Category Archives: Technology

Tweaking Your SaaS Marketing To Instill Startup Growth

Tweaking Your SaaS Marketing To Instill Startup Growth

SaaS Marketing Growth

Primarily evidenced by the explosive growth several startups have managed, growth hacking is a successful development tool that’s achieved some acclaim in the last few years. One reason that startups specifically have been making use of growth hacking is the smaller budgets they contend with compelling a ‘ship and revise’ strategy. These startups will often send out their initial products early on, encourage early adopters to provide rigorous feedback, and then refine their products. Large, established organizations tend, instead, to consume hefty budgets for traditional marketing and launches, but this often means customers aren’t getting the functionality they want. And so, taking a leaf out of the startup book of marketing, most organizations could benefit from growth hacking and its accompanying devices.

Boiling Down Growth Hacking

Growth hacks are shortcuts or loopholes to growth, usually extremely high growth, of new products. They are low cost, often free, and rely on word of mouth. The best growth hacks take full advantage of digital and social media and go viral through satisfied users spreading the word. Data analysis, user feedback, and growth objectives are key to growth hacking, and just as effective implementation can mean tremendous success, so poor execution could end in disaster. Netflix, Twitter, Dropbox, Uber, Airbnb, Slack – all Cloud based SaaS examples of brands that have successfully hacked their growth. The list of failures is harder to dig up, but undoubtedly much longer.  

Below is an infographic discovered via pierrelechelle covering Slack’s growth which has now reached over 1 million active users with no end in site.


When Growth Hacking Doesn’t Work

Considering its ideals of creativity and ingenuity, growth hacking can be a risky device. Though they often seem like cheap and easy solutions, many growth hacks fizzle out long before they provide the necessary boost to the business. Three core hazards stand out:

  • They’re only there for the freebies

Getting the customers to your site is, of course, an essential goal, but if they’re just window shopping, your hacks aren’t successful. Without enough paying customers, no amount of positive word of mouth will do you any good, so be sure to turn visitors into committed subscribers. Website design is one quick-fix strategy for improving conversion rates, keeping navigation neat and intuitive, and including accessible copy. Make sure you’ve included one strong call to action that allows customers to spread the word via social media and ensure your sign-up is quick and easy.

  • Stats just aren’t your thing

If you’re not correctly measuring campaign results and then using that information to refine your efforts you’re wasting time and money. Fruitful growth hackers embrace a trial and error mindset that views failures as that paving stones to success and avidly experiment with their hacks. Track data, measure results, and answer questions; set a measurable goal and track your progress. A successful campaign provides data for scaling up the next campaign; a ‘failed’ campaign shows you how to adapt your next one.

  • A lead balloon

Creating hype is essential, but no amount of growth hacking hype can make a bad product look good. Quite the opposite. Growth hacking relies on positive consumer feedback, and if you’re delivering a product or service that disappoints, prospective users will vanish. Some suggest a 95% product investment, 5% marketing investment, ensuring your product is the best it can be, and organizations need to honestly and realistically evaluate product strengths and weaknesses so that they’re ready to work on the feedback they get. Growth hacking is valued by marketers and consumers alike because it is based on candid product communication and a loyal user base.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Most Active Internet Of Things Investors In The Last 5 Years

Most Active Internet Of Things Investors In The Last 5 Years

Most Active Internet Of Things Investors

A recent BI Intelligence report claimed that the Internet of Things (IoT) is on its way to becoming the largest device market in the world.

Quite naturally, such exponential growth of the IoT market has prompted a number of high-profile corporate investors and smart money VCs to bet highly on this comparatively still nascent industry.


A recently discovered CB Insight report via Twitter stated that the funding of  IoT startups has more than doubled over the last five years. Amongst the most active IoT startup investors since 2010 were Intel Capital at number one, followed by Qualcomm Ventures at the second spot.

Interestingly, the venture arms of both the tech giants have been particularly focused on sensor companies and wearable startups. Industry observers are of the view that because their core business model is heavily reliant on the design and manufacture of ever-smaller chips that power, both Intel and Qualcomm are more inclined to see IoT startups as strategic assets.

