Category Archives: Technology

Wearable Technology Inches Even Closer To Being The Norm

Wearable Technology Inches Even Closer To Being The Norm

Wearable Technology Mainstream

Wearable technology is inching ever closer to going mainstream with the launch of a number of new smartwatches from various high-end brands and a groundbreaking conference in Toronto called the Wearable Entertainment & Sports conference.

Upstart smartwatch company Pebble launched its latest product, a new smartwatch called the Pebble Time Round. First reviews of the watch have been complimentary, particularly with regard to the look and feel of the device. Mashable product analyst Richard Wong is calling it “a modern take on the Swatch watch….The thin design (even with its large bezel) and narrow leather band make this arguably the most watch-like smartwatch we’ve seen.”

The Pebble launch was followed in quick succession by fashion brand Fossil announcing its first android-enabled smartwatch called the Fossil Q Founder – a smartwatch ‘born out of a partnership between Intel and Fossil’, while renowned watchmaker TAG Heuer launches the Carrera Connected smartwatch in New York with a price tag of $1500, and claims it will have ‘almost the same functions as an Apple Watch’ according to tech blog 9 to 5 Mac.


(Infographic Source: Raconteur

Yet the wearables market, and in particular, smartwatches are still waiting for that one breakout product that changes everything. The launch of the Apple Watch made consumers everywhere aware of the new category of products that are arriving, yet the price and availability has prevented the product from going totally mainstream. Still, that hasn’t stopped other watchmakers from jumping into the new tech category.

Of course, it’s not just the fashion industry where wearables are making an impact. A fascinating ethical conversation took place at the Wearable Entertainment & Sports conference, with regard to the ‘big data’ that is collected from professional athletes.

While companies like Fitbit and Garmin monitor basic information about performance, there is a whole new generation of gadgets about to hit the market that will be measuring almost everything an athlete is doing at any given time. “Montreal-based Hykso, for example, is developing sensors about the size of a watch face that sits in a boxer’s hand wraps to feedback real-time data about speed, power and technique,” reports The Star.

The question needs to be asked: at what point is the data collecting from wearable technology infringing on an athlete’s right to privacy. Where do you draw the line?

As the National Post reported it: “Data could in theory be used with only the player’s best interests in mind, [but] it could also be used to bring the hammer at contract time: It says here you were 3 km/h slower in the last month of the season, son, and historical data shows that this predicts a drop off in production the following season. Thus, please accept this 25% reduction in your compensation.”

Nevertheless, it seems that the genie is well and truly out of the box with this one, and it’s only a matter of time before wearables become embedded in the mainstream. Conference organizer Tom Emrich told The Star online that ‘’sports are one of the more obvious areas where wearables can improve efficiency and productivity, yet the same principles can be applied to industrial applications such as monitoring the health of employees working in dangerous conditions or providing direct contact with employees working in the field.”

By Jeremy Daniel

7 Common Cloud Security Missteps

7 Common Cloud Security Missteps

Cloud Security Missteps

Cloud computing remains shrouded in mystery for the average American. The most common sentiment is, “It’s not secure.” Few realize how many cloud applications they access every day: Facebook, Gmail, Uber, Evernote, Venmo, and the list goes on and on… People flock to cloud services for convenient solutions to everyday tasks. They are so easy to start using that consumers rarely think twice about setting up an account or downloading a new app.

Regardless of whether you acknowledge it, cloud usage incurs risk to your personal information. The data breaches in the news have much worse repercussions than just the need to reset your password. Cloud usage from your phone or computer may expose your data to criminal hackers who sell the information on the black market, or Darkweb.


Of course, no one advocates for avoiding cloud use altogether – an attitude analogous to keeping money safe (but idle) under your mattress. Cloud services enable a brave new world of productivity and convenience, and consumers and businesses should take full advantage of these benefits. At the same time, you should be aware of common threats and take steps to minimize the risk that a wrong click leads to a fraudulent charge call with your credit card company.

