Category Archives: Technology

IIA Report Infographic: Mobile Shopping Statistics

IIA Report Infographic: Mobile Shopping Statistics

Mobile Shopping Statistics

The internet has been blowing up in recent years and offering people things they never thought possible. Not only that, but a new report from the Internet Innovation Alliance says mobile shopping can save you a ton of money too.

In fact, the report has indicated that the average American family can save more than $11,000 a year on household spending thanks to the internet. This is due to the fact that there are many significant opportunities to save money on the internet, especially around the holidays. Certified financial planner Nicholas Delgado says “Getting caught up in the holiday spirit doesn’t mean you have to overspend on Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Eve, to name a few,” said Delgado. “Thankfully, broadband delivers a significant return on investment with valuable opportunities for deal comparison, group-buying, and online-only discounts that make it easier to stick to a budget…

Since 2010, the IIA has recorded savings that are internet-enabled in a number of different categories. Their data comes from the annual Consumer Expenditure Survey from the Bureau of Labor and Statistics. The possible savings have skyrocketed from around $7000 in 2010, to well over $11,000 this year. You can find big savings on anything from clothing, to apparel, to health insurance and more.

The biggest savings are in the areas of entertainment, housing and automotive. The report found that you can save upwards of $3,000 in each of these categories.  (Included is an infographic by the IIA providing a further breakdown)

Mobile Shopping Statistics

Compared to IIA’s financial analysis last year, the greatest increases in savings opportunities emerged in Housing (23.50% in 2015, compared to 16.53% in 2014) and News (54.05% in 2015, compared to 39.29% in 2014). However, the percentage of savings on food (12.65% in 2015, compared to 25.68% in 2014), apparel (44.84% in 2015, compared to 62.55% in 2014) and gasoline (2.05% in 2015, compared to 12.28% in 2014) dipped. Of note, in 2015 spending on gasoline decreased by 15.32%, down from $2,468.00 the year prior.

Holiday season is spending season — from buying presents to traveling for vacations and family visits,” commented IIA Co-Chairman Jamal Simmons. “Luckily, savvy use of broadband tools can help families get more for their money.” Of the 180 million U.S. adults expecting to shop Black Friday week through Cyber Monday this year, 114 million plan to shop online and 70 percent will use mobile devices, according to a new Consumer Technology Association (CTA) survey.

Simmons added, “Encouraging investment in 5G technology that will extend broadband to all Americans, from urban centers to rural areas, should be a top priority for policymakers...”

These are impressive numbers and are surely to only keep rising in the coming years as more people flock to using the internet to save money.

Kale Havervold

Cloud Access Security Broker and the Cloud-based Business Role

Cloud Access Security Broker and the Cloud-based Business Role

Cloud Access Security Broker (CASB)

Cloud is the new address for businesses nowadays. The number of applications, hosted on the cloud, is rapidly increasing and that contributes in the streamlining of various business operations. Accounting applications, PBX, ERP, and CRM, etc. are some of the business applications that bring in more convenience and efficiency with the touch of the Cloud.

Cloud hosted applications can modernize the way businesses connect –be it employee connectivity or customer retention strategies. With the ability of cross-integrating different applications, cloud provides a more able and productive platform to deliver enhanced business solutions. On the other side, this ability arrives with some valuable business data, concerning to customers, employees, and several other parties. So, any lack of security on these nodes can make way for some dreadful consequences.

Cloud Access Security Broker

Businesses are willing to move to the cloud to enjoy smoother operations, but that should not come at the cost of security vulnerabilities. This need of security leads to the rise in demand for Cloud Access Security Broker (CASB) products.

CASB – Definition & Basic Importance

In simpler interpretation, CASB can be defined as dedicated security points deployed between cloud server and the user device. They together enable a highly secure and protected line of access for exchange of information for cloud applications by enforcing better authorization, encryption, loss-protection, vulnerability-detection, etc. CASB introduces innovative access, control, and monitoring solution for the enterprises to meet the rising business necessities, such as – BYOD, real-time collaboration, permission-restricted user access, etc.

Think of it as a third-party security broker hired to safeguard the application data during the transmission from premise to the cloud. Businesses strive to maintain data security at the user-end while cloud providers are burning candles at all ends to mitigate the security flaws. The gap between them remains susceptible. Implementing CASB will secure the gap between them and eventually, the overall cloud system will become secured.

