radio streaming station based on the listener’s chosen criteria. While a client may chose a particular artist, the station creation is based on metrics that include similar sounding artists and not just streaming all music from the searched criteria. The service is free, if a subscriber is willing to listen to pre-recorded ads, or a subscriber can upgrade to a monthly fee to avoid the ads. The service can be accessed via an internet connected television or mobile device, and when that mobile device is paired with some of the latest models of vehicles, you have a solid contender to satellite radio.

Just recently, Microsoft entered the music streaming field by launching Xbox Music. With characteristics from both the music storage world and from the internet radio streaming world, Xbox Music offers a broader choice of options available for subscribers. Like Pandora, the service is free, with ads, or ad free for a monthly price. Unlike Pandora, however, Xbox Music will be available to 22 countries, as opposed to Pandora’s three countries of availability. As well, Microsoft has plans to expand beyond just the Xbox, imagining the possibilities with the Apple OS and Android OS.

Will this new technology be the death knell for radio DJ’s everywhere? Probably not, but it certainly will be a catalyst for changing the way consumers acquire a listening library.

By Robin Berry

Cloud Infographic: Safeguarding The Internet

Cloud Infographic: Safeguarding The Internet

Cloud Infographic: Safeguarding The Internet

While we are all very happy about the entire cloud data storage concept and feel that it’s a breath of relief from the constant battle against malware, key loggers, PC monitoring software, and whatnot, we tend to forget that there are steps which we need to take to ensure security even after we have shifted all our digital luggage to the cloud.  Read the 10 steps that will make your life on the cloud a smooth experience.

 

Infographic Source:  Verisign

 

Cloud Whitepaper: Choosing A Cloud Hosting Provider With Confidence

Cloud Whitepaper: Choosing A Cloud Hosting Provider With Confidence

Choosing A Cloud Hosting Provider with Confidence

Introduction

Cloud computing is rapidly transforming the IT landscape, and the conversation around adopting cloud technology has progressed from “if” to “when .” Enterprises are showing strong interest in outsourced (“public”) cloud offerings that can help them reduce costs and increase business agility.  These cloud services offer enormous economic benefits but they also pose significant potential risks for enterprises that must safeguard corporate information assets while complying with a myriad of industry and government regulations.

Many cloud service providers can deliver the security that enterprises need and SSL (secure sockets layer) certificates are part of the solution. More specifically, SSL is the solution for securing data when it is in motion.  The goal of this white paper is to help enterprises make pragmatic decisions about where and when to use cloud solutions by outlining specific issues that enterprises should raise with hosting providers before selecting a vendor, and by highlighting the ways in which SSL from a trusted Certificate Authority (CA) can help enterprises conduct business in the cloud with confidence.

Cloud Computing:

For the enterprise, cloud services offer lower IT capital expenditures and operating costs, on-demand capacity with self-service provisioning, and pay-per-use pricing models for greater flexibility and agility.  The service provider, in turn, achieves exponentially greater economies of scale by providing a standardized set of computing resources to a large base of customers.  Many enterprise hosting providers are already well positioned in the market and have the core competencies (people, processes, technology) to deliver the promise of cloud computing to the enterprise.

Despite the clear economic benefits of using cloud services, concerns about security, compliance and data privacy have slowed enterprise adoption.  An IDC survey of IT executives reveals that security is the #1 challenge facing IT cloud  services. Gartner Research has identified seven specific areas of security risk  associated with enterprise cloud computing, and recommends that organizations address several key issues when selecting a cloud hosting provider:

• Access privileges – Cloud service providers should be able to demonstrate they enforce adequate hiring, oversight and access controls to enforce administrative delegation.

• Regulatory compliance – Enterprises are accountable for their own data even when it’s in a public cloud, and should ensure their providers are ready and willing to undergo audits.

• Data provenance – When selecting a provider, ask where their datacenters are located and if they can commit to specific privacy requirements.

• Data segregation – Most public clouds are shared environments, and it is critical to make sure hosting providers can guarantee complete data segregation for secure multi-tenancy.

