Category Archives: Technology

Did The FBI Make A Mistake In Publicly Fighting Apple?

Did The FBI Make A Mistake In Publicly Fighting Apple?

Dropping The Gloves: The FBI vs Apple

Unless you live in a completely disconnected bubble, you’ve heard all about the recent battle between Apple and the FBI. You’ve heard the arguments from different sides —you’ve probably even debated on one side or the other. Some argued that Apple was right because nothing should come above privacy, while others maintained that some things outweigh the privacy expectations. Saying that the FBI wanted a backdoor is a stretch. Finally, there were some who believed the FBI was after setting a legal precedent than actually having Apple build a software.

The question that’s debated less frequently is whether the FBI made a mistake in fighting Apple publicly and then just as publicly announcing its triumph — that is, finding a hack without Apple’s help. It’s a question that goes deeper than simply personal privacy vs. national security.

Privacy and Encryption

To recap, the FBI needed to unlock the iPhone of one of the two shooters who left 14 people dead and 22 injured last December in San Bernardino. Because the phone was encrypted, after 10 failed passcode attempts, the data would self-erase. According to Apple, FBI’s request — which ended up in court — was to “make a new version of the iPhone operating system, circumventing several important security features, and install it on an iPhone recovered during the investigation.” The request for this backdoor, Apple argued, would create software — which doesn’t currently exist — that could fall into the wrong hands and allow anyone to physically unlock any iPhone.

Apple began encrypting iPhones when it introduced iOS 8 in 2014. In a nutshell, it works like this: The iPhone encrypts the data by scrambling it so it can’t be read without a 256-bit “key.” The key, a unique identifier for each specific device, is “burnt” into the silicon, can’t be bypassed and is not logged anywhere outside of the application processor.

Cybersecurity professionals have been advocating for encryption of data at rest as well as in transit as a way of protecting personally identifiable information, and not just on devices. With encryption, data stolen by cybercriminals in a breach would be useless since a key would be required to read it. The U.S. government, at the same time, has been growing concerned because encryption hinders the access of law enforcement agents just as much as it does for criminals. Even worse, from the point of view of agencies like the FBI, it gives criminals and terrorists a leg up because they can “go dark.’

Shadow-cloud

Although in the most-recent case the FBI said the iPhone would be a one-time hack, Apple and other privacy advocates argued this would set a precedent not only for the U.S. government but also for foreign ones, including those in oppressive countries like China.

The encryption discussion is not unique to the United States. China passed a law last year requiring tech companies to hand over encryption keys for government requests of information. The United Kingdom proposed a bill last year that would have required intercept capabilities for encrypted communications. On the other side of the spectrum, Germany has been promoting encryption, even offering all its citizens a free email service that encrypts messages.

Apple vs. the FBI

Apple’s refusal to comply with FBI’s request led the Justice Department to request a U.S. District Court order forcing the company to comply. In the weeks preceding a scheduled hearing, the matter played out in the court of public opinion. The dispute became increasingly public as Apple revealed how it had offered the agency other solutions for obtaining the phone’s data, while the FBI insisted it was not trying to set a precedent for other cases.

DataLock-cloudtweaks-comic

There was no shortage of reaction from the media, other major tech players, advocacy groups, lawmakers and former intelligence officials. There was also plenty of speculation — including on Apple’s part — as to whether the National Security Agency already had the capability to break into an iPhone, considering its advance surveillance capabilities.

And if NSA could do it, why wouldn’t the FBI request the assistance, Apple asked. But according to Reuters, not all federal agencies support FBI’s side. A Reuters report said that there was no consensus within the government itself, and that some NSA and Department of Homeland Officials took Apple’s side.

Despite FBI’s insistence that only Apple can offer a solution, the agency recently revealed it’s working with one of the many outside parties that had offered to help hack the phone, and the court hearing was postponed.

FBI’s Tactical Mistake

Despite the FBI’s insistence that it wasn’t asking for a precedent and the case was all about a specific phone, it’s clear that there’s much more going on. In fact, according to Apple, the agency has made similar requests on several other occasions. The San Bernardino case is only different because it’s much tougher to argue against fighting terrorism — but compliance with the request would, without a doubt, open the floodgates for future court orders.

