Category Archives: Technology

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – The Force

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – The Force

Star Wars IoT CES

By David Fletcher

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CES 2016: Welcome To The Future

CES 2016: Welcome To The Future

Welcome To The Future

CES 2016 is hitting its stride in Las Vegas as many the leading global manufacturers’ role out their flagship innovations in the hope of attracting the attention of the international tech media.

Let’s take a further look at some exciting innovations in the cloud and SaaS space.

Of particular interest to a lot of marketers will be the launch of a product which could revolutionize advertising as we know it. Innovative data science and media technology company 4C launched a SaaS TV Synced Product onto market. Essentially, it allows marketers to respond to content in real time with appropriate advertising across multiple platforms.

eMarketer reports that only “10 percent of marketers say their messaging, execution, and delivery are aligned across touch points“. 4C claims that it’s new product can “launch online display banners, video, rich media as well as search and social ads on smartphones, tablets, laptops and desktops within seconds of a specific event or program airing on live TV.”

Imagizer Media Engine

Another cloud application was announced by Silicon Valley image specialists Ambrella, who released the Imagizer Media Engine for app developers who find themselves requiring some form of image processing software. It’s engine is an “on-demand, easy to integrate solution is available on Amazon AWS marketplace, and requires no contracts or long-term commitments. Fees for using this cloud software are simply added to user’s own AWS invoice.

Netflix

While much of the developed world has come to view Netflix as a service that you take for granted, like instant coffee or high-speed internet, for the vast majority of the planet the idea of an efficient, affordable Video-On-Demand service has remained a pipe dream. But all that has just changed.
During Netflix CEO Reed Hastings’ keynote address, he casually announced that Netflix had just been switched on for over 130 countries around the world. Reaction from financial markets was instant, with the Netflix share price closing up 9% on the day.

China still remains out of reach, along with countries like North Korea and Syria where there are laws against US companies operating. But other than that, it’s fair to say that Netflix has flicked the switch and become a global entertainment player, and introduced millions of new customers to the concept of video on demand.

e-Golf Touch

Volkswagen had a bruising 2015 and the company is really going to have to work hard to win back the hearts and minds of consumers. The e-Golf Touch is a step in the right direction. It boasts gesture controls for audio and wireless phone charging, which you’ve probably heard about before. But here’s a few unique concepts that are getting people talking. Firstly, there’s the SIRI-like voice control that lets you start the car by saying “Hello Volkswagen”. And “voice amplification, where the driver and front passenger are picked up by embedded mics and piped over speakers in the rear passenger compartment so it’s easier to carry a conversation.” They’re also launching “Personalization 2.0, which lets a visiting driver customize the car according to settings they’ve got in the cloud. That’s great for ride-sharing.

Old School New Tech

A fusion of old school styling with cutting edge software seems to be the major trend at this year’s showcase. Take Sony’s new PS-HX500 as an example. It’s a simple vinyl turntable that will play your records, while at the same time, “it’s busy converting your beloved vinyl albums into Hi-Res audio files, whether in Sony’s own DSD format or in 24-bit WAV files. From there, you can send the DSD copies on to your Hi-Res-playing Sony Walkman and enjoy a transition from the joys of fully-analog vinyl playback to lossless digital format without any MP3 interference in between.

Tech Partnerships 

All around the conference, some really interesting partnerships began to emerge which signaled a growing maturity amongst leading tech developers. Companies are choosing to focus on doing what they do best and working together with others to maximize their potential for customers who desire efficiency and quality over strict brand loyalty. Microsoft and Volvo, Ford and Amazon, HTC and UnderArmour – these kind of working relationships should deliver great products for consumers in the very near future.

By Jeremy Daniel

Transforming The Travel & Transportation Industry With IoT

Transforming The Travel & Transportation Industry With IoT

Travel and Transportation Industry

The travel industry is a huge infrastructure of roads, water, rails, air and more. What if there was a greater force behind all these moving parts, something to help travel and transportation companies maximize profits and the customer experience? Consider for a moment the involvement of IoT and what this means for travel.

