Category Archives: Technology

The Dark Side of AI Part 3 – The Brighter Side

The Dark Side of AI Part 3 – The Brighter Side

The Dark Side of AI Part 3

For the final part in this series I wanted to get away from the doom and gloom of A.I. being the end of the world. Ultimately it is this sort of fear that could lead to secrecy and a dangerous lack of transparency emerging amongst potentially condemned scientists. So to counter the problems and dangers associated with AI, I wanted to explore the most abstract and intelligent applications of Artificial Intelligence that is already having an impact on our lives.

A.I. Lawyer

Ross, the first A.I. lawyer, has been designed and built atop IBM’s cognitive computer Watson to handle the Baker & Hostetler bankruptcy practice (which is currently made up of a team of 50 lawyers). It has been built to read and understand language, suggest hypotheses when asked a question, and research case law and precedent to back up its conclusions. Ross also incorporates deep learning, allowing it gain speed and knowledge the more you interact with it.

Rather than relying on researchers and experts to find obscure precedents and case law, Ross can read through the entire history to help you get the most accurate information quicker and more efficiently. Ross can even monitor ongoing cases and new court decisions that may affect the verdict of your case! As if we didn’t already have enough lawyers…

A.I. Personal DJ

SoundHound is a music and artificial intelligence company that is attempting to merge the two into a brand new speaker – the Hurricane Speaker. The speaker combines a voice controlled personal DJ/assistant, music recognition software (that allows you to sing a tune to it for recognition), and a vast music collection from which to draw from.

The speaker will be capable of selecting music based on a your mood, creating personalised playlists with its Predictive Analysis Library (PAL) algorithm, as well as providing updates on weather, sports, setting alarms, and generally helping to organise your life.

A.I. Doctor

ResApp Health is an Australian “digital healthcare solutions” company, who have been working on an app that can diagnose respiratory conditions using the microphone on a smartphone (acting like a stethoscope). The app applies deep learning algorithms to analyse cough sounds in an attempt to identify conditions such as pneumonia, asthma, bronchiolitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

But this is not an isolated use of machine learning in medicine. Enlitic is using Google’s deep learning open source tech to build an A.I. capable of diagnosing and suggesting treatment in order to help doctors solve medical issue much like a complex data problem. As a test they ran their algorithm with lung CT scans in an attempt to diagnose potentially cancerous growths, comparing it to results given by a panel of world’s top radiologists. Enlitic beat this panel comprehensively, successfully diagnosing every case of cancer when the panel missed 7%, whilst misdiagnosing 19% less cases than the human experts. Survival rates for cancer grow exponentially the earlier it is detected! For bonus points enclitic also helps doctors by showing them similar cases and helping to analyse trends that would be impossible for one doctor to see or consider.

A.I. Journalists Aid

With the associated press already using automation to cover minor league baseball games, it was only a matter of time before A.I. grew into a larger part of journalism. The next step in that growth comes via JUICE, a project funded by Google’s Digital News Initiative, and has been described as a tool to help journalists “discover and explore new creative angles on stories they write”. JUICE is being designed as an add-on to Google Docs, it uses AI systems to analyse what you have written and find creative and productive angles from which to approach the article or story. It is connected to around 470 news sites and automatically runs what they call “creative searches” to pull up relevant articles, cartoons, and multimedia that could be useful to the story. The project is aimed at improving the quality of journalism and helping writers find new ways of approaching their work. The system has had successful trials on journalism students and is expected to be more widely available at some point next year!

Although artificial intelligence can seem like an incredibly scary prospect, it is definitely a tool that has been and can continue to be used to improve many people’s lives and generally be a fantastic aid to the progression of society. However, there is a great deal of caution required in the pursuit of this technology. We cannot allow complacency of the same magnitude that we have allowed in nuclear power, climate change, and cyber security.

By Josh Hamilton

The Cloud Isn’t a Security Issue; It’s a Security Opportunity

The Cloud Isn’t a Security Issue; It’s a Security Opportunity

Security Issue

In order to stay ahead in today’s competitive business landscape, companies need to constantly innovate. Development teams must continually release new products, features or services and cloud technology, along with agile development practices, make this perpetual iterating feasible.