A recent trend in the cybersecurity industry has removed the “blame” of security failures from technology users and shifted the focus to making security easy. With that in mind, there are simple choices people make online that affect the likelihood of becoming a victim to cybercrime. You don’t have to be a security engineer to beat the vast majority of hacking attempts.

Take heed of these common cyber security pitfalls:

1. Misstep: You lost control of your data because of the fine print in a user agreement. Solution: Many cloud services claim ownership of any uploaded data, even after you delete your account. These tricky rules are hidden in plain sight in the terms and conditions. Companies don’t expect you to read all the fine print, and I don’t either. 15 seconds of online research can go a long way before using a new cloud service. Google, “_______ shady user agreement.”

2. Misstep: You sent out a public link to a Google Doc so others could view and edit.

Solution: Creating a public link is a convenient way to share a common document, but this means literally anyone who guesses the link can view the document. You may not care about your grocery list getting loose on the internet, but even documents like a party-planning sheet may have your address or other information you want to keep private. To restrict access, invite email addresses instead.

3. Misstep: You’re a celebrity and had private information leaked from your iCloud.

Solution: This is the famous celebrity nude photo catastrophe. Attackers correctly entered their victims’ passwords, either by brute force (multiple guessing attempts) or with previously stolen passwords. You may not be a famous model, but hackers commonly rely on this same method to steal information from any given application.

iCloud, the service provider in this case, is not necessarily insecure, since attackers gained access in the same way the account owners do. It’s the user’s responsibility to confirm their identity, and sometimes a password alone doesn’t suffice. Multi-factor authentication can almost always prevent this type of attack and is a key measure for any service with sensitive information. You can follow these directions to set up two-factor verification for iCloud.


4. Misstep: You use the same password for every app on your phone.

Solution: The previous tip discussed how attackers can gain access to your sensitive information by guessing or using a stolen password. Don’t make it easy for them! If you use the same password for all online services, a breach at Twitter may give attackers entrance into your bank, Amazon, and corporate email accounts. Use a password manager to minimize the damage in the event a single service gets breached.

5. Misstep: Web trackers are storing information on the sites you visit online.

Solution: Just like any hunter, knowing where you like to go online helps hackers target and execute attacks. Visiting just a few web pages can attract nearly 50 different tracking services. Many web trackers are useful for the services you use, but they can also pose a security and privacy liability. Services like Ghostery let you selectively choose who can track you, so only sites you trust receive your information.

6. Misstep: You granted an application every permission under the sun.

Solution: Applications request authorization for device permissions, but sometimes these can overstep boundaries. Be discerning when services seem to overstep their bounds by requesting access to contacts or even your camera, for example. These permissions can cost you money by making phone calls, violate privacy, or make a malicious attack more dangerous. Look out for permissions that seem unnecessary for the application’s function.

7. Misstep: A small mobile app startup you know nothing about has access to your banking data.

Solution: Your bank spends hundreds of millions of dollars on protecting your account, but that brand new financial app may not implement the same level of security. When you give a service full access to your financial information, you’re essentially circumventing your bank’s security. Keep your bank account secure by applying the tips above to any financial app you use. You should also limit access to only the necessary services, some of which ask for more permissions. A good rule of thumb is to be extra discerning of any service that requires you to enter your online banking password within the app. On the other hand, services that send you back to your banking app to authenticate don’t have as much control.

The Bottom Line: Don’t be afraid of the cloud. On the contrary, the typical user is probably better off storing even sensitive information in the cloud. The human is almost always the weak link in security. Cloud services are designed to be easy to use, security features included. When you store data in the cloud, someone can’t get your information just by stealing your computer or phone. And it’s a lot easier to implement multi-factor authentication and encryption on a cloud service than on your own personal device. Plus, you get to take advantage of all the convenience and mobility of cloud. So enjoy those apps, but take a few extra minutes to reduce the risk that a cybercriminal will ruin your week.