In 2015, Intel Capital led a particularly successful round to BodyLabs, a startup that deals in 3D body-scanning sensors. Apart from that, the company invested in Sano Intelligence, another fast-growing developer of biometric sensors.

Other IoT infrastructure startups that bagged rather lucrative investments from Intel Capital include Bocom Intelligent Network Technologies, SigFox, and Stratoscale.

Similarly, Qualcomm Ventures have also been showing great interest in emerging brands such as drone manufacturer 3D Robotics and Whistle Labs, a dog wearable manufacturer. In addition, the company also have invested in sensor networks made by Placemeter, Panoramic Power and Streetline.

Foundry Group and KPCB made it to the third rank in the list of top IoT investors. While Foundry Group seemed particularly focused on hardware manufacturers such as Fitbit, MakerBot and LittleBits, KPCB has been investing across a diverse range of IoT niches including auto, home automation, as well as wearables.

By Brent Anderson

4 Industries Being Transformed By The Internet of Things

4 Industries Being Transformed By The Internet of Things

Compelling IoT Industries

Every year, more and more media organizations race to predict the trends that will come to shape the online landscape over the next twelve months. Many of these are wild and outlandish and should be consumed with a pinch of salt, yet others stand out for their sober and well-researched judgements.

Online business publication Business Insider has a solid track record in the game of predictions, and there are some extremely interesting predictions with regard to the Internet of Things (IoT) and the ways that it is shaking up global business.

Connected Cars

Connected carsComic-Driverless-Cars are set to become ever more popular in the coming months. A recent surver revealed that two-thirds of new cars shipped in the US will be connected to the internet. That’s strong growth and it happens for many reasons.

On the supplier side, the auto industry benefits from the big data generated by thousands of connected cars in the real world, while consumers are in thrall to the media, data and applications which are geared specifically to people on the move. During 2016, it’s predicted that automakers will start to push updates and fixes to cars through the internet, which will be a massive change and signal the beginning of the end for mass recalls to deal with a problem.


The surge in the Internet of Things implies more devices are connected to the internet, and this brings with it greater security threats than ever before. Devices can be hacked, controlled remotely and data can be stolen. “As a result, as IoT devices become more common, and as companies become more wary of their vulnerability to data being stolen by hackers, we expect a huge surge in demand for insurance policies that protect against cyber hacks,” claims the report.


On the subject of insurance, the Business Insider Intelligence Report predicts that insurers will rely more and more on IoT to minimize their risk and inform their decision making.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

In 2015, insurers used IoT to track the driving habits of those they insured, and were extremely pleased with the results. You can expect the same sort of data-driven research from insurers when it comes to homes, offices, and even personal health data through devices such as FitBit and Apple Health.

Big data and the internet of things are going to have a profound impact on the insurance industry, and all the signs are that this change is already underway.

Oil Efficiency 

The collapse in the oil price during the last year has meant a major shakeup for oil producers around the globe. Producers don’t expect much of a recovery this year. As a result, maximizing efficiency has become a watchword for the industry. “We believe many of them will utilize IoT devices and analytics systems throughout the oil supply chain (upstream, midstream, and downstream) to improve their profits.”

By Jeremy Daniel

Optimizing Digital Marketing Through Accessibility & Aesthetics

Optimizing Digital Marketing Through Accessibility & Aesthetics

Optimizing Digital Marketing In The Cloud

Marketers are constantly looking for better ways to tantalize and engage customers, and there’s no space more competitive than the digital universe. Deliberating over pleasing layouts, effective calls to action, site responsiveness, and much more, digital marketers have more than enough to keep themselves busy without understanding the intricacies of website design and optimization. The corporate giants have access to department upon department of developers and designers, digital strategists, research teams, and publicity divisions backing up marketers, but the rest of the business world, made up of small and medium-sized enterprises, have no such luxuries. Luckily, a few shrewd service providers are ensuring their clients, no matter their size, have all of the necessary tools to compete successfully in the cloud.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Ease of Use

According to Econulstancy, 40% of people will abandon a web page if it takes more than three seconds to load, and so with trillions of dollars of retail sales ‘web-influenced’, ensuring your site is both accessible and optimized is a fundamental business requirement. Says Tim Schulz, chief product officer at Bigcommerce, “The key to success in today’s hyper-competitive retail market is to sell not only a product, but an entire experience to the shopper.” Organizations can no longer rely merely on providing a good product or service but instead must afford their customers an experience that is enjoyable, user-friendly, and ultimately superior to their rivals.