Cloud technology has undoubtedly enabled companies to innovate quickly and frequently, however, historically it’s introduced a myriad of security concerns, often causing development, operations and security teams to become overwhelmed and distracted. Today, though, security doesn’t have to hold back high-velocity, cloud-based product development cycles. Companies can achieve complete cloud security and compliance without a security issue impacting delivery speed, as long as they use the right tools and best practices across their organization.

Security Issue

Below are three key tips companies should consider in order to overcome any lingering security concerns and scale quickly and securely in the cloud:

1. Educate your team

For companies moving to a cloud-based infrastructure for the first time, it’s essential to discuss the change and make sure everyone understands how they will be affected before any data is migrated over. A key part of this discussion should be explaining that security is no longer just about perimeter defense and prevention; understanding the behavior of your workloads, users and environment is critical knowledge that needs to be shared. It’s important that everyone on the development, operations and security teams understand what all of their assets are doing and what’s taking place within the cloud workload at all times, as this is the best way to detect real cloud security threats as soon as they take place.

2. Track the ephemeral

Back in the days of ‘racking and stacking,’ it was easy to know what servers you had and where they were. But with cloud-based infrastructures, one of the key value propositions is elasticity: you might spin up an EC2 instance or cluster, for instance, do some data analysis for an hour or two, and then turn it off. There are advantages to such elasticity; however, it’s crucial to also have the ability to go back in time and view activity to ensure compliance and potentially investigate any risks. Additionally, as you’re building up and burning down, you want to know that those transient systems and workloads were compliant with your security posture. All too often companies focus on catching cloud security incidents only when they’re happening. But to remain consistently secure and compliant, security teams need to be able to ‘rewind’ and look at instances that may no longer exist.

3. Embrace software-defined everything

The beauty of the software-defined nature of the cloud is that it can actually make security teams’ jobs easier; they’re able to inject themselves throughout the infrastructure landscape and lifecycle. They no longer need to figure out how to capture information from switches, routers, and other devices at various layers of the network and try to correlate the data, because it’s all tied together. Additionally, integrations with tools like PagerDuty and Slack enable internal dialogues that empower non-security team members to collaborate on detection and response to potential issues. And when it’s time for security teams to intervene and investigate, deep audit trails make it possible to track not just whether a user logged in, but what processes they kicked off (and whether it was really them).

Some companies think cloud technology introduces a new layer of vulnerability, however in reality, it’s just the opposite. The cloud presents companies with an opportunity to evaluate their security requirements and reconsider their strategy and processes. It can enable security teams to focus on more strategic initiatives and also improve collaboration with Operations and Engineering teams. This, in turn, allows development, operations and security teams to spend more time on projects that drive real business value and less time frantically checking for potential security gaps.

Don’t let a past security issue prevent your company from migrating to the cloud and reaping its benefits. Discuss the change in detail and address any concerns with everyone in your organization well in advance. Track historical instances in order to ensure security and compliance, and consider implementing a cloud security solution to help gain deep insight into your environment in real-time, because software-defined everything is only possible with complete visibility (and vice versa).

By Chris Gervais

Progressions and Predictions of Marketing Technology

Progressions and Predictions of Marketing Technology

Predictions of Marketing Technology

In Gartner’s 2015 Data-Driven Marketing Survey we saw three new technologies entering the hype cycle, Predictive B2B Marketing, Ad Blocking, and Mobile Wallet. Further, the 2016 Hype Cycle for Digital Marketing and Advertising suggested that the combination of four key data-centric marketing driving forces including personalization, real-time marketing systems, the employment of contextual clues, and the convergence of Martech and Adtech would lead to more appropriate uses of IoT devices and analytics, and machine learning and personalization bolstering data-centric marketing tactics. As Gartner’s 2016-2017 Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) Spend Survey predicts higher marketing budgets in 2017, one wonders what marketing technology holds for us in the year to come.

Early Adopters

ws_martech_leverage-stackIn the second annual State of Marketing Technology report from Walker Sands, it’s suggested that marketers are becoming more comfortable with the ever increasing variety of tools at their disposal, many adopting martech devices more quickly. Unfortunately, more than half of today’s marketers aren’t managing to keep up with these changes. Though many marketers are seen jumping in with both feet, taking advantage of what one expert summed a landscape of nearly 4,000 solutions, just as many others are entirely overwhelmed by the new technology and requirements of the evolving digital marketing space. Surprisingly, this tremendous array of tools has not led the majority of companies to seek a single vendor for their marketing cloud, a solution which might offer greater ease of use and comfort. Instead, the majority of organizations both large and small are focusing on the integration of best-of-breed architecture to provide the best solution for each requirement, no matter the mix required.

