Category Archives: White Papers

Hybrid Cloud: The Influential Factor Of Flexibility

Hybrid Cloud: The Influential Factor Of Flexibility

Hybrid Cloud: The Influential Factor Of Flexibility

You might have seen many articles on private cloud or a public cloud, but a cloud strategy is not limited to this only. The answer may be in an intermediate range, the Hybrid Cloud.

First of all, let’s see how these services are deployed.hybrid-cloud

Private cloud – internalized or externalized: A private cloud is a cloud infrastructure operated directly and exclusively by an organization. The best known example is that of a cloud that runs on an internal IT company. Obviously, this infrastructure can be internalized. Under these conditions it is operated by the IT teams. Or it can be outsourced to a hosting company, specialized in cloud services.

In both cases, the infrastructure can be physically being in the company (on-premise), or outside the premise, and then we say that it is hosed. But in both cases, only the organization operates and supports the load.

A private cloud is primarily a natural movement of the company. The infrastructure that has funded by deployed, maintained, energized, powered, and updated applications on the regular basis usually provide the first support for cloud projects consumed by the enterprise and its ecosystem.

Services deployed in the cloud are therefore based on an infrastructure in internal control. And it is reassuring for CIOs shows the use of equipment purchased in time. It can better justify spending equipment and keep their hands on the edge of the information system and all that is within the boundary.

In many companies, business applications cannot be conceived outside of the physical infrastructure of the company. In some cases, this is a safety issue. For example, Bank data, Health Care, Defense, etc. In other cases, it is a question of attitude.

In all cases, the private cloud is an economical choice. The information from here in the case of system investments and the company fully supports funding.

Public cloud infrastructure:

A public cloud is based on open and shared public infrastructure. All users connect to the same infrastructure to access the same services that are rented. All users coexist within this infrastructure: developers to ensure data isolation of each other. If there are several levels of membership to a public cloud, we consider two:

Public infrastructure: the company occupies and rent a place in the infrastructure of the hosting company for the service in the cloud. It makes available virtualized resources – servers with their operating systems, storage with databases, and network to communicate – it consumes resources according to the needs. These resources are virtualized, that is to say are running in virtual machines (VM). Hundreds of virtual machines running on a physical machine, so many companies or individuals may be present on the same machine, called open architecture. The advantage for the company is that by sharing the same infrastructure with other companies cut the cost. And management, such as maintenance of the infrastructure is provided by the hosting company.

The multitenant: users participate and praise the same service, whatever the resources, infrastructure, management of servers, and storage, which is an application that is available with the storage of data. The user pays for a service, often with a clause volume changed the price down as well as up depending on the number of users and the use of storage space or data exchanged and processed. The service will be displayed on the workstation, usually in a browser internet. Some of these services ‘public cloud’ is already used by many organizations, such as messaging offered by the search engines or e-commerce websites, or CRM solutions – managing the customer relationship, even some payroll system programs.

The advantage for the company is to first be able to have multiple services without having to invest in infrastructure and licenses, and rapidly deployable since it is adequate to connect and declare it to start operations.

Another advantage is that you can always use the latest version of the solution, without the need to provide updates. Deployment is flexible and related to the only operating expenses. Finally, the solution to the public cloud is also interesting; mobility users can have the same tools as they connect.

Hybrid Cloud: the principle of flexibility

We have almost seen every version of cloud displays its advantages and disadvantages. The choice of one or the other is often dictated by necessity or by company policy. For example, the private cloud can keep the control of its information system, while the public cloud offers greater flexibility in the deployment of shared services.

When a company enforces a strict and restrictive discipline, it focuses on the infrastructure it owns, obviously oversized to be able to withstand peak loads, but under its full control. Conversely, it can select more flexibility, but lose that sense of security by using the cloud, sometimes at the risk of getting lost. Cloudiness prevailing on certain clauses of reversibility demonstrated.

However, there is an intermediate position which may enable the company to benefit from the best of both worlds: the hybrid cloud. This is a composition of two clouds, and the company can take advantage of two deployment models of cloud services.

The hybrid cloud considered for its flexibility. Some examples: components and strategic and highly secure applications of information systems can be deployed internally in a private cloud, components and operation applications, accessories, services and architectures for development and testing can appeal to public cloud services.