Aesthetically Pleasing

ben-mooreLooks do matter, and people are constantly judging books by their covers. Prudent companies spend no time concerned with this injustice, but rather take advantage of it. With many consumers basing decisions on where to spend their money purely on which website they believe the most attractive, businesses must constantly revamp and revise their site design, always preserving a fresh façade that discreetly expresses the company brand while charming the customer. “There is nothing more important than connecting your brand with shoppers,” states Ben Moore, CEO at Pixel Union.

Tools for Streamlined Experiences and Enjoyable Designs

A leading ecommerce platform, Bigcommerce, is magnifying their clients’ success with new attractive and responsive themes optimized for various catalog sizes, merchandise categories, and promotions. Collaborating with Pixel Union, these new themes promise a seamless shopping experience across all devices, and will continue to evolve to include advanced features traditionally only available through fully-customized storefronts. Says Schulz, “With our new themes, and the new development framework that powers them, our merchants will make an incredible first impression on today’s sophisticated online shoppers and ultimately sell more than they would on any other ecommerce platform in the world.

Through their new themes, Bigcommerce is providing clients with progressive features, including:

  • Optimized designs for mobile shoppers;
  • Seamless and simple customizations;
  • Built-in faceted search functionality;
  • Optimized one-page checkout.

Bigcommerce is putting a major focus on the end-to-end customer journey with these new themes, and that’s going to help merchants communicate their brand better and do more with their storefront to drive sales and build lasting relationships with their customers,” says Schulz.


In addition to a range of premium themes now available on the Theme Marketplace, several styles of free themes are also accessible.

Article sponsored by Bigcommerce

By Jennifer Klostermann

Pinup: CloudRAIL – Laying Down The IoT Tracks With API’s

Pinup: CloudRAIL – Laying Down The IoT Tracks With API’s

The Internet of Things and API’s

If you have been paying attention to the technology press in 2016, it’s likely that you will view the impending arrival of the Internet of Things (IoT) as an inevitability. The IoT, coupled with the rapid global adoption of robust cloud-based technologies, has seen whole industries being developed for a time when homes, workplaces and modes of transport are all connected and sharing information to make our lives easier. Pundits estimate that this new industry will generate billions of dollars, create thousands of jobs and transform our lives.


While it is certainly true that more and more devices are able to connect to the internet, it remains to be seen whether they can all be connected to each other in such a way that they complement each other and deliver on the promise of the internet of things. The problems of interoperability are a major stumbling block and are the driving force behind CloudRail, a company which was started in 2013 in Mannheim, Germany that seeks to bundle multiple API’s into one single SDK to integrate cloud services and devices in one fast and simple setup.

felix_kollmarFounding partner of CloudRail, Felix Kollmar noticed that developers were spending an inordinate amount of time working on integration for various services, rather than focusing on their core product offerings. “CloudRail has been working closely with our developer community to understand their needs and requirements,” he explained. “Multiple standards, data structures and interfaces from numerous vendors prevent true interoperability. The idea of the Internet of Things is that devices, software and cloud services communicate effectively, efficiently and securely across multiple ecosystems, but as of now this is just a dream.”

There are multiple benefits of having a single API to drive interconnectivity. Chief amongst the benefits is the convenience and the speed of development. Customer reach can be expanded exponentially with easy integrations to more services, developer maintenance costs are eliminated as the API updates automatically, and because it is a peer-to-peer connection, the need for middleware conversion is eliminated.

Poor documentation is another major stumbling block when one is dealing with multiple API’s. It can be enormously frustrating spending time trying to decipher the instructions and understand the internal logic of different API’s developed by different people. One universal API, one SDK to integrate and one manual to read eliminates all of those problems. There’s a growing set of ready to use cloud services and smart devices for integration and, if there is something missing, then its API can be added in minutes. And because the whole data transition is happening within the SDK, with no date being passed through a CloudRail server, there is no change of security breaches or the threat of server down time.