Integration and Best-of-Breed

Along with the data suggesting best-of-breed architecture leads in martech selections, Walker Sands’ study finds that integrated best-of-breed marketing technology is the most popular and the majority of respondents believe their companies are well able to leverage the power of integrated best-of-breed tools. But fragmented best-of-breed stacks shouldn’t be disqualified just yet; currently, 21% of participants indicated use – just 6% less than those using integrated best-of-breed stacks. In fact, integration didn’t rank particularly high when respondents were asked what would better help them leverage the full power of their current marketing technology stack; instead 39% of respondents submitted that better strategy was key to this improved leveraging, and improved analytics and more training also ranked high on the list of ‘keys to fully leveraging martech stack.’

Virtual & Augmented Reality

Both virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) have recently been moving toward the mainstream with a range of industries developing methods to incorporate the once ‘science fiction’ tech. The advertising and marketing industries are no different. According to the IDC’s annual tech projections, “in 2017, 30% of consumer-facing Global 2000 companies will experiment with AR/VR as part of their marketing efforts.” As marketers recognize the value of interfaces for direct customer engagement, this evolution is occurring faster than expected and the IDC expects virtual and augmented reality adoption to reach mass levels by 2021. In just five years it’s projected that over a billion people globally will regularly use a virtual or augmented reality platform to access data, content, and apps.

It appears that, despite martech concerns such as ad-blocking tools and the effectiveness of some of the digital marketing and advertising tools, the role of digital marketing advertising moves from strength to strength and the plans for spend in this area remain high. A shift of offline media spending to digital channels is also being noted, suggesting that in years to come some of the better digital marketing tools we’re just coming to grips with today will hold an important position in the martech stack. 2017 will probably only see the foundations of a few of these innovations.

By Jennifer Klostermann

The Continued Growth of the SaaS Travel Industry

The Continued Growth of the SaaS Travel Industry

SaaS Travel Industry

The online travel industry can trace its roots to American Airlines in the late 1970s. It has grown from the SABRE (Semi-automated Business Research Environment) system, which was developed to automate booking reservations to, to a sprawling industry worth billions of dollars.

Expedia, Yahoo Travel, Booking.com, Justfly, and Priceline, makeup just a few of the companies vying to establish themselves at the top of the digital travel industry.

In 1999, before the internet became truly globalised, the Travel Industry Association of America reported that 15.1 million people in the United States booked their travel arrangements online. Worldwide digital travel sales surpassed $533 billion in 2015, a 13.3% increase from 2014, and that number is set to grow again this year. It may shock you a little to discover that, 17 years later, despite the massive growth of the internet, more than half of all travel bookings are still made offline – either over the phone or through retail travel agents.

mobile-travel

However, the online travel industry is set to continue to grow rapidly over the next few years. It has been estimated that by 2020, the highest percentage of total sales made by online payments will be held by the travel industry (see fig. 1). This growth can be attributed to the growth of the travel industry in general, with developing countries like China and India housing an ever expanding middle class, the amount of disposable income that these countries as a whole can spend on travel is set to skyrocket over the next decade.

Of the many travel sites that have benefitted from the meteoric rise of the internet over the last decade, Justfly has been one of the more recent success stories. JustFly is the fastest growing online travel company in the US, whose exponential rise can be attributed, at least in part, to their drive to stay ahead of the curve in providing modern technological benefits with a human touch.

The fact that over half of bookings still occur offline, can give us an insight into the public desire to deal with people rather than booking sites, when it comes to travel arrangements. Sites like Justfly or Expedia, who combined the best of modern technology, along with a human component seem to be enjoying the most success. Although some airlines have attempted to lessen the impact of these middle-men, they are fighting a losing battle. Michelle Evans, the digital consumer manager at Euromonitor, commented recently that online travel agencies are leading the overall growth in online and mobile travel bookings, though there has been some growth in direct bookings for hotels and lodgings.

Co-founder of ComScore, a U.S. Internet analytics company, Gian Fulgoni did suggest that airlines have been doing more to hold onto revenue that hotels, since branded travel sites have more to lose from receiving bookings through OTA’s (Outside Travel Agencies).