The importance of CASB can be judged with the prediction of Gartner that states close to 85% of the large enterprises will have CASB product in action, by 2020. Currently, less than 5% of enterprises have these services in action. So, the coming years are all set to see a tremendous rise in the number of CASB implementation. This improved level of security will also allow the developers to deliver more productive applications on the cloud.

What CASB Can Do For Business Applications

Cloud security has grown by leaps and jumps in the recent years. But it may still have certain weaknesses and anyone with the proper knowledge and malicious intent can hack their way into the system and wreak havoc. A cloud-based business service, such as – Hosted PBX, can carry crucial details of your business like call logs, client contact details, call recording, etc. Such information cannot be compromised upon by the business. So, there is demand for more reliable security measure – CASB. CASB ceases the flaws that exist between the local device and the cloud server. Mitigating those errors, cloud can be even more reliable solutions for business, as well as the end-user.

Here is what CASB has to offer:

1. Application Governance

Applications governance refers to understanding and the controlling of permissions associated with the Cloud hosted applications. To help this cause, CASB enforces an enhanced credential mapping, encryption, device profiling, and policy classification. These actions help better application detailing and boosting the security points accordingly. It is very much like a personalized security setup for the application. Regardless if its a soft-phone, tax software, or any other Cloud hosted application, CASB will offer special security governance as per the need of application.

2. Access Monitoring

security watch

Better access monitoring ensures that every attempt made to access the application is detected and duly logged. By defining the access permissions on the basis of recent and usual log in activities of the users in an intense manner for different users (support agent, customer, manager, etc.), they are restricted to access only the permitted data and hence, shielding the key data from the different users. CASB utilizes various methods, such as- single sign-on, authentication, authorization, logging, etc. to monitor the accessed application.

3. Controlled Safekeeping

Different CASB products have various boosted security measures that help them detect and prevent any malware intrusions. To keep such attempts at bay, they are even able to offer them non-sensitive (worthless) data to steal away using the ‘tokenization technique’. So, attempts for the data intrusion can be mitigated without much damage.

Wrapping It Up

Cloud computing is considered one of the finest examples of technical advancements as it offers on-the-go solutions without any restrictions of the device platforms. Cloud dependent services, such as – application hosting, VoIP, etc. have eased the data control element for businesses and enhanced the productivity measures. The technology has advanced to offer high-on-quality and low-on-expense solutions. However, the challenges associated with data security has often restricted the Cloud from being a supremely accepted option for businesses. Implementation of CASB products promises a near-perfect security for the cloud setup. But the fingers are kept crossed for now as the service is yet to face the real usage testing.

By Kirti Khanna

Common Cloud Mistakes – And How To Avoid Them

Common Cloud Mistakes – And How To Avoid Them

Common Cloud Mistakes

One of the first lessons in order to avoid common cloud mistakes with anyone entering the tech field learns is that nothing is as simple as it appears to be at first glance. That lesson goes double for companies implementing a hybrid-cloud strategy. Yes, it is possible to achieve the “best of both worlds” ideal of public-cloud efficiency combined with private-cloud security and control. Just don’t expect to get it perfectly right on your first try. Take some tips from those who have been there, done that, and then done it again the right way.

The first mistake made by many cloud-computing neophytes is choosing the wrong cloud. No, the cloud isn’t this monolithic entity that you simply plug into like a power outlet. In a November 2016 article on TechTarget, Marc Staimer identifies six different kinds of public-cloud storage:

  • Block storage is local embedded disk or SAN storage best suited for high-performance applications.
  • File and NAS storage work best for apps requiring NFS or SMB protocols.
  • Three different types of object storage are available for active archiving, cool archiving, and cold archiving.
  • Tape storage, usually in the form of a linear tape file system, is also used for cold archiving.

Block storage provides the lowest latency and the highest IOPS and throughput, but it is also the most expensive form of cloud storage, priced as much as 30 times more than active or cool archival storage. At the other extreme, cold archive storage costs as little as one cent per gigabyte, but it can take hours for users to access the data, and some providers charge up to 12 times the storage cost to read more than a small amount of the archived data.