The FBI, after all, has been trying to make its case against encryption for a while. FBI Director James Coney stopped short of telling Congress that a backdoor should be required of tech companies but did suggest a “front door” approach (which, like the proposed UK law, would mandate “intercept solutions”). And, as documents leaked by Edward Snowden revealed, the FBI deliberately influenced weaker cryptography standards recommended by the National Institute of Standards and Technology that are used both by the private and public sectors.

The security community has been divided in this fight, but it’s fare to say that the FBI overplayed its hand by trying to force Apple — especially publicly— to compromise its own products and to bet on its “fight against terrorism” card. The agency could have just as easily and quietly requested the assistance of other third parties without dragging Apple through the mud. Not to mention if it believes so strongly that this fight is justified, it should instead use the U.S. Congress to advocate for new laws.

And now that the whole world knows what only some may have suspected — that the iPhone is not the fortress Apple’s marketing makes it out to be — who really loses in the end?

Consumers may lose in the short run, considering that the method will likely be leaked by the vendor and the FBI would also have to share it with local law enforcement agencies. At the same time cyberattackers, including nation-state sponsored ones, will be very interested in getting their hands on the vulnerability that allowed the FBI to get in, and they’re very crafty when it comes to getting what they want.

Apple may not be in the losing corner for long, however, even it its PR takes a hit. It will, instead, emerge as a winner because it will be able to figure out the flaw and patch it. The FBI’s victory in the end will be short-lived since not only will Apple fix the backdoor but it will also look for new ways to make its devices even more secure. So in the long run, consumers win too, because all this fist-fighting will result in more secure software.

Hopefully one thing that sticks in everyone’s minds, when the dust settles, is why building a backdoor into any security product is not a good idea. Even with robust security that’s built into a product such as the one built by Microsoft, a backdoor would negate all the efforts to create better security in the first place.

The FBI is certainty not the first federal agency attempting to use a good story and make a case for giving up individual privacy in exchange for perceived security. But this is a reminder that the tradeoff will always be up for debate. One thing is clear though: in breaking into the iPhone that was touted as impenetrable, the FBI has sent a strong signal to tech companies and their reverence for encryption. So the lingering questions remains: was this battle, after all, about nothing but principles, from either side?

By Sekhar Sarukkai

Big Data Startups Buzz Makers

Big Data Startups Buzz Makers

Big Data Startups 

In November 2015, global market intelligence firm IDC predicted that Big Data tech and services markets would increase at a CAGR of 23.1% between 2014 and 2019. They further projected annual spending reaching $48.6 billion in 2019. Says IDC program director Ashish Nadkarni, “The ever-increasing appetite of businesses to embrace emerging big data-related software and infrastructure technologies while keeping the implementation costs low has led to the creation of a rich ecosystem of new and incumbent suppliers.” And Big Data isn’t just for the tech giants; as analytics becomes even more sophisticated and data collection more comprehensive, many startups are coming up with their own innovative products, services, and solutions. Across all industries, Big Data is a valuable commodity, and thanks in part to social media and the Internet of Things (IoT) organizations are learning not only how to collect and store it, but how to analyze it, gather insights from it, and put it to use in company-specific forms.

Big-Data-Santa-CloudTweaks

Exciting Big Data Startups

Algorithmia

Founded in December 2013, this startup is developing an online algorithms marketplace. Used by more than 16,000 developers, and with over 2,000 algorithms in their library, Algorithmia has been described as “... providing the smarts needed to do various tasks in the fields of machine learning, audio and visual processing, and even computer vision.”

Bedrock Data

A cloud-based data management and system integration platform, the principle behind Bedrock Data is ease of management and maintenance for non-developers. The platform helps businesses maximize their business systems with numerous integration combinations that can be managed in one place.

BlueTalon

The Ponemon Institute states, “71% of corporate employees report having access to information they shouldn’t.” For data-centric security for Hadoop, SQL, and Big Data, BlueTalon protects sensitive data through access control and dynamic masking capabilities on the Hadoop Distributed File System. It can be utilized on all distributions of Hadoop, as well as Microsoft Azure and AWS.