The number of devices and appliances coming online will expand exponentially over the next years and software developers will need to connect and integrate them to drive value for users,” says Marc Langner, Investment Manager at Leonardo Venture, one of the early seed investors in CloudRail. “CloudRail has the chance to become the leader in this Interoperability space.

If the Internet of Things is going to work as seamlessly in the years to come as it is envisaged, then it’s companies like CloudRail who can take the credit for laying that foundation.

By Jeremy Daniel

Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Out-of-the-box Cloud Solutions

Although people may argue that data is not safe in the Cloud because using cloud infrastructure requires trusting another party to look after mission critical data, cloud services actually are more secure than legacy systems. In fact, a recent study on the state of cloud security in the enterprise market revealed that 64 percent of medium and large businesses believe cloud infrastructure is more secure than legacy systems.

What factors contribute to positive and negative impressions of cloud security? What should businesses do to protect their data better?

Fear of the Cloud Arises From Media and Lack of Knowledge


You cannot blame people for being worried about cloud security. Everyone remembers the Target and Home Depot breaches, which compromised tens of millions of customer credit card information, as well as the Apple iCloud hack that leaked private celebrity photos to the public. These incidents caused many major news outlets to question cloud security. However, the media forgot to mention that these three high-profile attacks did not have much to do with cloud computing.

Target allowed a third-party to access its network, and then hackers got ahold of that third party’s log in credentials. Home Depot was attacked in much the same way, with hackers stealing a vendor’s login, accessing the network, and then using custom malware to get around the company’s antivirus software.

Even large businesses have mixed feelings about security in the cloud, naming it both the number one benefit and most frequently encountered challenge.

Many recent data breaches have been reported incorrectly. … In most cases, it is human error, and the Cloud cannot protect you from that.” – Jason Reichl, CEO, Go Nimbly

Impressions of Cloud Security Remain Resilient

Despite these events, this year, 90 percent of enterprises plan to increase or maintain their annual spending on cloud computing. If cloud infrastructure were such a risk, businesses would not be investing in the platform at such high rates.

david-linthicumDavid Linthicum, Senior Vice President of Cloud Technology Partners, says to think about cloud security systems like this: is your money safer stuffed in a mattress at home where you have control of it or with your local bank? A bank, obviously, is better positioned to protect your money because they have a vault and security cameras and are insured. Likewise, a cloud service provider (CSP) is better positioned to protect your data because they invest in 24-7 monitoring, the best cyber security tools, and physical barriers, such as video surveillance and biometric scanning.

Unfortunately, cloud infrastructure security on its own, out-of-the-box, is not enough to safeguard your business’ crucial data.

Steps to Ensure Data Security in the Cloud

What steps should businesses take to ensure data security, when using cloud infrastructure?

Migrating to the cloud starts with selecting a CSP that fits your business’ needs. It is important to recognize that not all CSPs are equal.

In 2013, former Editor in Chief of Yahoo Tech Dan Tynan detailed his experience with Box. In particular, he talked about how all his Box files once disappeared for six months. Specifically, his login didn’t work and the company could not locate the account associated with his email. This means Tynan’s data was missing for half a year, which raises concerns about stolen information. Who had access to his data?

National Security Agency (NSA) whistleblower Edward Snowden also warned against relying on the security features of another popular cloud service, Dropbox.


Dropbox? Get rid of Dropbox. It doesn’t support encryption. It doesn’t protect your private files. Use competitors, like SpiderOak, that do the same exact service, but they protect the content of what you’re sharing,” Snowden said in a 2014 interview with the New Yorker.

Indeed, it is true: some CSPs are more secure than others. For example, the difference between Dropbox and SpiderOak is that Dropbox, as well as many other major CSPs, encrypts data on its own servers but does not encrypt data locally, leaving it vulnerable to attacks. Conversely, SpiderOak encrypts data on both your local servers and their personal servers, reducing the opportunity for a security breach.

Regardless of the CSP your business uses, additional local security measures, such as data encryption, improved identity access policies, and regular audits, will minimize the possibility of a costly cyber attack.