On the other side of the hybrid-cloud connection, it can be just as difficult to select the optimal form of on-premises storage:

  • A primary NAS or SAN storage system replicates snapshots or tiers of data to public-cloud storage based on the policy you determine.
  • A gateway or cloud integrated storage (CIS) works like NAS or SAN storage by caching data locally and moving the bulk to cloud storage based on policy; it leaves a stub that makes public-cloud data appear to be stored locally.
  • An on-premises object storage system offers the same de facto interface as public-cloud storage, or alternatively, it extends to the public interface, replicating data based on policy, similar to the way it is done in a NAS or SAN system.
  • The existing NAS or SAN storage setup can be augmented with archive or backup software that copies data to the public cloud based on the policy you set.

CIS systems are generally the most cost-effective option, but only if the correct amount of data is cached locally to avoid frequent calls to the cloud. Object storage can be much simpler to integrate with cloud services, so long as your apps don’t require a high level of performance. Object storage can also conflict with some subsets of Amazon Web Services Simple Storage Service (S3) interface. Likewise, recovering and restoring data from the cloud requires a physical or virtual media server in the public cloud itself, which is far from a given.

Expert consensus: Focus on goals, not cloud tech, and keep it simple

Cloud technologies change faster than the weather, which means it can be a mistake to become overly committed to a single platform or toolset. The first bit of advice offered by Forbes’ Dan Woods is to identify the cloud features that will improve your business and then become proficient in them rather than trying to become an expert on cloud technologies generally. No organization needs all the capabilities offered by AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud, and other vendors. Find the handful of specific cloud services that promise to deliver the biggest return for your business needs and focus on them initially.

common cloud mistakes

“Cloud platforms such as OpenStack can be difficult to deploy and manage, but 90 percent of the reasons cited for project failures are related to people and processes rather than to technology…” Source: Gartner, via the RackSpace blog

C-level executives are likely to rank cost savings at or near the top of the list of reasons why they’re interested in cloud computing. That is the second big common cloud mistake that companies make when formulating their cloud strategies, according to Woods: neglecting to value the cloud’s ability to help the organization achieve its goals. The role of IT is being transformed as IT functions become integrated with business departments, and IT itself becomes just as business-focused as the rest of the company.

This leads directly to the third common cloud mistake: “forklifting” your internal infrastructure onto a cloud platform with little or no effort to optimize your apps and other systems for the cloud’s best features: extensibility, efficiency, resiliency, and scalability. Initially, your big concern is getting your operations up and running on the cloud infrastructure, not doing so in a way that maximizes the cloud’s capabilities. Eventually, the only way the cloud will prove to be cost-effective is if you make the adjustments required to match your apps, databases, and other resources to the best features cloud services have to offer.

See cloud services as partners rather than vendors

IT is far from the only department affected by cloud computing. The nature of the relationship between the company and the service provider is changing fundamentally as well. According to TheCsuite’s Andrew Peddie, one of the top mistakes companies make when choosing a cloud service is treating it as a buyer/seller relationship. Any cloud project has a better chance of success if you see it as a partnership and collaboration with the cloud provider.

common cloud mistakes

“Cloud computing has had the greatest impact on the role of chief information officers, but all areas of the organization have been affected by cloud-driven changes…” Source: SpencerStuart

Peddie warns against underestimating the length of time required to complete cloud projects. To avoid unnecessary delays, evaluate only a handful of potential cloud partners rather than casting a wide net. Conduct interviews in person rather than over the phone. Have your decision-making process in place before you need it, and make sure your agreement includes long-term protection against future price increases.

When it comes to developing, managing, and protecting your company’s vital digital assets, there has never been a better time to embrace the changes presented by the cloud and its related technologies. The effort required for your organization to realize the benefits of cloud computing doesn’t have to be daunting, particularly if you learn from the lessons of those who have tangled with the cloud, and lived to tell the tale.

By Brian Wheeler

When The Cloud Comes To The Black Friday Table

When The Cloud Comes To The Black Friday Table

Black Friday

table-black-friday

Black Friday, as most people know, is the busiest shopping day of the year, occurring immediately after U.S. Thanksgiving, and ushering in the “official” beginning of the Christmas/Holiday shopping season. Its name has come to represent the time of the year at which most retailers start to turn a profit (operating in the black), as opposed to running at a loss (in the red) as they have been doing since January 1. Although this dire financial situation does not apply to all retailers everywhere, it is no surprise that the onslaught of aggressive, deal-hungry shoppers delivers a fresh wave of commerce and cash, much like a coastal ocean swell replenishing a tide pool.