Confluent

With investors including Benchmark, Data Collective, LinkedIn, and Index Ventures, this startup was founded by the team that built Kafka at LinkedIn. Confluent is described as “Kafka made easy” and is an open source platform containing the necessary components to create scalable data platforms built around Apache Kafka. Supporting many of the features Apache Kafka already provides, the Confluent platform offers additional features such as C/C++ Client, REST Proxy, Kafka Connectors, Schema Registry, and Enterprise Support.

H2O.ai

AI for business,” this open source machine learning platform can be used in predictive modeling factories, advertising technology, risk and fraud analysis, healthcare, insurance analytics, and customer intelligence. Thanks to the speed and flexibility of H20, users are able to fit many hundreds of potential models in attempts to discover patterns in data and find usable information.

Wavefront

The Wavefront platform uses real-time analytics to help organizations predict and prevent downtime and deliver exceptional customer service. Users are able to manage their entire stack, with data available immediately and cohesively, and hundreds of concurrent users can be supported.

Satisfied customers include SpaceApe, Clover, Box, and Snowflake.

By Jennifer Klostermann

The Emerging Connected Data Cloud

The Emerging Connected Data Cloud

The Data Cloud

Because of the flexibility and scalability of cloud services, organizations can experiment with big data in an elastic and malleable environment. For data-focused businesses, this had led to a better use of big data sources and the information gleaned from social media, IoT devices, retail beacons, and the likes are put to use in analytics programs, including open source tools such as Apache Hadoop and Spark, to generate useful insights quickly. With the exponentially increasing stores of data, the cloud is an invaluable tool not only for the storage and security of raw data but for the study and progression of it.

Healthy Competition

As Microsoft expands its cloud big data analytics, with its Linux compatibility enticing new organizations to adopt cloud-based big data solutions, and support for open-source R language a significant attraction, Google edges further into big data and cloud analytics with its new Cloud Machine Learning suite of services. Amazon and IBM round up the four cloud computing giants, and we have IBM Watson working on big data and genomics in Italy, and Amazon Web Services attempting to dominate the IoT landscape with an improved suite of streaming data and analytics services. With such formidable competition, the cloud and big data industry is flourishing, and users are reaping the rewards.

Emerging Trends

emerging-trends

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Unsurprisingly, social media is a chief source of data for many businesses thanks to the instant feedback of products and services. And so, customers are being tracked to add the more personal data elements to the already massive quantities of data organizations have access to. One of the key outcomes of this trend is that businesses are better understanding their customers, as well as improving their communication to them.

Machine learning continues to grow as algorithms enabling computers to learn from experience are improved and refined. Predictive analytics is one sector well-positioned to benefit from this, and deep neural nets are likely to start making a stir thanks to algorithms that allow the modeling of complex nonlinear relationships, thus enabling machines to observe their environs. Emotion recognition software is another development to watch out for, suggesting a fresh range of data analytics applications along with the ‘warm’ data it’s likely to produce.

Self-driving cars are already emerging in our world, but this is only one aspect of today’s evolving automotive technology. Manufacturers are using data to improve driver and passenger experience, enhance safety, and increase efficiencies, and it’s not difficult to imagine a world where every vehicle is connected to a data center.

The synergy between cloud computing and big data allows organizations to efficiently and cost-effectively implement big data solutions with everyday information collected, stored, and analyzed through cloud services. The information is available anywhere and can be stored in locations throughout the globe, and as businesses recognize the potential, investment in big data and cloud computing escalates.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Infographic: How Wearables Are Revolutionizing Health Care Services

Infographic: How Wearables Are Revolutionizing Health Care Services

Wearable Technology for Healthcare

The consumer eHealth and health insurance industry is set to have a major focus on wearable technology with the benefits it can provide to both consumers and health care providers. 1 in 5 American’s now owns a wearable tech device. Consumer belief in wearable technology is also extremely high with 56% of consumers believing that the average life expectancy increases over 10 years due to wearables monitoring vital signs. The two most popular devices in the market currently are fitness bands and smart watches. Despite the growth of wearables, the use of wearable tech is still in its infancy with users weighing in on the benefits as well as the unmet expectations with wearable technology.