• Data recovery – Enterprises must make sure their hosting provider has the ability to do a complete restoration in the event of a disaster.

• Monitoring and reporting – Monitoring and logging public cloud activity is hard to do, so enterprises should ask for proof that their hosting providers can support investigations.

• Business continuity – Businesses come and go, and enterprises should ask hard questions about the portability of their data to avoid lock-in or potential loss if  the business fails.

Read Full Report

 

Important IaaS Cloud Industry Platforms Worth Knowing

Important IaaS Cloud Industry Platforms Worth Knowing

Every now and then one often hears of a new terminology in the cloud platforms. As the industry grows by leaps and bounds, it is hardly necessary to expect nothing short of dramatic and innovative changes. In this wave of developments, the established companies bask in all the glory while the new fish in the pond try to surface to the ground. Still, the latter are providing an alternative platform that might be revolutionizing the Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) scene by their open-ended technologies.

Before introducing the new giants in the field of IaaS that one may not be familiar with, it is important to give the perfect example of such a platform.

EC2

This is the quintessential platform in the IaaS circles, owned and partitioned by Amazon. It has many brainchildren in the industry that are specializing in any of its virtualization arms, such as, that of taking software as hardware to help feature two operating systems in one machine. However, its essence lies in making servers a cheap provision that companies need not count as part of their capital expenses. They only have to use the remote servers from the provider while keying in only the operational cost, not at a fixed fee but for as long as they use it. Talk about the wage system in the cloud infrastructure!

The other important but still obscure industry examples include the following three:

ENKI

It is a bet that many stakeholders in the industry may not be familiar with this provider of IaaS facilitation. It is a good ground for closeted organizations that want to begin their own independent datacenters that are both reliable and high-end. Just like many private cloud offerings, it has backup infrastructural provisions, which it does on a regular basis. It also comes with a definitive firewall that can safeguard a site’s activities against the outside world. Needless to say, it is as scalable as any other provision worthy of being a cloud offering.

Cloudscaling

This is not an unknown platform per se, but the fact is that it is more specialized in nature, attracting government bodies, organizations and other independent entities because it helps to make the cloud more open source. Its main goal is to offer a starting point for anybody who does not have resources for initiating their own personal cloud. Unlike before when IT departments had to search far and wide to look for a public provider, now they can effortlessly manage complicated software, hosting and safety models that their organizations demand using this infrastructure. This service is open-ended, and a good example of how to scale up an entity by remote means.

Savvis

Though the company of the above name has been in existence for long, offering a plethora of compute assistance, its cloud imprint called Savvis is a 2011 brainchild. Its main objective is to get e-commerce companies up and running and help them get way from enslavement to high capital Information Technology demands. With little money to run the show, users can help run their businesses, enhance utility and even come up with new applications within their cloud infrastructure.

There are a dozen more infrastructural platforms in the cloud computing sector but only a few of them provide IaaS whole-heartedly. The perfect example is GoGrid, whose dedication never wavers from the infrastructural part of things. The others usually combine their software, data and platform motifs with that of infrastructure. However, it is notable that now the computing world is all the better for it since there is a range of choices once the cloud bug hits an ambitious entity.

By John Omwamba

The Future Gets Closer To An Intelligent Car: Or Is It Just A Passing Cloud?

The Future Gets Closer To An Intelligent Car: Or Is It Just A Passing Cloud?

Though Internet technology inside vehicles has come up pretty recently, 2008 or so, the look of things is changing rapidly in the auto industry in that vein. Cloud computing is quickly becoming a part of automobile blueprints in major assembly plants. One of the oldest makers of automobiles in the United States that began its operations after the first Model-T discovery in 1910 has already signaled a future of an intelligent car.

The vehicle will not only have the usual applications that are becoming commonplace like GPS monitoring systems, but may have psychic technology that can deduce what the owner is feeling. According to this particular auto manufacturer, plans are underway to bring about a car that will even sense when one is under the flu and needs to get to hospital. It will turn the automatic on and veer to the nearest healthcare facility by aid of stored direction memory or Google Maps. Of course this is a little overboard for no such vehicle exists as yet, but the assembly plant in question is already showing these marvels in its cloud computing center in three-dimensional video productions.