With estimated 64,285,009 km roadways worldwide, there were approximately over 7 million drivers in the US involved in property damage crashes in 2013 alone. In 2012, 808 million passenger cars and 291 million commercial vehicles were used throughout the world. It may also be alarming to find out that drivers in the US wasted 9 Billion hours by being stuck in traffic.

iot-travel-makeover-infog

(Infographic Source: IBM)

However, the travel system doesn’t stop with commercial roadway traffic; in fact, by the end of 2013 148 cities around the world had a metro system that made 150 million passenger trips every day, which wasted 3 billion gallons of fuel.

Trade and transit is also affected. On average, to move containers from Los Angeles ports to the city of Chicago is 120 hours. In 2014, the top 10 airlines around the world shipped 85,858 million freight tonne-kilometers.

While these statistics may be alarming, by the year 2035 U.S Commercial air carriers will transport 1.14B passengers a total of 44 trillion miles. So what could the future of IoT hold for the travel and transportation industry? The data collected allows transportation companies to drive better efficiency and lower their costs by enhancing the delivery and travel experience of their customers. This type of data is a pathway for companies to maximize their performance and profits.

By Shirley Lange

SaaS Growth Hacking Do’s And Don’t

SaaS Growth Hacking Do’s And Don’t

SaaS Growth Hacking

Thanks to a few phenomenally successful campaigns and visions of best case scenarios, growth hacking tactics have received a lot of positive attention in recent times. But as the techniques and their results are analyzed it’s becoming apparent that there’s a right and a wrong way to use these tools. Or, at least, there’s a time, a place, and an implementation. Cloud Based Software As A Service (SaaS) companies such as Dropbox, Pinterest, and Airbnb boast a few of the most wildly successful strategies contrived to date (Excellent 2015 Marketing Statistics List), but with the ever-evolving global tech and business climate, ‘old’ tactics aren’t likely to yield positive results without new twists on the invention.

marketing-growth-hacking

The Dos

Never again will we see massive success stories that are merely revamps of old hits – unless you’re writing teen vampire novels, in which case give it 10 to 15 years. Video marketing is a trend expected to flourish in 2016, and additionally ensuring your growth hacks account for the massive traffic routed by search engines and social networks could ramp up achievements.

  • A few key points to keep in mind: Match-make growth hacking and products/services: You’re going to need a synergy between the two, ideally with a key representative closely involved in the development of both.
  • Spot trends: All the information you could possibly need is flying about, but Big Data often results in a case of not seeing the wood for all the trees. Learn to extract pertinent points but also know when to back off. Just because you think something rocks, doesn’t mean anyone else is going to care, and a rework is likely to yield better results than soldiering on.
  • Change the way you think: Growth hacking comes into play when traditional marketing methods aren’t likely to succeed. This isn’t the time for crossing your ‘T’s and dotting your ‘I’s. Be creative, think outside of the box, and be willing to take calculated risks.
  • Communicate & Incentivize: Creative doesn’t mean disorganized. Ensure your communication is easily understood and followed by both your team and your potential customers. And then save money by getting your customers to market for you – a little freebie often goes a long way to positive word of mouth and heightened product uptake.

shutterstock_325151036

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

The Don’ts

  • Sadly, there is no growth hacking template or checklist. Strategies and tactics often work only once, and success usually boils down to the right attitude, genuine curiosity, and the ability to try, and fail, adapt, and invent.
  • Popularity alone only survives through high school: Simply creating a buzz isn’t enough. If you’re building products or services that don’t have the end users in mind, no amount of popularity will result in success. Unless you’ve built a pyramid scheme that is, at the very least, frowned upon in many countries, illegal in most. Back to the drawing board, please.
  • Don’t forget about loyalty: Many businesses focus on building up new users before ensuring the satisfaction of the loyal early adopters. Growth hacks that run roughshod over your faithful flock in an attempt to recruit new masses miss the success that personal referrals, word of mouth, and client satisfaction promise.
  • Don’t be aggressive: This isn’t telecanvassing. Aggressive, underhanded strategies trample on your reputation and miss the point of the clever loopholes that drive customer numbers as well as satisfaction.