The Struggle with Overcoming Consumer Concerns

One big issue with wearable technology is consumer abandonment. Almost a third of all wearable device consumers reported using it less or not at all only a year after buying it. Another common issue consumers have with wearable technology is concerns of privacy and security breaches. 82% of consumers worry about an invasion of privacy and over 86% worry that wearables make consumers more vulnerable to security breaches. Despite these concerns, consumers are also seeing a lot of added benefits from wearable technology.

Added benefits from Wearable Technology

Wearable technology provides benefits to not only consumers, but also to health care providers and businesses. 46% of consumers believe wearable technology can help them to lose weight and as well increase life expectancy by being able to actively monitor vital signs on a regular basis. BP distributed 16,000 FitBits to its employees as part of a large health plan for employees. This dropped corporate healthcare costs well below the national growth rate.

WearableElectronics2

Humana uses wearables to reward fitness activities with reduced premiums, gift cards and health devices. A three-year study of employees using this HumanaVitality health plan showed a 44% decrease in sick days for employees. This is starting to become a trend in many workplaces as a healthier workforce results in lower health care costs for both the employee and the health care provider. It’s a win-win situation with everyone saving money.

The Future of Wearables

As it stands right now, wearable technology can increase consumer engagement, track physical activity, as well as collect health data. Current wearable programs are being fine-tuned to provide more benefits for consumers, employers, insurers and health care providers and other stakeholders. The wearables that will provide the most value in the future will:

  • Embrace opportunities in the Internet of Things
  • Transform big data into valuable information that provides insights
  • Simplify user experience with a more human-centered design
  • To learn more about how wearables are revolutionizing the health care industry, check out this useful and informative infographic from the Northwestern School of Professional Studies.

wearable-tech-and-insurance

Why Data Minimization Cannot Be Ignored

Why Data Minimization Cannot Be Ignored

Data Minimization

With big data coming in full form to help Internet of Things (IoT) devices, companies are collecting more and more user data to help them create better products. In fact, some companies never delete user data, even if they are probably never going to use it. If you work in a tech company, we are sure you have never, ever heard your boss say – “Delete it.” Nobody deletes anything in the IT industry. Documents are versioned, and every version of them is kept safely on the company’s servers. In fact, Amazon’s CEO, Jeff Bezos was quoted saying, “We never throw away data.”

But, that’s just one part of the story. As the data increases at an exponential rate, companies need to get more servers, hire more staff to handle those servers and at the same time they have to make sure that all the data on their servers is secure, and it follows the guidelines set out by the government. This obviously increases costs, and it doesn’t make sense to pay for data that you are never going to use.

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(Infographic Source: Datameer)

This is the reason organizations are finally realizing that when it comes to data, “less is more” approach can go a long way. Governments are also taking note of the fact that companies all over the world are collecting more user data than they actually need in the first place, and this violates user privacy.

The European Union has already introduced an amendment to the Data Protection Act and according to this amendment, “Personal data shall be adequate, relevant and not excessive in relation to the purpose or purposes for which they are processed.”

And this is the very core purpose of data minimization

What is data minimization

Basically, data minimization means only collecting a part of the data which is required by the organization and relevant to it as well. There was a time when collecting a large quantity of data suddenly became easy, organizations were bombarded with a large amount of data and they decided to save it all.

But as the IoT grows, organizations have several other ways to collect various kinds of data, and that also includes users’ private data. The main reason why organizations are continuously saving data even though they are not currently using it is because they think this data might come in use in the future. Though the fact is, it is technically data hoarding, and it is already causing organizations a lot of money.