These may also cover temporary needs or meet the objectives of proximity access, for example, based on hosting company that has a network of data centers in the world, which can improve the availability of service and reduce latency.

Building hybrid cloud architecture can go further with what we call the ‘cloud bursting’. The system displays information using two levels; the average level is the most common since it covers 80 to 90% (or more) of the consumption of material resources, and come to peak loads, in those rare moments the year when excess needs (e.g. Balances and year-end holidays in the trade) cause additional load to which the SI (Sustainable Infrastructure) must meet.

The architecture ‘on premise’ must accept these peaks, so all SI is oversized compared to the real needs of the company means. The ‘cloud bursting’  is to see the peaks of consumption of infrastructure resources in the cloud. ISD (Infrastructure Services Division) can resize and its information as accurately as not invest in ‘capex’ (Capital expenditures) – and private cloud. Its permanent needs a replay in ‘opex’ (operating expense) needs at the margin.

That is why the hybrid cloud architectures should quickly establish itself to companies who are in search of the security of an internalized SI and flexibility of an IaaS in the cloud. The process is even more important that we go through a period of technological revolution, both the evolution of equipment and tools, especially the Virtualization infrastructure, and changes in use, especially consumerization in IT and mobility.

By Paul Lopez,

Paul Lopez, a technology writer and sales & marketing executive at bodHOST.com, a cloud & dedicated server hosting company based in New Jersey.

The Importance Of Monitoring Your IT Ecosystem

The Importance of Monitoring Your IT Ecosystem

If you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it.

                                                                     – Lord Kelvin (1824-1907), British physicist and engineer.

Lord Kelvin, father of the absolute temperature scale now named after him, got it right more than a hundred years ago. Measurement is critical to improvement, whether it be a product or process. Even the management doctrine of “What cannot be measured cannot be managed” has its origins in Kelvin’s pronouncement.

Monitoring is a step up from mere measurement. In simple words, monitoring may be described as measurement of parameters and then comparing them against pre-established standards to determine variances, and whether those variances fall within or outside acceptable thresholds.

Today’s information-driven organizations face the fundamental challenge of balancing high availability of business-critical information with maintaining its integrity and security. They must do this in spite of an increasingly complex IT environment that often includes traditional physical infrastructure, virtualized infrastructure and cloud computing.

To put things into perspective, Gartner predicts information storage to grow from 40% to 60% annually, while new variants of malware, such as polymorphic attacks that evade anti-virus software and intrusion vectors like web attack toolkits, grow exponentially. However, older standards fall short of recognizing such threats.

This is where the SANS 20 Critical Security Controls (20CSC) come in. As this paper clearly demonstrates, the 20CSC represent “a prioritized baseline of information security and measures and controls.” This white paper has impeccable origins. John Gilligan, former CIO of the U.S. Air Force and the US Department of Energy, led the development of this document; it represents a consensus of government and nongovernment experts.

This paper is not merely a recitation of standards; it presents a comprehensive comparison of 20CSC with the ten-year-old Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) that has been the gold standard till now. Moreover, it also lays down guidelines for implementation at minimal cost. Download to get free access to this authoritative document.

It’s not enough to know what to compare yourself to; you must have the right monitoring tool in hand. That being said, I’m happy to offer you free and exclusive access to Netwrix Auditor. This tool monitors your IT infrastructure in its entirety, because even the smallest IT modifications can have serious repercussions. That’s why the product actively assesses your most critical systems 24×7, detecting, capturing and consolidating must-have IT infrastructure audit data to support configuration auditing and answer important questions like:

  • Who changed what, when and where?

  • What are current and past configurations?

Click on the link to know more.

By Sourya Biswas

7 Steps To Developing A Cloud Security Plan

7 Steps To Developing A Cloud Security Plan

7 Steps to Developing a Cloud Security Plan

Designing and implementing an enterprise security plan can be a daunting task for any business. To help facilitate this endeavor NaviSite has developed a manageable process and checklist that can be used by enterprise security, compliance, and IT professionals as a framework for crafting a successful cloud computing security plan. It defines seven steps—sequentially—that have been tested and refined through NaviSite’s experiences helping hundreds of companies secure enterprise resources according to best practices. This plan enables organizations to gain the economic advantages of secure and compliant managed cloud services.