Cloud technology has a major role to play in supporting the activities of the Black Friday weekend of course, first by managing the spike in commercial transactions that happens on the Friday and the weekend, and then secondly in coordinating the online sales that occur on the following “Cyber Monday,” a relatively more recent tradition in which shoppers turn to online retailers to complete the shopping they could not finish over the weekend. Retailers the world over now rely on the cloud to fulfill every element of the retail process from the pre-season wholesale ordering of goods through to post-sale delivery and customer service, and everything in between.

Though, Black Friday still seems to be a retail-oriented phenomenon, aimed squarely at consumers – the public – the B2C arena. Seasonal deals in the business-to-business (B2B) sphere are few and far between, and seem relegated to the primary levels of the industry, such as the occasional cloud hosting or web page-hosting provider offering up extra space for any new customers that sign up on this special weekend.

Cloud Black Friday

How long might it be before the world sees “Black Friday” sales on a higher-level? A cloud industry level? For a start, the increased awareness of the need for high-performance cloud technology in support of this busy retail season can easily translate into a plethora of conversations about robust cloud technology in areas such as analytics, security, application development and migration.

If one were to accept the notion that Black Friday was thus named for the arrival of profits, rather than losses in a storekeeper’s books, then today’s retail madness was actually born out of an accounting term. If the world can translate an event from “accounting” to “shopping”, then it might be just as easy to reconfigure the Black Friday concept from “retail” to “industry”.

Selling cloud technology is a big and very tangible business, as can be seen by the number of major trade shows and events that occur around the world, hosted in huge convention centers and attracting thousands of delegates. Although virtualization may be a central theme of cloud, there are still many solid parts to the machines behind it, and these need to be seen, touched and experienced by business buyers.

Although cloud has no season, techniques for selling cloud technology follow the same traditions as selling cars, phones and video games: newer equals better, cheaper, sexier, with more features and greater reliability. Cloud technology has made great strides in separating itself from old-school mainframe ideologies, through its current marketing approaches and its open-source attitude. Very soon, as in a couple of years soon, it is highly likely that the new generation of business-to-business will take a page from its retail sibling and start to sell its wares seasonally.

(Updated and edited: November 24th, 2016)

By Steve Prentice

3 Major Concerns For Cloud Computing In 2017

3 Major Concerns For Cloud Computing In 2017

Cloud Computing Concerns

With the rise of cloud computing, different concerns about adopting the cloud have arisen over the years. In 2016, the top concerns are pretty similar to previous years, though some have become higher or lower priority as the understanding of cloud computing has changed. Three of the top cloud computing concerns going into 2017, according to Corpinfo,  have been a lack of resources/expertise, security, and cost control, all of which can lead to an avoidance of cloud computing, even if would ultimately be helpful for an organization.

Lack of Resources/Expertise

Cloud Computing Concerns

“To me, it is telling that the cloud has become so complex and evolved so quickly that even professional IT workers and CIOs cannot always get their heads around what is possible…” Jonathan Hassell, CIO

The top concern for 2016, even over security, is a lack of resources/expertise in the field of cloud computing. This can be attributed to several factors: lack of training, multiple and varied cloud vendors, and the addition of hybrid clouds. Training for cloud expertise can be somewhat difficult to find, and the lack of many standards and certifications also makes it hard to know when someone has the needed expertise. The numerous cloud vendors that can all use different terminology, and all have different strengths. Depending on what your needs are, one company may be better than another, but you could go with one that is not optimal if you are not aware of these differences. Also, adding hybrid cloud infrastructure into the mix can make it even more difficult to determine the best choice. Taking the time to find a good training for your employees could be an important step toward helping to get the proper expertise, which can be used to more effectively identify and properly make use of the best cloud service provider(s) for your company.

Security Concerns

Even though it isn’t at the top of the list for 2016, security is still solidly in second place. Many companies are concerned about cloud security, but modern cloud providers often do a good job of providing security on their end.