By Harold Byun

Local Motors To Sell World’s First 3D-Printed Electric Car

Local Motors To Sell World’s First 3D-Printed Electric Car

3D-Printed Electric Car

Local Motors, a low-volume car manufacturing company based in Phoenix Arizona, announced plans to sell the world’s first 3D-printed electric car in 2017, ratifying the promise of additive manufacturing, a process used to synthesize three-dimensional objects, also known as 3D printing. The LM3D Swim is the company’s first 3D-printed car for the consumer market. Last year, Local Motors displayed a prototype vehicle, calling it the Strati 3D car, which took 44 hours to print.

Designed by Portland-based artist, Kevin Lo, the LM3D Swim has a beach buggy design that emanates a fun and playful aesthetic. It has a bright red color, and features outward-facing speakers at the sides, although Local Motors decided to omit them for fear of disturbing the crowd. Suppose you don’t like the beach buggy design, the company is planning to release a Sport model. What is interesting here is that you can swap the Swim chassis with the Sport frame, without replacing the underside hull.

This means you can buy the Swim model and replace its chassis later with a Sport framework, giving you limitless possibilities, thanks to the wonders of 3D printing. Local Motors believes in “form over function,” so it wants its cars to look different while using the same platform—a body made of 80 percent ABS plastic and 20 percent carbon fiber materials. For now, around 75 percent of the LM3D will be 3D-printed, however, the goal is to print 90 percent of the car, the company said.

Companies Racing To The Printing Line

3D Printing

Local Motors also collaborated with IBM to integrate IoT technology using its IBM Watson, a supercomputer, into the 3D-printed car. The company also tapped Siemens for its Solid Edge CAD modeling, IDEO to renew the Local Motors Labs, and SABIC to improve the quality of the materials used. The company expects to complete all necessary certifications by the end of 2016 and exceed Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards by 2017.
Unlike traditional cars, which could take years to design and manufacture, the LM3D 3D-printed car takes only two months to complete, from design to prototype, Local Motors claims. Moreover, with companies like Google, Tesla, General Motors, Apple and most recently, Toyota are racing to get their respective electric and autonomous cars to the public, Local Motors is in the right direction. The LM3D series will be available for purchase in late 2016 for roughly $53,000.

The expected delivery date will be sometime in 2017…

By Gene Briones

Toyota Invests $1 Billion In Futuristic Cars

Toyota Invests $1 Billion In Futuristic Cars

TOKYO (AP) — Toyota is investing $1 billion in a research company it’s setting up in Silicon Valley to develop artificial intelligence and robotics, underlining the Japanese automaker’s determination to lead in futuristic cars that drive themselves and apply the technology to other areas of daily life.

Toyota Motor Corp. President Akio Toyoda said Friday the company will start operating from January 2016, with 200 employees at a Silicon Valley facility near Stanford University. A second facility will be established near Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge.

The investment, which will be spread over five years, comes on top of $50 million Toyota announced earlier for artificial intelligence research at Stanford and MIT.

Toyota said its interest extended beyond autonomous driving, which is starting to be offered by some automakers and being promised by almost all of them. The technology was pointing to a new industry for everyday use, delivering a safer lifestyle overall, it said…

Read Full Article: Associated Press

How To Overcome Data Insecurity In The Cloud

How To Overcome Data Insecurity In The Cloud

Data Insecurity In The Cloud

Today’s escalating attacks, vulnerabilities, breaches, and losses have cut deeply across organizations and captured the attention of, regulators, investors and most importantly customers. In many cases such incidents have completely eroded customer trust in a company, its services and its employees. The challenge of ensuring data security is far more complicated across public cloud models where there is shared ownership. As key business stakeholders in your company can you attest to who has access to your data in the public cloud models you use and most importantly that your customer’s data has not been tampered with, corrupted, or leaked?

The New Data Economy


We are moving towards a data economy, where data is a core component of the value of the service or product that is delivered to the customer. In our hyper-connected world data streams are becoming far more personal and intimate than previously. Consider a connected bathroom scale where weight loss or gain patterns might be transmitted from a scale to a backend cloud and where as part of the product, customers have the ability to study their weight patterns over periods of time.