Unless you’re selling thin in chocolate sauce, your product won’t sell itself: Don’t let the beauty of your growth hack so over-awe you that you forget to measure its success. Analyze your data, find out what’s working, and optimize it. Repeat…

By Jennifer Klostermann

Help Your Business Improve Security By Choosing The Right Cloud Provider

Help Your Business Improve Security By Choosing The Right Cloud Provider

Choosing The Right Cloud Provider

Security issues have always been a key aspect of business planning; failure to properly protect your assets, your inventory, and your customer data is guaranteed to set a company on a road to ruin.

In the pre-digital age security was reasonably easy to manage, but the introduction of computers and the onset of cloud-computing has quickly expanded the number of weak points in an organisation’s set up, not to mention provided a new opportunity to a different group of would-be criminals.

Make no mistake – cloud computing brings a huge number of benefits to any organisation, but it would be remiss to suggest that it doesn’t also bring challenges. Properly securing your company’s vital data is one such challenge.

That’s why it’s so important to choose a reputable and dependable cloud provider. While lesser-known providers may appeal on cost, a closer look may reveal serious flaws in other areas of their offering such as support, service level agreements, or security.

The Risks of Poor Cloud Security

It seems increasingly rare that a week goes by without news of a data-breach or security hack hitting the headlines – in the last eighteen months alone we’ve seen internationally-recognised companies such as JP Morgan, Ebay, Home Depot, and Target all fall victim, along with countless lesser-known companies and small or midsize businesses (SMBs).

security-cloud

The risks of a security breach are huge. Firstly, there are significant monetary costs associated with disaster recovery, data loss, crisis management, and implementation of new defences. For example, in America most states require firms to notify their entire client database if a breach is suspected, with the costs of doing so estimated at approximately $30 per client.

Secondly, there are opportunity costs with regard to lost intellectual property and loss of customer confidence. This loss can have a knock-on effect across all facets of a company, from shareholder value and corporate stability to business reputation and financial performance.

Alternatively, perhaps a company could find itself on the receiving end of a lawsuit from damages to customers, or there could be an e-business interruption arising from either a security failure or an internet virus.

Who is at Risk?

If you’re an IT professional or Business Development Manager in an SMB, it’s easy to read an article such as this and assume that it will never happen to you or your organisation. In reality, nothing could be further from the truth.

All companies are at risk, no matter their size or their location. For example, recent research suggests that half of all companies that suffer data breaches have fewer than 1,000 employees, while the perpetrator of the attack is equally likely to be one of your most trusted employees or sitting at a computer on the other side of the world.

The solution is using a reliable and secure cloud vendor.

Why Choose Microsoft Azure?

Why should you and your company choose Microsoft Azure over similar offerings from Amazon and Google? It’s an important question to consider, but the answer quickly becomes apparent once you delve into the respective services’ features.

shutterstock_303468863

Firstly, there is the issue of familiarity. Windows is comfortably the most-used operating system in the world, and for those users Azure will be quick to learn and understand. It naturally has excellent integration with existing on-premise systems such as Windows Server, System Center and Active Directory, and therefore Azure will be faster and simpler to implement.

Secondly, there is Microsoft’s commitment to a hybrid cloud strategy. Amazon (and to an extent, Google) have typically been somewhat dismissive towards the benefits of on-premise private clouds – and this is short-sighted. For example, lots of businesses need (and want) to keep sensitive data within their own data centres, and will utilise public clouds for other reasons. The ability for Azure to offer this benefit along with a consolidated platform for managing hybrid cloud components makes it the best choice.

What makes Azure so Secure?

Microsoft has always adopted a policy of responsibility when it comes to their Azure offering. In a recent blog post, they explained they had “three foundational pillars of the Azure security infrastructure” – to protect infrastructure, to detect fraud, and to respond to incidents.

Indeed, Azure is designed from the ground up with security in mind. For example, they have a “Secure Development Lifecycle” that seeks to embed security policies into every phase of the software design process. Part of this process is their “Assume Breach” strategy, whereby a product is designed under the assumption that a breach has already occurred, and they have a dedicated team of experts who simulate attacks, thus testing the products ability to detect and protect.

azure-secure

(Image Source:Shutterstock)

Beyond that, they have an “Operational Security Assurance” offering, which works to increase the infrastructure’s resilience by decreasing the amount of time needed to prevent, detect, and respond to security threats.