In contrast to the earlier statistic, that over half of all bookings are still made offline, a 2015 report by CNBC, suggested that 7 out of 10 people using the internet in the US were visiting travel sites. So, how do we account for this gap in the statistics? People are using the internet to find and compare prices, and many of them will then go to more traditional methods of booking to finalise their arrangements. Why else would sites like Expedia and Justfly place such a high value on the need for a human element to travel booking? Justfly’s entire matra is built on combining a team of travel experts, with their “efficient and technologically bullet-proof platform”.

Add all this to the fact that TripAdvisor garnered substantially more internet traffic (14.5% share of the market) this year, than any other travel site, the stats suggest that we are becoming smarter consumers. We are learning to take all aspects of the travel industry, both digital and human, and combine them to help us to find the best prices for our travels. As Gian Fulgoni put it, “The Internet has put pricing power in the hands of the consumer“.

Sponsored by Justfly

By Josh Hamilton

Why An Inside-Out Approach to Cloud Security Is Your Safest Bet

Why An Inside-Out Approach to Cloud Security Is Your Safest Bet

Cloud Security

In September, McKinsey released what might be looked back upon as a seminal survey. It opened the report with a simple, powerful declaration: “The cloud debate is over.” The data told a story that the pace of IT workloads moving to cloud is now at a “material” level and the impact would ripple across the industry. The survey reaffirmed the view of CIO’s and IT executives that security and compliance continue to be the top concerns of cloud adoption.

Now that the cloud is just accepted as a safe and viable growth path, it’s important that decision makers think about budgeting for cloud security differently. They are no longer buying hardware appliances and enterprise software. They need agile SaaS tools that can can scale and adapt to their cloud-based infrastructures to grow confidently and allow them to move even faster.

The Current State of Cloud Security

The growth of cloud adoption brings with it a serious need for more disciplined security practices. Between the MICROS/Oracle breach, the SWIFT Network attacks and a rash of healthcare industry data breaches, it seems every week there’s another major story about vulnerable data getting into the wrong hands. In today’s cloud-based business landscape, it’s no longer a question of if your organization will be targeted; it’s when.

complience-cloud-risks

While major cybersecurity breaches continue to dominate the news, the reality is only 3% of companies experience catastrophic losses worth more than $1 million. Smaller, internal threats are far more common for most organizations, and they can still cost companies significant capital. In fact, the Ponemon Institute found that insider activity is the most expensive ongoing cybersecurity threat to date, costing companies an average of $144,542 annually.

To combat cybercrime and proactively protect your organization, a more evolved approach to cloud security is necessary. Many organizations implement an outside-in approach, working to protect their infrastructure perimeter and company assets from malicious intruders who may be trying to gain access. However, this approach doesn’t take into account the possibility of internal threats, or hackers who have already gained access. Organizations and cloud security professionals need to focus on thwarting the advanced threats within cloud environments themselves, all while maintaining total compliance, of course.

This inside-out approach to cloud security isn’t always easy, however, and it can be made more difficult by the fact that cloud security professionals capable of handling the cloud’s advanced threats and compliance issues are becoming increasingly rare. Case in point? Cybersecurity Ventures found that the cybersecurity workforce shortage is expected to reach 1.5 million by 2019. This is creating a need for better tools to help operations teams level-up on security, thus improving operational efficiency. The big benefit: empowering those closest to the infrastructure to make the rapid changes necessary to improve security and continuously manage their security state over time.

Inside-Out Cloud Security Monitoring Considerations

Monitoring needs to occur at the workload layer, because here, activity can be monitored across multiple areas deep within the environment to accurately identify and stop inappropriate internal behavior before it causes damage.

security watch

It’s equally important for organizations to consider their Operations team when evaluating cloud security monitoring services or tools. Given the increasing overlap between Operations and security, monitoring tools should be able to integrate security alerts directly into “DevOps” workflows so teams can respond quickly and with context about what occurred. In other words, security information needs to move to where your teams are working every day and you need to choose platforms that can integrate easily and surface alerts and context in situations that matter.

One example of an inside-out approach to cloud security monitoring includes vulnerability management, which is used for scanning three key areas particularly prone to attacks: web applications, operating systems and everyday packages. With access to production, for example, a misguided or malicious employee could easily install an unauthorized package in your base AMI, or worse yet, install a package directly on production environments. With vulnerability management implemented as an inside-out strategy, however, DevOps teams can verify the attack surface of every installed package before it goes live and wreaks havoc.