Cloud providers often take care of some of the tougher issues, such as keeping unwanted traffic outside a specific scope from accessing the machines on which your data and apps reside. They can also ensure automatic security updates are applied to their systems to help prevent recent security threats.

Given that cloud security has been a top concern for some time, it may be surprising that banking had the most cloud activity in 2013, which would seem to indicate that at least one sector that deals with highly sensitive customer information has had a great deal of confidence in security provided by cloud providers for some time. Keep in mind, though, that the quality of security does depend on the cloud provider, so be careful to perform the needed research on any cloud providers you may be considering.

Even though cloud providers tend to do a good job at security on their end, you must still be vigilant with your own internal security policies. Some security issues are outside the scope of a cloud provider, and you need to be sure to take proper precautions against such things.

xss-wordfence

For example, losing or misplacing a device that has access to your cloud could allow an outsider directly into your cloud administration, which could cause significant damage or losses. Another example would be an application vulnerability, such as an opening for SQL injection, cross-site scripting, or similar issues. An attacker can use such vulnerabilities to bypass otherwise excellent security measures. Keeping a good internal security policy is just as important as choosing the right cloud provider when it comes to mitigating security concerns.

Cost Control Concerns

Even though cost control is not one of the top three concerns, Corpinfo identified it as the fastest growing concern, so it may indeed move up the list quickly in the coming years.

While cloud adoption does in most cases save money over a data center, expenses can still add up quickly or be higher if the proper options for your situation are not chosen. This can be linked back to having a team with the necessary cloud experience and expertise to choose the proper cloud provider and to make use of the proper features to help ensure costs are kept at a minimum.

While all of these concerns are very real, they can all be dealt with if steps are taken to obtain good training and to keep a good security policy. So, when you are considering the move, be sure to take the proper precautions and bring in the needed expertise to ensure a successful transition.

By Brian Wheeler

Infographic: Mixed Hybrid Realities

Infographic: Mixed Hybrid Realities

Various Realities

It seems like just yesterday you were still wrapping your head around the fact VR is something that can potentially be influential, and now you learn that there’s AR and MR.

Here’s a quick queue card / guide / infographic by Futurism to help you make sense of all the various iterations of reality that are starting to exist in this one field.

Mixed Hybrid Realites

VR – Virtual Reality

This is probably the most well-known new reality. Unlike AR or MR, the computer-generated (3D) images and environments in a virtual reality require you to use special electronic equipment—most commonly helmets (with built-in screens) and motion sensitive gloves.

Virtual reality is completely digital, so there are some downsides (i.e your own environment messing with the mirage) to participating in this reality.

AR – Augmented Reality

The name is self-explanatory. Unlike Virtual Reality (VR), you’re not running away from the real world, in favor of a dreamlike state. In Augmented Reality (AR) a digital computer generated image is superimposed onto the real world. An example of Augmented Reality is the now infamous Tupac Shakur hologram which debuted at Coachella in 2012. Those who were physically present at Coachella couldn’t tell the difference—they thought Tupac was really alive—alas they later discovered this was simply a mirage.

MR – Mixed/Hybrid Reality

What happens when you take all the best elements of VR and the ingenuity of AR? You get Mixed Reality (MR)!

In this reality, the real world and the virtual world interact. It’s not like AR where the virtual world is visible in the real world—no. In Mixed Reality, the virtual world and the real world conspire to create a whole new paradigm.

Imagine that you’re dealing with case-law and need to find a specific keyword/precedent in a non-digital legal journal. Scanning the entire journal using MR (like Microsoft’s HoloLens) would allow you to narrow your search faster.

By Glenn Blake

Resolving the Normalization of Deviance by Building a Culture of Communication

Resolving the Normalization of Deviance by Building a Culture of Communication

Building a Culture of Communication

Real-time monitoring and corresponding alerts are critical for maintaining the performance and security of today’s complex cloud infrastructures. Given the exorbitant amount of data effective network monitoring can produce, however, a troublesome problem often occurs: organizations and their Security, Operations and Development teams start to develop a normalization of deviance.

What’s a Normalization of Deviance?