Once a product is live, Microsoft offers a global incident response team that is constantly working to negate the effects of any cyber-attack. The team is split in two parts – engineering (who investigate and resolve the issue), and communications (who draft information and guidance for affected customers).

Azure also makes use of the latest technology in the area of encryption and key management. It uses industry-standard protocols for data being sent between user devices and data centres, and includes an option for businesses to encrypt traffic between virtual machines and end users. For data that’s merely being stored, AES-256 encryption is used.

Lastly, their network security will use firewalls, partitioned local area networks, and physical separation to prevent unauthorised traffic being sent to and within their data centres.

Next Steps

If you know your business could benefit from making the jump to the cloud, but are concerned that security could be an issue, you can stop worrying. The simple advice is to make sure you choose an experienced provider that invests heavily in their own back-end security and that is transparent with their customers about what steps they take to maintain client safety.

With this in mind, there is no better choice for your organisation than Microsoft Azure – contact them for more details about what they can offer.

This post is brought to you by Microsoft Azure and Cloud for Tomorrow.

By Dan Price

Driving Success: 6 Key Metrics For Every Recurring Revenue Business

Driving Success: 6 Key Metrics For Every Recurring Revenue Business

Recurring Revenue Business Metrics

Recurring revenue is the secret sauce behind the explosive growth of powerhouses like Netflix and Uber. Unsurprisingly, recurring revenue is also quickly gaining ground in more traditional industries like healthcare and the automotive business. In fact, nearly half of U.S. businesses have adopted or are planning to adopt a recurring revenue model, now one of the dominant sales models in today’s connected digital economy.

IoT-DeviceToday, 226 million-plus adults take advantage of online subscription models, and the average consumer spends more than $850 in monthly subscription services, including: auto insurance, cell phone plans, health care premiums, and, of course, household utilities (cable, Internet, etc.). While impressive, these numbers will skyrocket as businesses continue to move towards usage-based services at the core of the Internet of Things (IoT), which is expected to total $8.9 trillion in sales by 2020.

Yet, success isn’t as simple as the plug and play philosophy that some might suggest. Selecting the right technology, business process, and pricing model is just the beginning. Seasoned pros measure performance every step of the way to maximize customer lifetime value and success.

I’ve tapped the experts and asked them to weigh in with their “winning formulas.” Their responses reflected that while there’s a core set of key indicators, there’s plenty of discussion about which “go to” metric best predicts recurring revenue success.

And while there’s no particular order to the core metrics listed below, the importance of each varies with the individual business and its goals. Each is a solid indicator of a healthy (or unhealthy) recurring revenue business. Helping businesses get and stay competitive is the impetus.

Here are six favorite metrics for measuring recurring revenue success:

  • ARB – Annual Recurring Billings
    Formula: The sum of all customers’ annual subscriptions and/or usage

My personal pick is a summation of the expected total yearly billings of your customers’ annual subscriptions and usage fees. ARB is what I call the “true north” because it represents the actual cash flow irrespective of GAAP revenue recognition. All roads lead to ARB, including: annual contract value, renewed bookings, upsells, cross-sells, and retention. It’s essential in understanding your success in building customer relationships.

ARB shows you the big picture over time of how your recurring revenue efforts are performing, but you can also use it more granularly. For example, you can track recurring revenue generated from new sales versus renewals or from upsell/cross-sell. Conversely, you can also apply ARB to monitor losses from downgrades, churn, and so forth.

  • Usage Level Deciles
    Formula: To Calculate a Decile or Any Quantile

Aria Systems’ co-founder, Brendan O’Brien, looks to Usage Level Deciles to make business decisions based on customers’ consumption over time. A decile is simply defined as “any of the nine values that divide the sorted data into ten equal parts, so that each part represents 1/10 of the sample or population.” Correspondingly, Usage Level Deciles look at usage across the entire customer base, and then break everyone into ten groups. With this, you can then graph usage patterns and study how these patterns change over time. “Usage Level Deciles provide actionable insight into whether the customers I am losing, gaining, or keeping use and value the service I provide,” O’Brien says. For example, “you can study churn rates for each decile to gain insights into customer behavior and improve retention. If customers in high usage deciles are churning at accelerated rates, product and customer experience needs to improve. If customers in low usage deciles are churning more frequently, further training and adoption measures might be in order.”