Organizations need to practice data minimization

Google already announced last year that it will be taking user privacy seriously by offering more personalized features and storing less user data on its servers. Apple also followed the lead and announced that it would not be storing user data on the cloud on iOS 9 and the subsequent iOS versions. Instead, the private user data would only be stored on the local machine.

meta-data

As we mentioned, the major benefit of data minimization is lesser costs. After all, storing data costs a great deal. At the same time, storing less data also means the organizations are less prone to risks and breaches. If you are a rookie to regulations and compliances, then you should know that every company in a specific sector that stores user data online has to follow certain rules. And if they don’t, the government can file a case against them for breaching those regulations. For instance, companies in the health sector have to follow HIPAA and HITECH compliances.

But, what happens when an organization loses some of its data? Even though that data wasn’t useful for the company at all, they lose their reputation in the market, and they would also have to pay for data breach. According to a study conducted in 2009, the per-record cost of a data breach is $209. So basically, if a company loses 100,000 records of user data, then they would lose $20 million.

And with the new amendment in the European Union law, many European companies would now have to practice data minimization and make sure they are not collecting unnecessary user data.

In Summary

Organizations all over the world now need to think carefully before storing data. They have to analyze and decide if the data they are collecting is useful right now or it would be useful in the next five years, and they also have to decide if lesser sensitive data could be collected instead. Governments slowly realize the power of data and their laws will only get tougher from here.

By Ritika Tiwari

New Smartphones From Apple, Samsung and HTC Promise To Light Up 2016

New Smartphones From Apple, Samsung and HTC Promise To Light Up 2016

New Smartphones from Apple, Samsung and HTC

(Sponsored post courtesy of Verizon Wireless)

The launch of the Galaxy S7 Edge at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona during February was the first shot in a vintage year for mobile phones. The S7 is an incredible piece of hardware, but launches from HTC and Apple later in the year are likely to give Samsung sleepless nights in the battle to be crowned best phone on the market.

Get $100 off select smartphones! Enter code VZWDEAL to receive your discount. New device payment req’d. Excludes upgrades.

cloud_173But while the hardware makes battle for top spot, Verizon was able to clinch its fifth consecutive title as ‘best wireless provider’ from mobile network analysts RootMetrics, making it the obvious choice when deciding which carrier to partner your new mobile device with.

Today’s mobile devices are so sophisticated that, as consumers, we barely acknowledge that the devices we carry around with us all day long are such masterpieces of form and function that, to quote Arthur C. Clare, ‘they are barely distinguishable from magic’.

Let’s take a closer look at the latest crop of mobile phones and what they are offering:

Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge

It was not too long ago that pundits were predicting that the South Korean giants of technology had lost their edge, that they were all out of ideas and that their best years were behind them. What a difference a killer launch of a killer product makes! The new flagship mobile from Samsung, the Galaxy S7 Edge, has been universally praised as the standard bearer of what a mobile phone can achieve.

mobile-phone-smart

An incredible new 5.5-inch HD quad screen brings deep blacks and rich colours to life with the click of a button. The camera has also been improved considerably, and the 12.1MP camera is superb under low-lighting conditions. There’s so much more: from great waterproofing to improved audio, some amazing leaps forward in terms of virtual reality, as well as 4GB of RAM to run all the gaming that the company is betting heavily on for the future.

Right now, it’s safe to say that this is the phone to beat.

Get $100 back when you buy a Galaxy s7 or S7 Edge. New smartphone device payment activation req’d. Upgrades excluded. $100 bill credit applied in 1-2 billing cycles.

HTC 10

What was once an easy sell has become that much more difficult. HTC devices were consistently rated as world-class, but never quite managed the leap to into mass consciousness that Apple and Samsung got right. Their last great phone was the HTC ONE M8 in late 2014, but all indications are that the company is hoping for big things with the launch of the HTC 10 in April.

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Leaks are reaching the press about a Super LCD 5 Screen and a 3,000 mAh battery which would match the Galaxy S7’s power source. Add to that a 5.15-inch Quad HD Display, and a camera which the company is boasting is ‘world first, world class technology’ and you have a phone that could return HTC to the top of the table.

Watch the press closely for details. We’ve got a good feeling about this one.

iPhone S7

Of course, whenever conversation turns to the state of the mobile phone market, people inevitably begin to wonder what tricks Apple has up its sleeve. The rumor mill is never silent when it comes to the colossus from Cupertino, so what are people talking about right now?