Whether the intelligent cars come to pass is not what is important but how the contemporary technology can help to achieve this goal. Already there are a few leaps for mankind that the auto industry, in partnership with cloud computing experts, has made.

These include:

1. Automating the atmospheric conditions inside a vehicle whereby the machine will be setting an interior temperature as soon as it senses the owner is approaching.
2. Use of voice commands that the system will decode and help to operate the vehicle, hands-free.
3. Storing of anything important to the car owner like traffic information, licensing resources, music and movies far away in a server to save space.

All the above trends have, in one way or another, helped to demystify the cloud and make it become a household terminology. In fact, the advent of voice commands that vehicles will decode to shift to the left or right lanes may even turn the automotives into cell phones with mobility. Just like it is robbing the desktop computer its virtual right as home to the cloud, the automobile may soon be denying the Smartphone its reign as a handheld device.

The fact that data will now be available offshore for the driver to access, whether it is family or professional, also points out to a future of intelligent interactions. The vehicle may even come to sense that the driver is in the middle of business when driving and park by the side of the road of itself. If the three hundred and sixty degrees screening media that the auto makers with an interest in the cloud are using to demonstrate how they want to transform the industry is anything to go by, then car owners should brace themselves for a virtual future.

Though adjusting temperature in the interior may be an act of presetting something just like an alarm, every discerning person has to acknowledge that it has some element of artificial intelligence in it. The fact that the vehicle senses that the driver is about to disembark may be a sign that technology has advanced to more than just manual adjustment of memory settings. It is quite a zany idea to think that one’s beloved car is waiting impatiently for the master to come and drive it away.

As a matter of fact, the sketchy details surrounding ‘impossible’ fetes in the car industry are not just a passing cloud. Cloud computing has already prepared the ground through visible applications that are turning vehicles into moving computers and phones. The only thing they cannot be, and quite convenient at that, is become servers.

By John Omwamba

The Cloud: Focusing On Cloud Performance – Part 2

The Cloud: Focusing On Cloud Performance – Part 2

Continued from Part 1

Companies are usually recommended to do a workload analysis exercise before deciding on moving a process to the cloud and choosing a provider. For vendors it is, again, critical to understand in both business and computational terms (like number of records, size distributions, CPU and memory consumptions) the loads of the companies they wish to serve. While this may sound obvious, the outcome of a study conducted by the IEEE will explain why it needs to be articulated. The study published in November 2010, Performance Analysis of Cloud Computing Services for Many-Tasks Scientific Computing, found that the major four cloud computing commercial services were an order of magnitude less in performance to be useful for the scientific community. It is understandable that the cloud was not designed specifically for the scientific community in the first place. Yet nothing prevented cloud services from being touted as viable alternatives to grids and clusters for the scientific community. This study, while seemingly unconnected to industry, may still offer the relevant message to potential cloud service vendors. The cloud should be designed to cater to the workload. And perhaps, for related reasons, it will be good to have clouds for specific tasks or industries. Another observation of the study that should not be lost on us is that virtualization and resource time sharing add significant performance overheads. Such overheads should be thoroughly assessed at the providing data center. Current practices do not do more workload processing for less hardware. On the contrary, due to overheads of virtualization, more hardware is required than would be for doing the job by hardware installed at individual companies. However, savings could result from using hardware resources that would not be used except during peak loads in the case of individual installations.

The Cisco Global Cloud Index provides forecasts for IP traffic and guidance for both vendors and communities dependent on networks. Such forecasts are invaluable for both cloud and network providers. The forecasts seem to be based on current applications that are moved to the cloud even though the Cisco forecast does mention that by 2015 about 50 percent of all workloads will be catered by cloud data centers. Sizable workloads, such as order fulfillment for a major retailer or an OSS application for a telecom provider, could easily throw off such forecasts, when added to the cloud. The study indicates a very useful point: as more applications move to the cloud, more traffic that would remain within a data center would be moved to the Internet. Also, redundancy and availability features that are so asked for of the cloud will cause more traffic to be routed through the Internet. Online transaction-intensive workloads need tons of network bandwidth. For these reasons and many more it is important for a cloud provider to quantitatively assess the traffic that would be generated through its offering. Hence the cloud provider needs to work with the network providers, give them the assessments, and ensure that network bandwidth and capacity is available prior to having the offering up and running in the scale required. This might be dismissed as superfluous in the light of techniques meant to allow elastic IP capacity, but is still a required exercise to quantify the size of the task at hand in network terms and evaluate if network providers can match such size—with or without such techniques.