  • Total Contract Value (TCV)
    Formula: TCV = (MRR x # of months) + any one time revenue + any contracted services revenue Or TCV = (ARR x # of years) + any one time revenue + any contracted services revenues

A key metric from Andrew Dailey, Managing Director of MGI Research, measures Total Contract Value (TCV). It is the summation of the values of all contract terms, inclusive of all revenue types and length of term. “TCV is a key financial indicator of a business and a prerequisite for undertaking proper analysis and valuation of a company,” said Dailey.

  • Average Revenue Per Unit (ARPU)
    Formula: ARPU = Total Revenue ÷ # of Subscribers

A metric from Ted Brookbank, Senior Vice President of Advanced Technology Group, determines the average revenue per unit (ARPU). The ARPU is a revenue calculation often used by communications and networking companies and other subscription-based services where users pay varying fees depending on the type of contract and usage. Brookbank says, “ARPU has always been a key benchmark in communications and other services industries because it provides insight into which product lines are profitable and driving growth.”

  • Conversion Rates or CR
    Formula: # of unique trial plan subscriptions ÷ # of unique visitors Or # of paid plan subscriptions ÷ # of unique visitors Or # of upgrades from free trials to paid plans ÷ # of free trial plan subscriptions

Karishma Karnik, Senior Program Manager of HERE, a Nokia company, looks at conversion rates (CR). CR includes the percentage of unique website visitors who sign up for a plan (free or paid) and the percentage of those who sign up for free trials and upgrade. “Conversion rates impact recurring revenue by giving us insight into consumer behavior, the usability of our website, and the popularity of our various product offerings,” Karnik explains.

  • Customer Net Profitability Value, or CNPV
    Formula: CNPV = Revenue – Customer Acquisition Costs

Jeffrey Kaplan, Consultant at THINKStrategies, favors Customer Net Profitability Value (CNPV). It measures the cost of acquisition and retention against the revenue provided by each customer. “CNPV provides a better metric for properly targeting a company’s sales and marketing efforts to attract profitable customers,” says Kaplan.

As noted, an increasing number of businesses are adopting recurring revenue models. They allow customers to have a plethora of options, including more creative packaging, promotions, and delivery of goods and services.

And, while these metrics are valuable, they aren’t created equal. It’s important to understand what the business’ individual goals are and pay attention to metrics specific to measuring against those goals. Choose ones that fit your business model, pay attention to what they tell you, adjust accordingly, and then repeat. Quarter after quarter. Year after year.

For more information and additional metrics, see the corresponding infographic below.

Aria_Recurring-Revenue-Infographic_Final-1-4-15_001-compressor (1)

By Tom Dibble

 

5 Early CES 2016 Announcements Placing The Cloud Front And Center

5 Early CES 2016 Announcements Placing The Cloud Front And Center

5 Early CES 2016 Announcements

The annual Consumer Electronics Showcase (CES) kicks off in Las Vegas this morning, and already there are a slew of high profile, cloud-related announcements from a wide variety of companies. From big names like BMW and Samsung to startups trying to break into the public eye, it’s clear that the Internet of Things and cloud-based connectivity is gathering pace and will dominate the technology conversation for many years to come.

We’ve sifted through much of the PR to find a few key cloud innovations that are lighting up the annual Vegas tech fest.

Let’s take a look at some of the key early offerings:

Tech blog ZDNet is reporting on Cisco’s plans for the cloud – “Building off its recent acquisition of cloud video startup 1 Mainstream, Cisco is bolstering its Infinite Video for delivering live and on-demand video content to via local network or over-the-top (OTT) TV services. Cisco’s plan is to blend cloud hardware with open source software to streamline and speed up these operations.”