Well, there’s every indication that the next iPhone will feature 4k video recording, which will make the video capabilities simply sublime. With the recent release of a critically-acclaimed feature film, Tangerine, that was shot entirely on an iPhone 6, it’s going to be harder and harder to justify buying a separate video camera when your phone is that good at capturing video.

There is also talk of full wireless charging by 2017 for all new iPhones, and of the new iPhone being stripped of its headphone jack. Macrumors reports that “Eliminating the headphone jack will give Apple more internal space for other components, and Apple will also keep the device slim with the continued use of in-cell panels and TFT-LCD display technology.” Headphones will be connected through the lightning port, or via Bluetooth going forward.

Wireless Carrier

wireless

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

No matter whether you go with Samsung, HTC or Apple, all the great hardware in the word can’t do you much good if you’re being held back by the quality of your wireless. The device and the service provider are two sides of the same coin. That’s why Verizon was so delighted to be named as the number 1 in overall network performance in the National RootScore Report for reliability, data and call performance, as well as network speed (for the fourth year in a row).

Free overnight shipping! Must be selected at checkout.

While companies like Apple, Samsung, Sony and many more continue to deliver jaw-dropping devices with incredible features, consumers should demand the same levels of service from the networks responsible for carrying the content and data.

By Jeremy Daniel

How the Internet of Things will change your life

How the Internet of Things will change your life

Internet of Things Day

This Saturday 9th April, it’s global Internet of Things day. A day where people around the world come together at events to talk about and debate the future and what the Internet of Things means for us all

What does the future hold for us? Well here are just a couple of areas that we can see changing in the coming years.

Medical / healthcare

There have already been some huge leaps forward in recent years in the field of medtech, this invention from Google making some of the bigger headlines last year. But there is much more possible, even just looking at today’s technology, we can see a number of things developing, such as:

  • Smart pill bottles – these bottles monitor your pill usage, not only making sure that you’re taking the right doses but also letting your Doctor know when you may need more.
  • Smart pills – not just the bottle, but the pills themselves can become smart, providing your Doctor with better insights into your health and the effect their treatments are having.

Transport

Like in the medical industry, we’re already seeing glimpses of what’s possible when it comes to the Internet of Things and transport. A few developments we could see include:

  • Self-driving and parking cars – Tesla are pushing this a lot at the moment but lots of companies see the potential here.
  • Parking apps – there are plenty of apps out there that are gathering data on local car park facilities and using this to tell drivers where a free spot is available. It’s not that unthinkable to connect this data directly to a car with self-parking ability and potentially for that car to find a space and park itself without any input from the driver.

It goes beyond cars too, cycles are getting the Internet of Things treatment too!

There is a huge amount of information out there and the team at RS Components have put together a simple visualisation showing what the Internet of Things is and importantly, what it could mean for our future. You can take a closer look at the visual below.

IOT_6.3-Infographic

By Heidi Walker

IBM & Pfizer Join Forces To Work On IoT Innovation

IBM & Pfizer Join Forces To Work On IoT Innovation

IBM & Pfizer Join Forces

For many years, the diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease induced a feeling of hopelessness and defeat amongst both sufferers of the disease and the medical professionals who care for them. Parkinson’s is a progressive degeneration of the nervous system which chiefly affects middle-aged and elderly people. Yet, in recent years, there has been renewed hope and confidence that quality of life, prevention and even the cure of Parkinson’s will one day be possible.

New strategies and ideas are being put forward right now which will dramatically improve our understanding of what it is like to live with the disease. Pharmaceutical company Pfizer is teaming up with technology powerhouse IBM in an effort to use the Internet of Things as a means of producing real-time, continuous data of a patient’s symptoms, and understanding how those symptoms impact on that person’s daily life.

healthcare

The idea behind the research project is to use a sophisticated system of mobile devices, sensors and connected machines in a controlled environment to track a patient’s particular set of symptoms and to monitor and evaluate whether their symptoms are worsening or improving. “The goal is that through these experiments the team can create a program that would allow that flow of data from the patient to their medical team and provide more pinpoint dosing,” explains technology website TechCrunch.