A normalization of deviance is an incremental and gradual erosion of normal procedures, and it can lead to dire consequences. The explosion of the Challenger space shuttle in 1986 is, unfortunately, an infamous example of a normalization of deviance (and the resultant investigation is where Diane Vaughn developed this theory). NASA had been testing the limits of the joints on its solid rocket boosters and found they weren’t behaving as expected. Rather than halting the development process and dealing with the booster errors head on, NASA chose to accept the problem and move forward with the launch. This normalization of deviance led to the Challenger tragedy, as it was later confirmed that the O-ring gaskets on one of the problematic boosters were responsible for the disaster.

Cloud Disaster Recovery

The lesson to learn here is that the normalization of deviance stemmed from an organizational failure at NASA at the management level. It’s also a common occurrence amongst fast-growth technology companies and enterprises that are rapidly scaling their cloud-based infrastructures and adapting their architectures to changing business needs. In these settings, more tools are required to monitor infrastructure as the business grows and evolves and compute needs adapt to keep up. With more tools come more data and alerts, and as a result, operators have to balance the signal-to-noise ratio to ensure their teams can focus on the most important inputs.

The Harmful Effects of Burnout

With alerts coming in from a variety of different systems and tools, Security, Operations and Development teams can sometimes feel as if they’re at an obnoxiously loud party, with dozens of people having different conversations about different things at the same time. Without a systematic approach to compensate for this chaos, these teams can become desensitized, so that even when the system flags a truly anomalous activity, the alert may get ignored.

Burnout can lead to longer response times, create an unmanageable volume of technical debt, and generally have a negative effect on a company’s workforce. Team members who are struggling to keep up with never-ending alerts can experience anxiety, sleep deprivation, cognitive impairment and even increased blood pressure or headaches. A normalization of deviance and resulting burnout can also lead to a lack of interest in solving problems or helping customers, and as a result, negatively impact company culture.

A helpful way to determine if there’s a normalization of deviance in your own company is to watch how existing team members interact with new hires. When a new hire asks about an incoming alert, does your team brush it off and dismiss the problem as nothing to worry about? If so, your team has likely developed the habit of accepting bad practices as normal. This happens. It’s not a reason to upend everything, but a signal that leaders need to discover early and begin corrective action.

How to Prevent Desensitization

Chef CTO Adam Jacobs directly addressed burnout at the 2016 ChefCon: “We should make a conscious and intentional choice to build the future we want to be a part of, with our technology and culture.”

The most effective and long-lasting way to prevent a normalization of deviance from permeating your company and Security, Operations and Development teams is simply to communicate more and ensure those teams are empowered to enact change in their tools and process where needed. The fatigue and numbness that can result from a normalization of deviance is usually easier to spot in others than in ourselves, so be on the lookout for team members who may be struggling. Have burnout and personal health be a regular topic of discussion in one-on-one meetings, and make sure everyone is transparent about how current business goals or customer demands are physically and mentally affecting different teams. Perhaps most importantly, recognize that combating the normalization of deviance requires continuous effort. It’s not a task you can check off and then ignore.

Fast-growth technology companies and their Security, Operations and Development teams are all focused on moving at warp speed, building new cloud-based features and making sure complex platforms scale. But it’s equally important to prioritize building a culture of communication, honesty and improvement in order to catch and prevent a normalization of deviance before it sets in. This negative behavior pattern needs to be addressed, not tolerated, to ensure your company’s security defenses remain ahead of any adversaries’ offensive maneuvers.

By Chris Gervais

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Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

There is a Difference – So Stop Comparing We are all familiar with the old saying “That’s like comparing apples to oranges” and though we learned this lesson during our early years we somehow seem to discount this idiom when discussing the Cloud. Specifically, IT buyers often feel justified when comparing the cost of a…

The Cancer Moonshot: Collaboration Is Key

The Cancer Moonshot: Collaboration Is Key

Cancer Moonshot In his final State of the Union address in January 2016, President Obama announced a new American “moonshot” effort: finding a cure for cancer. The term “moonshot” comes from one of America’s greatest achievements, the moon landing. If the scientific community can achieve that kind of feat, then surely it can rally around…

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Once upon a time, only a select few companies like Google and Salesforce possessed the knowledge and expertise to operate efficient cloud infrastructure and applications. Organizations patronizing those companies benefitted with apps that offered new benefits in flexibility, scalability and cost effectiveness. These days, the sharp division between cloud and on-premises infrastructure…