By Sarah Patrick

IoT Innovations Expand To New Industries

IoT Innovations Expand To New Industries

IoT Innovations

The Internet of Things has moved far beyond a commonly tossed around buzzword. Instead IoT has solidified its place globally as a ‘must have’ for today’s most innovative companies. Organizations across a wide variety of industries are opening their businesses to new opportunities provided by IoT as a means to help embrace new opportunities presented by this explosive market. And explosive it is — according to IDC, the worldwide IoT market will continue to grow to $1.7 trillion by 2020. With such an enormous projection, Internet of Things is poised for rapid expansion in industries including (but not limited to) healthcare, consumer products manufacturing and retail. Yet not all industries appear to be on the same page when it comes to implementation. SAP shares a look into how quickly industries are adopting IoT and offers a peek into the promising future full of connected things.

Infographic_Industries Adopting IoT_Final social_001

(Image Source: SAP)

The Evolution Of The Connected Cloud

The Evolution Of The Connected Cloud

The Connected Cloud

Cloud computing is interesting first, but not only, because of the prevalence of cloud projects. There are many of them launched every day. Some have lofty expectations for business benefits (cost saving of 20 percent or more) and others carry even more intriguing goals.

In 2005 “the cloud” was new. Shared computing services were a novel idea. People weren’t sure they would catch on. There were many concerns about the initial reality of cloud, but the big one was security. Many business owners felt that cloud computing wouldn’t be as secure as their on-site system was.  Yet, from a purely tactical perspective, that wasn’t always the case. In fact, knowing where something is makes it more vulnerable than something with an unknown location.

The Community Cloud

The cloud ended up catching on, and eventually became an accepted reality. What may be coming, however, changes the cloud forever. There are US Government Agencies that have put two to four—or even more—petabytes of information into dedicated cloud solutions. “Dedicated cloud,” in this case means the community cloud as defined by NIST. In this case, there are multiple organizations using the resources, but they are all from the same group or agency. This makes having their data shared in a cloud less risky. There are also agencies that have data that gets leveraged around the world—for instance, the National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration (NOAA) and the United States Geological Survey Agency (USGS). Data these organizations generate is concrete: we know when there is an earthquake (you feel the earth move under your feet) and we all know what the weather is outside. Of course, these agencies do produce and generate more data than that, all of which is shared with various groups around the world.


Soon, however, there is a change coming to cloud computing. The concept of cloud service providers is going to change, with the advent and inclusion of data from Cyber Physical Systems (CPS), sometimes called the Internet of Things (IoT). Today, IoT devices produce more data that virtually every other producing system. Most of the data they produce isn’t used or even noticed. For example a remote thermite monitoring a specific location (say a volcano) publishes the temperature 4 times a minute or more than 5760 times in a day. We can discard the majority of those data points because they are not significant. If it is 82 degrees 10 miles from the volcano and 81 degrees on the volcano, that data is not useful or unique. Estimates place the volume of CPS/IoT generated data at around 110 zB today. Experts project that in less than 5 years there will be roughly 5 times as many CPS/IoT devices deployed.

As we get smarter, though, the sensors we deploy will produce more intelligent data. For example, that volcano thermometer may stop sending 5700 pieces of information and only send information when there is a significant change. The group that placed that sensor will be able to determine what “significant” means. For instance, with a volcano, you don’t care if it is suddenly 20 degrees colder at night. You do care if the temperature rises above the air temperature, even if that rise isn’t sudden. The concept of CPS/IoT device intelligence will reduce a lot of the overall data produced. That 5700 messages a day/35000 messages in a week may drop to 1.

The Cloud Future


(Infographic Image Source: Intel)

The future of cloud is in the transportation, manufacturing, analysis and consumption of CPS/IoT produced information.

Yes, cloud will continue to provide computing services and storage, as more and more of its overall capacity will be consumed by CPS/IoT data. The rise of intelligent sensors will keep the amount of data flow at a lower level than the increase in the number of CPS/IoT devices would suggest. But even intelligent sensors will have to check-in from time to time, sometimes simply to validate that the connection is still viable and working. The more critical the sensor the more frequently it will need to check-in. This won’t result in 35000 data points a week, but it will still produce some.