At this stage, the approach is very experimental. The clinical trials will begin in 2018 at IBM’s Research Centre where a functional apartment is being built with a network of hidden sensors that will monitor the daily experiences of the participants in minute detail.

Fortune magazine explains that “Pfizer and IBM will rotate in as many as 200 participants, both those with Parkinson’s disease and control subjects who don’t have the neurological condition, who will live in the space for a period of time and produce reams information from these sensors.”

The potential for both IBM and Pfizer is tremendous. IBM is investing heavily in the Internet of Things and in its ability to effectively analyze big data, while Pfizer is hoping to test and monitor its newest Parkinson’s drug which is in the pipeline. For both companies, a new approach to treating Parkinson’s would reap great rewards.

Mikael-DolstenAccording to Mikael Dolsten, president of Pfizer Worldwide R&D, “we have an opportunity to potentially redefine how we think about patient outcomes and 24/7 monitoring, by combining Pfizer’s scientific, medical and regulatory expertise with IBM’s ability to integrate and interpret complex data in innovative ways.

Industries all around the world are rapidly gaining an understanding of the impact that the Internet of Things could potentially have on the way that they conduct their business and the pharmaceutical industry is no exception.

A partnership such as this between two giants in their respective fields points the way towards an integrated, targeted approach which will be enormously beneficial to ordinary people who can tap into the power of the technology which surrounds us for the greater good.

By Jeremy Daniel

CloudTweaks Comics
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5 Ways The Internet of Things Will Drive Cloud Growth

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Report: Enterprise Cloud Computing Moves Into Mature Growth Phase

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The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise Of BI Data And How To Use It Effectively

The Rise of BI Data Every few years, a new concept or technological development is introduced that drastically improves the business world as a whole. In 1983, the first commercially handheld mobile phone debuted and provided workers with an unprecedented amount of availability, leading to more productivity and profits. More recently, the Cloud has taken…

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority Research has revealed that third parties cause 63 percent of all data breaches. From HVAC contractors, to IT consultants, to supply chain analysts and beyond, the threats posed by third parties are real and growing. Deloitte, in its Global Survey 2016 of third party risk, reported…

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

Individuals and Password-Sharing With the 1980s came the explosion of computing. In 1980, the Commodore ushered in the advent of home computing. Time magazine declared 1982 was “The Year of the Computer.” By 1983, there were an estimated 10 million personal computers in the United States alone. As soon as computers became popular, the federal government…

Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

The True Meaning of Availability What is real availability? In our line of work, cloud service providers approach availability from the inside out. And in many cases, some never make it past their own front door given how challenging it is to keep the lights on at home let alone factors that are out of…

Connecting With Customers In The Cloud

Connecting With Customers In The Cloud

Customers in the Cloud Global enterprises in every industry are increasingly turning to cloud-based innovators like Salesforce, ServiceNow, WorkDay and Aria, to handle critical systems like billing, IT services, HCM and CRM. One need look no further than Salesforce’s and Amazon’s most recent earnings report, to see this indeed is not a passing fad, but…

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

How to Identify and Authenticate in the Expanding IoT Ecosystem It is a necessity to protect IoT devices and their associated data. As the IoT ecosystem continues to expand, the need to create an identity to newly-connected things is becoming increasingly crucial. These ‘things’ can include anything from basic sensors and gateways to industrial controls…

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

Hybrid-Cloud Approach For over 20 years, organizations have been attempting to secure their networks and protect their data. However, have any of their efforts really improved security? Today we hear journalists and industry experts talk about the erosion of the perimeter. Some say it’s squishy, others say it’s spongy, and yet another claims it crunchy.…

5 Things To Consider About Your Next Enterprise Sharing Solution

5 Things To Consider About Your Next Enterprise Sharing Solution

Enterprise File Sharing Solution Businesses have varying file sharing needs. Large, multi-regional businesses need to synchronize folders across a large number of sites, whereas small businesses may only need to support a handful of users in a single site. Construction or advertising firms require sharing and collaboration with very large (several Gigabytes) files. Financial services…