Despite a widespread recognition in the industry of the value and importance of customer data, we live in a perpetual state of data insecurity. It’s not only about the high profile data breaches but it’s also about minimizing accidental risk vectors. In the cloud well intentioned employees who don’t consider the ramifications of oversharing on social media sites, or who accidentally drag and drop sensitive documents from their desktops into email or who upload regulated data into insecure file shares to avoid corporate security measures may be your organization’s biggest risk vector.

Internal Data Marketplace


At the CloudExpo Asia conference last week I referred to the sliver lining in the data insecurity issue. The effects of data loss, misuse and leakage are driving a very necessary change across the business landscape and executives are beginning to get educated on data security issues.

Following are three key steps I recommend to executives as they look to beef up their data security programs with a lens on public cloud

1. Build an internal data marketplace: Organizations need to know the value of their data in order to make the right decisions about whether to host or transact their data in a particular cloud model, and thereafter how to protect it. To calculate the value of data, build an internal marketplace with user entitlements and access controls mapped accordingly. This encourages business users to treat data as part of the business P&L.

2. Learn from your data insecurity history: Organizations have a tendency to want to bury the past especially when it hasn’t been stellar. However, knowing how data has been used and abused in the past is an indicator of how it might be compromised and disclosed in the future. Studying loss trends over time can help organizations forecast future losses and improve prevention and mitigation strategies.

3. Make data protection business-consumable: This is a recurring theme in my writings. As business leaders rush to adopt new cloud applications security needs to partner much more strategically. The way that security classifies and treats data has to align to business and usage contexts. It’s protecting data, transactions and workstreams versus focusing only on building secure and compliant infrastructures that will help organizations win and retain customer trust in the long run.

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

By Evelyn de Souza

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Smartphone Mockery

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Smartphone Mockery


By Christian Mirra

Please feel free to share our comics via social media networks such as Twitter with a clear attribution (Twitter example: via @cloudtweaks) to the original comic source. If you are a company brand looking to utilize our comics to generate leads to a specific landing page, newsletter, presentation or social media campaign, you can contact us regarding commercial licensing rates. Enjoy!

Fundamentals Of A Cloud Strategy

Fundamentals Of A Cloud Strategy

Cloud Transition Planning For Your Business 

In case you have been hiding under a rock or have been ever consumed in keeping the lights on for your traditional IT landscape (more probable), you may have not had ‘The’ opportunity to lay out a Cloud transition plan for your organization.

Whether you are part of a Medium business or a larger Enterprise, your users likely already benefit from leveraging a hosted office collaboration applications e.g. Emails, Document Repository, Contact Management etc.. In all likelihood, these same users would prefer to expand usage to additional business applications (B2B, B2C etc…) allowing them enhanced mobility while reducing IT Capital & Operating costs (reducing Infrastrastructure costs etc…) and complexity.

cloud erp strategy

For most organizations, the primary hurdle is in identifying:

  • ‘When’ these investments must be made?
  • ‘Who’ will be impacted & ‘How’? and
  • ‘Why’ are these investments necessary? (Cost of Competitive advantages).

The larger the enterprise, the more complicated will be this transition plan. However, there are few fundamentals which will serve as a starting point to all.

Constituents of Deriving a Cloud Strategy:

For simplicity, I am merely listing the essential areas, while we can spend hours inventorizing, analyzing and discussing them in further detail.

cloud ideas

1. Assess your Current & Future Consumptions:

  • What applications or services are currently hosted and managed by internal IT organizations/ vendors?
  • Who do these applications cater to Your Employees, Partners & Your Customers?
  • Which of these applications would need to be Updated and When, to support your continued business growth?
  • Which of these application vendors have already a SaaS solution that you can transition to?

2. Understand your Business:

  • The current maturity level of your organization. What are your interoperability requirements for core operational groups (HR, Finance, ERP, SCM etc…)?
  • When it comes to Governance, Risk, and Compliance, there are no one-size-fits-all. What are your specific data security and compliance needs?
  • How will you build an eco-system for your Partners or Customers once you have translated to the Cloud?