Smart Autos

Meanwhile Slashgear is impressed by the evolution of the BMW’s very own Internet of Things – “BMW’s Internet of Things grows with the intelligent Open Mobility Cloud, connecting such systems as BMW i3 and Smart Home devices – like your phone or your smart watch. To grow their own Internet of Things, BMW has devices like the Mobility Mirror to act as display medium and mirror at the same time, connecting to the cloud as it does so. BMW Connected is a prototype personalized digital assistant – a bit of software for multiple devices – apps and programs. This system works with the Open Mobility Cloud, allowing the user to connect at home or outside the home, in the user’s vehicle, or on public transport. – SLASHGEAR

Personal Storage

cyber-monday

Personal cloud storage is a fast-growing area of focus for many companies and renowned blog MacRumors.com showcased the Apollo from Promise Technology – “High performance storage solutions company Promise Technology today announced its first foray into the consumer electronics market with the Apollo storage bank. The new device lets users, and a personal circle of private members, store and share data collected in the Apollo with the help of a companion app available to download from the iOS and Google Play App Stores. “Apollo marks a significant milestone for our company, and we are very excited to tap into the consumer market with a personal cloud device that makes it easy to store and share digital media,” said James Lee, CEO of PROMISE Technology. With Apollo, however, PROMISE has delivered a personal cloud storage device that’s affordable, secure, robust and—most importantly—easy to use.

BYOC

The Cloud is seen to be a powerful new weapon in the fight for a healthier planet and popular hardware company Acer is launching some pioneering new software, according to DigiTimes – “IT vendor Acer is showcasing cloud computing-based health monitoring and remote diagnostics solutions through cooperation with hardware and software partners at its BOYC (build your own cloud) exhibition booth at the 2016 Consumer Electronics Show. The health monitoring solution is for users to continually measure vital signals such as blood pressure and home air quality and upload data to a cloud computing-based management platform through the Acer Open Platform (AOP) for analysis by medical professionals, Acer said. If abnormalities are detected, medical professionals will provide medical advice or notify providers of health care services.”

The Fridge

Finally, consumer electronics giant Samsung wants to be central to the evolving internet of things and is showcasing the Family Hub at CES.

British tech publication IBTimes reports, “The fridge, with an internal camera, can display on its giant screen all the contents, apart from letting the user have a peek into the fridge without opening its doors. Additionally, one can check on the contents remotely on a smartphone, through an app that connects to the fridge’s internal camera. Grocery shopping will no longer involve forgetting items as users can remotely check on what is available and what needs to be stocked up.

These are just five incredible innovations that are kicking off CES 2016 in what is being unofficially dubbed “The Year of the Cloud”. No doubt there is much more to come over the next few days but we can already safely say that, judging from CES 2016, the cloud definitely has a silver lining.

By Jeremy Daniel

Containerization: The Bold Face Of The Cloud In 2016

Containerization: The Bold Face Of The Cloud In 2016

Containerization And The Cloud

Right now, the biggest technology shift in the cloud is a rapid evolution from simple virtual machine (VM) hosting toward containerization’’ says the CTO of Microsoft Azure, Mark Russinovitch, a man who deals with the evolving cloud infrastructure every day. In his words, containerization is “an incredibly efficient, portable, and lightweight cloud technology that saves significant operating system overhead costs and dramatically improves application time-to-market.” Increasingly, it’s becoming the standard when it comes to cloud-based apps.

mark-russinovichWhile cloud computing has been a buzzword in business circles for years, it’s only recently that it has crossed over into the public domain, to the extent that many are hailing 2016 as The Year of the Cloud. More and more organizations are relying more and more heavily on this sophisticated technology that provides efficiency and flexibility across the web. The cloud has evolved to respond to this surge of interest, and the lines between PaaS and IaaS have begun to blur. Russinovitch explains that “this “blurring” is important because as more things are moved to the cloud, making them work together seamlessly is not just a ‘nice to have’—it’s a critical necessity.

Containers are a key component of the uptake of cloud services. So what exactly is containerization? Webopedia defines it as “a lightweight alternative to full machine virtualization that involves encapsulating an application in a container with its own operating environment.”