The Next Big Thing


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

The next big thing in cloud computing will be the hosting of billions of little things—or, actually, the data from billions of little things. Analyzing and compiling all that information will also change how the cloud is consumed by companies, governments, and individuals. There will need to be a throttle that pays attention to the data you are requesting, and a pipeline for getting you that data. Intelligent sensors will produce smart controlled data. Intelligent cloud solutions will allow the device connecting to receive the amount of data it can process effectively, so as not to drown the messenger in data.

The new cloud will be just like the old cloud, just doing new things a little differently.

By Scott Andersen

CloudTweaks Comics
Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Security, Security, Security!! Get use to it as we’ll be hearing more and more of this in the coming years. Collaborative security efforts from around the world must start as sometimes it feels there is a sense of Fait Accompli, that it’s simply too late to feel safe in this digital age. We may not…

Security and the Potential of 2 Billion Device Failures

Security and the Potential of 2 Billion Device Failures

IoT Device Failures I have, over the past three years, posted a number of Internet of Things (and the broader NIST-defined Cyber Physical Systems) conversations and topics. I have talked about drones, wearables and many other aspects of the Internet of Things. One of the integration problems has been the number of protocols the various…

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

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Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

DDoS Knocks Out Several Websites Cyber attacks targeting the internet infrastructure provider Dyn disrupted service on major sites such as Twitter and Spotify on Friday, mainly affecting users on the U.S. East Coast. It was not immediately clear who was responsible. Officials told Reuters that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Bureau…

The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise of BI Data Every few years, a new concept or technological development is introduced that drastically improves the business world as a whole. In 1983, the first commercially handheld mobile phone debuted and provided workers with an unprecedented amount of availability, leading to more productivity and profits. More recently, the Cloud has taken…

Security: Avoiding A Hatton Garden-Style Data Center Heist

Security: Avoiding A Hatton Garden-Style Data Center Heist

Data Center Protection In April 2015, one of the world’s biggest jewelry heists occurred at the Hatton Garden Safe Deposit Company in London. Posing as workmen, the criminals entered the building through a lift shaft and cut through a 50cm-thick concrete wall with an industrial power drill. Once inside, the criminals had free and unlimited…

Having Your Cybersecurity And Eating It Too

Having Your Cybersecurity And Eating It Too

The Catch 22 The very same year Marc Andreessen famously said that software was eating the world, the Chief Information Officer of the United States was announcing a major Cloud First goal. That was 2011. Five years later, as both the private and public sectors continue to adopt cloud-based software services, we’re interested in this…

Connecting With Customers In The Cloud

Connecting With Customers In The Cloud

Customers in the Cloud Global enterprises in every industry are increasingly turning to cloud-based innovators like Salesforce, ServiceNow, WorkDay and Aria, to handle critical systems like billing, IT services, HCM and CRM. One need look no further than Salesforce’s and Amazon’s most recent earnings report, to see this indeed is not a passing fad, but…

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority Research has revealed that third parties cause 63 percent of all data breaches. From HVAC contractors, to IT consultants, to supply chain analysts and beyond, the threats posed by third parties are real and growing. Deloitte, in its Global Survey 2016 of third party risk, reported…

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Once upon a time, only a select few companies like Google and Salesforce possessed the knowledge and expertise to operate efficient cloud infrastructure and applications. Organizations patronizing those companies benefitted with apps that offered new benefits in flexibility, scalability and cost effectiveness. These days, the sharp division between cloud and on-premises infrastructure…

3 Keys To Keeping Your Online Data Accessible

3 Keys To Keeping Your Online Data Accessible

Online Data Data storage is often a real headache for businesses. Additionally, the shift to the cloud in response to storage challenges has caused security teams to struggle to reorient, leaving 49 percent of organizations doubting their experts’ ability to adapt. Even so, decision makers should not put off moving from old legacy systems to…

Three Reasons Cloud Adoption Can Close The Federal Government’s Tech Gap

Three Reasons Cloud Adoption Can Close The Federal Government’s Tech Gap

Federal Government Cloud Adoption No one has ever accused the U.S. government of being technologically savvy. Aging software, systems and processes, internal politics, restricted budgets and a cultural resistance to change have set the federal sector years behind its private sector counterparts. Data and information security concerns have also been a major contributing factor inhibiting the…


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