3. Laying out the Plan:

  • Understand the Financial risks associated
  • How can you consolidate services and existing infrastructure/ investment?
  • Develop a cost effective plan to position a services ecosystem for your users instead of negotiating them individually

For smaller businesses, the benefit of migrating to a SaaS (Cloud) is can be more application can provide immediate ROI. For e.g. A SaaS application can immediately bring in mature capabilities/ operational efficiencies which were earlier only accessible to the Enterprises. A simple explanation can be a Lower Subscription pricing model (in comparison to perpetual license costs).

For complex Enterprises, ‘Cloud’ (applications/ vendors) does not need to be perceived as a competitor to its existing IT organization. While a pre-packaged PaaS application may provide its tech-savvy users an ability to conveniently build additional capabilities, it can also quickly add complexity and interoperability issues within its existing landscape. The benefits and challenges of Cloud computing and its provisioning (particularly in PaaS and IaaS) needs to be reviewed clearly with the business. This will enable business owners to understand the Security and Compliance issues in fragmenting capabilities across multiple vendors/ applications. Thereby enticing them to collaborate with IT Organizations and mature their adoption of Cloud applications over time.

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

By Sourin Paul

Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) And BYOD Security

Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) And BYOD Security

Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) 

Technology has changed the world radically. But, to date, the world hasn’t changed as fast as technology to. There are a couple of concepts that are concerning as we head into the reality of CPS-deployed systems. The first is that standards don’t exist.

Many companies are considering the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) conundrum, evaluating the value and cost (as well as the risk) of allowing employees to bring their own devices to work. The value for the company is that a single device now connects each employee to the company. It also connects them to their life, which means they will always have their work phone with them.

A Peak Inside

Pig-pen_peanutsIt opens a door, and once that door opens, not even Pandora will be able to close it.

My phone is a component of the personal operating space called my personal cloud. When you, as my employer, enable a BYOD program, you are inviting my personal cloud into the workplace. By default, you are also allowing me to connect my personal cloud to your network. The image that comes to mind here is of Charles Schulz’s character Pig Pen. My personal cloud extends all around me like Pig Pen’s dirt cloud.

Cyber Physical Systems


(Image Source: Wikipedia)

And there’s another problem to consider. CloudTweaks is full of articles on the ever- expanding reality of the Internet of Things (IoT), more properly called Cyber Physical Systems (CPS). Why CPS and personal clouds? Because your corporate network is connected to every single CPS device my phone is connected to. I am the Trojan horse. I bring the Greek warriors inside your corporate security and, without knowing it, I am also the one that opens the trap door.

Some of the devices I connect to are harmless. But, given that they are simple harmless devices, someone can modify them. Do I care if there is suddenly a red dot in the upper right corner of my home weather station? Nope, I just need to know how much rain is falling on my house. But that dot isn’t a nice dot. It is sort of the modern equivalent of a laser targeting dot. We see them on TV all the time, when the bad guy suddenly realizes there aren’t two guns pointed at him but 200. I can mandate that all BYOD devices have Bluetooth disabled and are not directly connected to the corporate Wi-Fi network, but I am just putting lipstick on a pig, as the old saying goes. Once that phone connects to and moves corporate data, I am at risk as a company.


Beyond the personal cloud, there is also the issue of the home cloud. I call it the home-private cloud because it is a stationary-managed solution that provides computation and storage for the people who live in my home. It, along with my personal cloud, are now happily connected to your network. My Trojan horse that I carry in my pocket is connected to an even bigger Trojan horse.

The Lighter Side Of The Cloud – Turmoil

Now, I am not advocating that enterprises send their IT security professionals to every house that connects to their network. There need to be easily managed personal and home-private cloud security standards, and by easy I mean automatically deployed. If you connect to a corporate network, that network can connect to the security control center of your network and verify that it hasn’t been modified or hacked. If it has, quarantine the phone so that the Trojan horse can’t be deployed. The same is true of my personal cloud. Having standards that include easily deployed and managed security settings will at least keep the horse in the barn. It won’t roll the Trojan horse into the middle of your corporate network and then hand it the keys and say, “Have at our corporate secrets.”