By continuously monitoring for suspicious or unauthorized behaviors, organizations can identify internal threats before they spiral out of control. Real-time cloud security monitoring can aid organizations in their efforts to combat cybercrime and thankfully, such technology doesn’t require designated, in-house security professionals. However, it’s important to ensure monitoring is conducted from within the cloud workload itself and that it provides immediate and actionable alerts so DevOps teams can rapidly plan and carry out effective remediation. Lastly, to effectively protect your organization’s data, systems, customers and brand reputation, it’s critical to implement monitoring technology that can analyze normal system behavior as well as anomalous trends, so that any new or suspicious activities can be swiftly identified and contained before a breach occurs.

By Chris Gervais

Lessons for Corporate Board Members from the Colin Powell E-mail Hack

Lessons for Corporate Board Members from the Colin Powell E-mail Hack

Corporate Board Member Security

It’s every company’s worst nightmare: waking up to find your confidential company information plastered across The Wall Street Journal. Salesforce was a victim of just that when Colin Powell, a corporate board member, had his emails hacked and posted on DCleaks. One email contained a confidential slide deck detailing acquisition targets being considered by Salesforce. Although this information likely wasn’t what the hackers were looking for when they gained access to Powell’s private emails, Salesforce became the latest victim of this type of cybercrime.

There were 14 potential targets on the list that included Adobe, LinkedIn, Pegasystems, Box and Hubspot. Although several of these companies, such as LinkedIn and NetSuite, were already acquired this year, many others are still available and potentially in play. Powell has accidentally leaked some of Salesforce’s growth and innovation strategy, which Salesforce’s competitors are now privy to. It’s conceivable that a competitor could use the leaked information for their own benefit and swoop in to make a deal.

Many companies have strict internal information-sharing policies, but board members often are not required to follow the same rules, even though they have access to extremely sensitive information such as earnings reports, C-suite level communications and M&A target lists. Using email or consumer-grade file sharing apps to share sensitive corporate files exposes companies to a wide range of risks, and the consequences can be dire. Public embarrassment and damaged reputation aside, board members have been named in shareholder lawsuits as a result of data breaches, and activist investors have successfully removed board members after a breach.

board-business

Board members should be taking proactive steps to better protect their sensitive information and improve online security. However, it is important to remember that the ultimate responsibility for securing the board data lies with the company. The following tips aren’t groundbreaking, but they work, and are too often overlooked and forgotten:

  • Create strong, unique passwords for any site you access. Don’t reuse passwords, especially for important applications like online banking or file storage.
  • Only use file sharing services with two-factor authentication. This means, for example, that, when you log in from a new computer and enter your password, you’ll have to enter a code before you can access the account. This will rule out consumer-grade apps with a potentially lower security threshold than enterprise-level apps.
  • Separate business and personal files. It’s never a good idea to share personal information and business data through the same file sharing service or account. Many employers have rules against storing business information in consumer-grade file sharing tools, which is why they blacklist these types of applications.
  • Monitor your accounts regularly to catch theft or suspicious activity early on and reduce potential damage. In this case, Powell was a victim of a spear-phishing attack, where hackers target individuals with personally relevant information. Always assume you could be at risk.
  • Remember that email has been proven, time and again, unsafe for sharing confidential information. If a document needs to be shared externally, ensure you are using a secure file sharing system, not email, so that if the document falls into the wrong hands nobody else can open the file.
  • Consider applying expiration dates to files to time-bound documents.
  • Be extremely prudent about where you store your data.

Corporate board members ignore cybersecurity best practices at their own peril. This goes double for board members with a high profile like Colin Powell, who can be targeted by ‘hacktivists’ for a variety of reasons unrelated to their board positions. Don’t let you or your company become the next casualty in our cyber-insecure world.

By Daren Glenister

Fintech Report: Financial Services Sector Growth

Fintech Report: Financial Services Sector Growth

Financial Services Sector

Fintech, a term typically describing the small financial start-ups competing with established financial institutions, is increasingly playing a role in our business and private lives, making use of analytics, mobile platforms, digital technology and more. With increased consumer expectations and heightened security concerns, interest in the fintech sector is at an all-time high.