The performance-related promises that the cloud has to offer should not slacken subscribing companies’ interest in understanding their own performance requirements thoroughly and completely. While the onus of performance has indeed shifted to the vendor, having a grip over their requirements is still needed. Traditionally, understanding the performance requirements of client companies has been a weak link between clients and vendors. In cloud environments this link could snap altogether. Peak business loads and volumes and average usage patterns should be known to both. Expectations, such as application response times and operational constraints (such as time windows available for batches), should also be known to both. Well-understood requirements not only help define meaningful SLAs between the client and provider but, when provided earlier, can help the provider design robust offerings.

By Suri Chitti

Suri Chitti (suri_chitti@hotmail.com) is a software and technology management professional. He has packed many years of experience and insight having worked in different industrial domains, for different stakeholders like companies, vendors and consultancies and has contributed to different aspects of software production like functional analysis, testing, design and management. 

CloudTweaks Comics
Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment? Find Out

Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment? Find Out

ERP Deployment You know how ERP deployment can improve processes within your supply chain, and the things to keep in mind when implementing an ERP system. But do you know if cloud-based or on-premise ERP deployment is better for your company or industry? While cloud computing is becoming more and more popular, it is worth…

Cloud Computing Checklist For Startups

Cloud Computing Checklist For Startups

Checklist For Startups  There are many people who aspire to do great things in this world and see new technologies such as Cloud computing and Internet of Things as a tremendous offering to help bridge and showcase their ideas. The Time Is Now This is a perfect time for highly ambitious startups to make some…

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

DDoS Attacks October 21st, 2016 went into the annals of Internet history for the large scale Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks that made popular Internet properties like Twitter, SoundCloud, Spotify and Box inaccessible to many users in the US. The DDoS attack happened in three waves targeting DNS service provider Dyn, resulting in a total of about…

Infographic Introduction – Benefits of Cloud Computing

Infographic Introduction – Benefits of Cloud Computing

Benefits of Cloud Computing Based on Aberdeen Group’s Computer Intelligence Dataset, there are more than 1.6 billion permutations to choose from when it comes to cloud computing solutions. So what, on the face of it, appears to be pretty simple is actually both complex and dynamic regardless of whether you’re in the market for networking,…

The Industries That The Cloud Will Change The Most

The Industries That The Cloud Will Change The Most

The Industries That The Cloud Will Change The Most Cloud computing is rapidly revolutionizing the way we do business. Instead of being a blurry buzzword, it has become a facet of everyday life. Most people may not quite understand how the cloud works, but electricity is quite difficult to fathom as well. Anyway, regardless of…

5 Essential Cloud Skills That Could Make Or Break Your IT Career

5 Essential Cloud Skills That Could Make Or Break Your IT Career

5 Essential Cloud Skills Cloud technology has completely changed the infrastructure and internal landscape of both small businesses and large corporations alike. No professionals in any industry understand this better than IT pros. In a cutthroat field like IT, candidates have to be multi-faceted and well-versed in the cloud universe. Employers want to know that…

The Big Data Movement Gets Bigger

The Big Data Movement Gets Bigger

The Big Data Movement In recent years, Big Data and Cloud relations have been growing steadily. And while there have been many questions raised around how best to use the information being gathered, there is no question that there is a real future between the two. The growing importance of Big Data Scientists and the…

Protecting Your Web Applications In A Hybrid Cloud Environment

Protecting Your Web Applications In A Hybrid Cloud Environment

Protecting Your Web Applications It’s no secret that organizations are embracing the cloud and all the benefits that it entails. Whether its cost savings, increased flexibility or enhanced productivity – businesses around the world are leveraging the cloud to scale their business and better serve their customers. They are using a variety of cloud solutions…