What this effectively means is that “you can pack many more containers on a host machine than you can virtual machines. That stands to reason, because each VM is a self-contained system in its own right, with its own operating system and virtualized hardware and its own unique resources allocated to it,” according to ServerWatch.

Container Growth

The stellar growth in the use of containers is in large part due to a company called Docker, which has used open-source software to revolutionize the deployment of applications. With Docker, you can build your applications from microservices “without worrying about inconsistencies between development and production environments.” You are also able to ship the app and to deploy scalable services in a reliable manner on a wide variety of platforms.

infographic-docker-survey

(Infographic Source: Stackengine based on 2015 Survey)

Essentially, what Docker has brought to the market via the cloud is a simple, reliable and affordable way to quickly ship, build and run distributed, scalable applications.

Simon Crosby, CTO of Bromium explains the appeal of containers: “Instead of having 100 VMs per server, what if I can give you thousands of hardware-isolated applications?” Crosby said. “And, it’s not just about efficiency. I don’t want to have to boot an instance of Windows or Linux every time I want a new application. That’s just a total waste of time.”

Mixed Views

To be fair, not everyone is as bullish about this development. Brian Kirsch, an IT architect and instructor at Milwaukee Area Technical College: “I see container nightmares coming because of the chance of a shared back-end failure causing widespread outages,” Kirsch said. “One of the biggest things when you look at the benefits of container-based virtualization is its ability to squeeze more and more things onto a single piece of hardware for cost savings. While that is good for budgets, it is excessively horrible when things go bad.”

But with high-level organizations such as Spotify, Paypal and Rackspace all investing serious time and energy into containerization, it seems assured that we’ll be hearing a lot more about containerization in the near future.

By Jeremy Daniel

CloudTweaks Comics
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Three Tips To Simplify Governance, Risk and Compliance

Three Tips To Simplify Governance, Risk and Compliance

Governance, Risk and Compliance Businesses are under pressure to deliver against a backdrop of evolving regulations and security threats. In the face of such challenges they strive to perform better, be leaner, cut costs and be more efficient. Effective governance, risk and compliance (GRC) can help preserve the business’ corporate integrity and protect the brand,…

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

Individuals and Password-Sharing With the 1980s came the explosion of computing. In 1980, the Commodore ushered in the advent of home computing. Time magazine declared 1982 was “The Year of the Computer.” By 1983, there were an estimated 10 million personal computers in the United States alone. As soon as computers became popular, the federal government…

Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Out-of-the-box Cloud Solutions Although people may argue that data is not safe in the Cloud because using cloud infrastructure requires trusting another party to look after mission critical data, cloud services actually are more secure than legacy systems. In fact, a recent study on the state of cloud security in the enterprise market revealed that…

The Future Of Cloud Storage And Sharing…

The Future Of Cloud Storage And Sharing…

Box.net, Amazon Cloud Drive The online (or cloud) storage business has always been a really interesting industry. When we started Box in 2005, it was a somewhat untouchable category of technology, perceived to be a commodity service with low margins and little consumer willingness to pay. All three of these factors remain today, but with…

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Cloud Email Migration In today’s litigious society, preserving your company’s data is a must if you (and your legal team) want to avoid hefty fines for data spoliation. But what about when you move to the cloud? Of course, you’ve probably thought of this already. You’ll have a migration strategy in place and you’ll carefully…

Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

The True Meaning of Availability What is real availability? In our line of work, cloud service providers approach availability from the inside out. And in many cases, some never make it past their own front door given how challenging it is to keep the lights on at home let alone factors that are out of…

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Once upon a time, only a select few companies like Google and Salesforce possessed the knowledge and expertise to operate efficient cloud infrastructure and applications. Organizations patronizing those companies benefitted with apps that offered new benefits in flexibility, scalability and cost effectiveness. These days, the sharp division between cloud and on-premises infrastructure…

Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

There is a Difference – So Stop Comparing We are all familiar with the old saying “That’s like comparing apples to oranges” and though we learned this lesson during our early years we somehow seem to discount this idiom when discussing the Cloud. Specifically, IT buyers often feel justified when comparing the cost of a…