Fintech vs. Traditional Banking

Though there’s much hype around financial technology firms, and they’re certainly shaking up the financial services sector as a whole, many experts don’t believe they pose an immediate risk to the systems already in place. Including services such as peer-to-peer lending, crowdfunding, and app-based payment tools, fintech developers are forcing financial services to evolve into a more customer-centric sphere than previously experienced, and many customers are more than happy to bypass the haughty attitudes of financial institutions of old and deal instead with innovative and vibrant fintech services.

The fintech sector is, however, still tiny and though perhaps encouraging traditional institutions to change more quickly than they might have otherwise, fintech alone won’t be dominating the financial services sector anytime soon. Of course, there are a few progressive financial institutions that aren’t waiting for the future competition but instead are merging their brands with fintech firms and helping them go mainstream. This combined effort provides a unique benefit to both old and new as the disrupting fintech firms foster better customer engagement and original products while the conventional financial powerhouses support the union with their resources and networks and provide responsible and trustworthy foundations.

Rules & Governance for Fintech Organizations

But just because fintech isn’t yet competing directly with many of the larger traditional financial institutions doesn’t mean it won’t in the future. For this reason, some countries are being cautious with their fintech regulations, concerned that they might repress a promising sector but equally aware of the necessity for proper controls and security. In the US federal regulators are considering a new regulatory framework for fintech organizations, while various states have already implemented their own guidelines. Since digital currencies and blockchain form a fundamental part of many fintech products and services, regulating the fintech industry as a whole becomes an intricate web.

With the recent hacking of Tesco Bank in the UK, however, it’s become apparent that regulations must be put in place, and quickly. After 20,000 customers had money fraudulently taken from their accounts, the UK’s largest grocer saw its stock dropping by 3.3%, but aside from the action required to repair the damage for this particular attack we’re left worrying which other fintech services that we rely on may be threatened. Top regulators for the financial industry are already promising stringent rules and governance measures for the fintech sector, and it’s likely, if not necessary, that the full spread of financial laws will be applied to fintech organizations before long.

Where to Next?

Financial Services Sector

(Infographic Source: Capgemini)

The future of the fintech industry isn’t yet clear, though most are confident that fintech will have a substantial role in years to come. As traditional financial services organizations explore strategic advances to ensure they remain competitive, fintech solutions continue to blaze the trail, sometimes providing inspiration, and yet other times serving as a cautionary tale. The World Fintech Report 2017 finds that already 50.2% of global banking customers are using fintech products or services, and in fact, many are using solutions from a range of fintech providers suggesting a threat to traditional banking loyalty. It’s unsurprising too that the technology is more popular with younger, affluent, tech-savvy users looking for value for money over a one stop shop. Further, it appears that emerging markets typically show the highest adoption rates, with China at 84.4% and India at 76.9%.

As the overall financial services sector undergoes a dramatic shift, the consumers often come up trumps as they’re provided with a range of services both old and new to suit differing risk appetites and product requirements. There is indeed much work still to be done by those in the industry and those who manage and govern it, but for a while yet we’ll see a burgeoning market.

By Jennifer Klostermann

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5% Of Companies Have Embraced The Digital Innovation Fostered By Cloud Computing

5% Of Companies Have Embraced The Digital Innovation Fostered By Cloud Computing

Embracing The Cloud We love the stories of big complacent industry leaders having their positions sledge hammered by nimble cloud-based competitors. Saleforce.com chews up Oracle’s CRM business. Airbnb has a bigger market cap than Marriott. Amazon crushes Walmart (and pretty much every other retailer). We say: “How could they have not seen this coming?” But, more…

Connecting With Customers In The Cloud

Connecting With Customers In The Cloud

Customers in the Cloud Global enterprises in every industry are increasingly turning to cloud-based innovators like Salesforce, ServiceNow, WorkDay and Aria, to handle critical systems like billing, IT services, HCM and CRM. One need look no further than Salesforce’s and Amazon’s most recent earnings report, to see this indeed is not a passing fad, but…

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Revenue Imperatives “Follow the money” is always a good piece of advice, but in today’s recurring revenue-driven market, “follow the customer” may be more powerful. Two recurring revenue imperatives highlight the importance of responding to, and cherishing customer interactions. Technology and competitive advantage influence the final two. If you’re part of the movement towards recurring…