We need simple security standards for home-private and personal clouds.  They don’t have to include complex security rules. Rather, they could consist of a single chip in the phone and a single device in your home that will tell you if, in fact, that cloud has been compromised.

Dismantled Trojan horses make great firewood for the winter.

By Scott Andersen

CloudTweaks Comics
The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

A New Era for Cyber Crime Last September, the website of a well-known security journalist was hit by a massive DDoS attack. The site’s host stated it was the largest attack of that type they had ever seen. Rather than originating at an identifiable location, the attack seemed to come from everywhere, and it seemed…

Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

DDoS Knocks Out Several Websites Cyber attacks targeting the internet infrastructure provider Dyn disrupted service on major sites such as Twitter and Spotify on Friday, mainly affecting users on the U.S. East Coast. It was not immediately clear who was responsible. Officials told Reuters that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Bureau…

Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms Above DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms, malware is the most common incident that security teams reported responding to in 2014, according to a recent survey from SANS Institute and late-stage security startup AlienVault. The average cost of a data breach? $3.5 million, or $145 per sensitive…

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

Botnets and DDoS Attacks There’s just so much that seems as though it could go wrong with closed-circuit television cameras, a.k.a. video surveillance. With an ever-increasing number of digital eyes on the average person at all times, people can hardly be blamed for feeling like they’re one misfortune away from joining the ranks of Don’t…

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks!

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks!

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks! So we are all cheering as the FCC last week made the right choice in upholding the principle of net neutrality! For the general public it is a given that an ISP should be allowed to charge for bandwidth and Internet access but never to block or somehow…

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart  Breaches Formal verification is not a new concept. In a nutshell, the process uses sophisticated math to prove or disprove whether a system achieves its desired functional specifications. It is employed by organizations that build products that absolutely cannot fail. One of the reasons NASA rovers are still roaming Mars…

3 Keys To Keeping Your Online Data Accessible

3 Keys To Keeping Your Online Data Accessible

Online Data Data storage is often a real headache for businesses. Additionally, the shift to the cloud in response to storage challenges has caused security teams to struggle to reorient, leaving 49 percent of organizations doubting their experts’ ability to adapt. Even so, decision makers should not put off moving from old legacy systems to…

How To Humanize Your Data (And Why You Need To)

How To Humanize Your Data (And Why You Need To)

How To Humanize Your Data The modern enterprise is digital. It relies on accurate and timely data to support the information and process needs of its workforce and its customers. However, data suffers from a likability crisis. It’s as essential to us as oxygen, but because we don’t see it, we take it for granted.…

Micro-segmentation – Protecting Advanced Threats Within The Perimeter

Micro-segmentation – Protecting Advanced Threats Within The Perimeter

Micro-segmentation Changing with the times is frequently overlooked when it comes to data center security. The technology powering today’s networks has become increasingly dynamic, but most data center admins still employ archaic security measures to protect their network. These traditional security methods just don’t stand a chance against today’s sophisticated attacks. That hasn’t stopped organizations…

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

How to Identify and Authenticate in the Expanding IoT Ecosystem It is a necessity to protect IoT devices and their associated data. As the IoT ecosystem continues to expand, the need to create an identity to newly-connected things is becoming increasingly crucial. These ‘things’ can include anything from basic sensors and gateways to industrial controls…

Why Security Practitioners Need To Apply The 80-20 Rules To Data Security

Why Security Practitioners Need To Apply The 80-20 Rules To Data Security

The 80-20 Rule For Security Practitioners  Everyday we learn about yet another egregious data security breach, exposure of customer data or misuse of data. It begs the question why in this 21st century, as a security industry we cannot seem to secure our most valuable data assets when technology has surpassed our expectations in other regards.…

Which Is Better For Your Company: Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment?

Which Is Better For Your Company: Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment?

Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment? You know how enterprise resource management (ERP) can improve processes within your supply chain, and the things to keep in mind when implementing an ERP system. But do you know if cloud-based or on-premise ERP deployment is better for your company or industry? While cloud computing is becoming more and…


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