The Business of Security: Avoiding Risks

The Business of Security: Avoiding Risks

The Business of Security Security is one of those IT concerns that aren’t problematic until disaster strikes. It might be tomorrow, it could be next week or next year. The fact is that poor security leaves businesses wide open for data loss and theft. News outlets just skim the surface, but hackers cost business up…

The Future Of Cybersecurity

The Future Of Cybersecurity

The Future of Cybersecurity In 2013, President Obama issued an Executive Order to protect critical infrastructure by establishing baseline security standards. One year later, the government announced the cybersecurity framework, a voluntary how-to guide to strengthen cybersecurity and meanwhile, the Senate Intelligence Committee voted to approve the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA), moving it one…

Using Private Cloud Architecture For Multi-Tier Applications

Using Private Cloud Architecture For Multi-Tier Applications

Cloud Architecture These days, Multi-Tier Applications are the norm. From SharePoint’s front-end/back-end configuration, to LAMP-based websites using multiple servers to handle different functions, a multitude of apps require public and private-facing components to work in tandem. Placing these apps in entirely public-facing platforms and networks simplifies the process, but at the cost of security vulnerabilities. Locating everything…

The Cancer Moonshot: Collaboration Is Key

The Cancer Moonshot: Collaboration Is Key

Cancer Moonshot In his final State of the Union address in January 2016, President Obama announced a new American “moonshot” effort: finding a cure for cancer. The term “moonshot” comes from one of America’s greatest achievements, the moon landing. If the scientific community can achieve that kind of feat, then surely it can rally around…

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Cloud Email Migration In today’s litigious society, preserving your company’s data is a must if you (and your legal team) want to avoid hefty fines for data spoliation. But what about when you move to the cloud? Of course, you’ve probably thought of this already. You’ll have a migration strategy in place and you’ll carefully…

Maintaining Network Performance And Security In Hybrid Cloud Environments

Maintaining Network Performance And Security In Hybrid Cloud Environments

Hybrid Cloud Environments After several years of steady cloud adoption in the enterprise, an interesting trend has emerged: More companies are retaining their existing, on-premise IT infrastructures while also embracing the latest cloud technologies. In fact, IDC predicts markets for such hybrid cloud environments will grow from the over $25 billion global market we saw…

Cloud-Based Services vs. On-Premises: It’s About More Than Just Dollars

Cloud-Based Services vs. On-Premises: It’s About More Than Just Dollars

Cloud-Based Services vs. On-Premises The surface costs might give you pause, but the cost of diminishing your differentiators is far greater. Will a shift to the cloud save you money? Potential savings are historically the main business driver cited when companies move to the cloud, but it shouldn’t be viewed as a cost-saving exercise. There…

Data Breaches: Incident Response Planning – Part 1

Data Breaches: Incident Response Planning – Part 1

Incident Response Planning – Part 1 The topic of cybersecurity has become part of the boardroom agendas in the last couple of years, and not surprisingly — these days, it’s almost impossible to read news headlines without noticing yet another story about a data breach. As cybersecurity shifts from being a strictly IT issue to…

Adopting A Cohesive GRC Mindset For Cloud Security

Adopting A Cohesive GRC Mindset For Cloud Security

Cloud Security Mindset Businesses are becoming wise to the compelling benefits of cloud computing. When adopting cloud, they need a high level of confidence in how it will be risk-managed and controlled, to preserve the security of their information and integrity of their operations. Cloud implementation is sometimes built up over time in a business,…

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

Individuals and Password-Sharing With the 1980s came the explosion of computing. In 1980, the Commodore ushered in the advent of home computing. Time magazine declared 1982 was “The Year of the Computer.” By 1983, there were an estimated 10 million personal computers in the United States alone. As soon as computers became popular, the federal government…

Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

The True Meaning of Availability What is real availability? In our line of work, cloud service providers approach availability from the inside out. And in many cases, some never make it past their own front door given how challenging it is to keep the lights on at home let alone factors that are out of…