Step 1: REVIEW YOUR BUSINESS GOALS

It is important that any cloud security plan begins with the basic understanding of your specific business goals. Security is not a one-size-fits-all scenario and should focus on enabling:

  • TECHNOLOGIES: Authentication and authorization, managing and monitoring, and reporting and auditing technologies should be leveraged to protect, monitor, and report on access to information resources
  • PROCESSES: Methodologies should be established that define clear processes for everything from provisioning and account establishment through incident management, problem management, change control, and cceptable use policies so that processes govern access to information
  • PEOPLE: Organizations need access to the proper skill sets and expertise to develop security plans that align with business goals

Too often, organizations view internal security and compliance teams as inhibitors to advancing the goals of the business. Understanding the business objectives and providing long-term strategies to enable business growth, customer acquisition, and customer retention is essential to any successful security plan.

The best way to do this is to develop cloud security policies based on cross departmental input. A successful security program includes contribution from all stakeholders to ensure that policies are aligned and procedures are practical and pragmatic.

The broader the input the more likely the final security plan will truly align with, and support corporate goals. Executive input is not only essential to ensure that assets are protected with the proper safeguards, but also to ensure that all parties understand the strategic goals. For example, if a company plans to double in size within a few years, security infrastructure needs to be designed to support scalability.

CASE IN POINT: At NaviSite, we often see customers faced with the challenge of making major security and technology changes to address evolving corporate goals. For example, a customer that hosts multiple merchant sites had a Payment Card Industry (PCI)-compliant application, but when it was acquired, its parent company required stricter controls that conformed to the enterprise-wide PCI program. The acquired company came to us with a small company perspective, while the new parent company wanted to enforce even tighter security across its divisions.

We worked with them to realign and bolster the goals of the acquired company’s security and compliance programs with the corporate goals of the parent company. By reviewing the business goals with the stakeholders from the parent company, the newly acquired company, and our security team, we were able to identify and document the objectives for the new compliance program and ensure that they were aligned with the over-arching
PCI program.

Some Reasons Behind Cloud Security Vulnerabilities

Some Reasons Behind Cloud Security Vulnerabilities

Some Reasons Behind Cloud Security Vulnerabilities

We have debated back and forth that the Cloud is just as safe as the traditional enterprise option, and even more so. Combined with all the advantages, it is a better option for today’s business world. But the security fears are always just around the corner and pops up again every time there is a discussion about Cloud migration. These fears are not unfounded however; they are very real but quite containable unless they were not considered during migration to the Cloud.

Organizations looking into Cloud security like HP have found very simple and obvious yet often overlooked reasons for the security vulnerabilities that happen when applications and data are migrated to the Cloud. Most of the vulnerabilities are caused by overlooked and unchanged settings when applications and data have been migrated. Here are a few of them.

1) Unchanged hardcoded communication channels

Most enterprises have data policies that have been enforced in their data centers and have been considered as fairly secure. Settings like encrypted or unencrypted data channels, harcoded IP addresses and hardcoded hostnames. These are all fine internally because the data center environment has been evaluated for security and these settings were made for exactly that. But when the data is moved to the Cloud, all the channels become public so internally secure processes like passing plain text content over the network suddenly becomes a huge vulnerability. That is why all migrated programs and applications should conduct all the previously safe intra-component communication over secured and encrypted channels. All of these settings have to be changed to accommodate the change in the control of the network infrastructure.

2) Unsecured logging system

InfoSec

Logs are very important for the enterprise. It allows administrators to diagnose problems and as a forensic tool to find evidence in the event of an attack. Enterprises often have strict rules which govern their logging system and dictates what exactly can be logged and who are privy to this sort of information. These rules are strictly policed and enforced regularly. But when the system is migrated, these rules do not apply anymore. And to avoid repercussions and accusations later on, these rules must be reviewed and reapplied to the Cloud environment through the SLA with the Cloud vendor. This ensures that data logging cannot accidentally leak towards malicious individuals. Attackers can use the log data to determine the vulnerabilities of the system; it is very rich and for hackers. The logging should be minimized, reconfigured and controlled, or even turned off.

3) Adjusting encryption for virtualization

Mirroring of an entire system is a very common practice when provisioning virtual environments. This means that a specific vulnerability with the parent system will ensure that all virtual mirrors will have that same vulnerability, giving an attacker hundreds of doors which can be opened by a single key. Virtual instances must have different encryption keys, so they should never be hardcoded. Hardcoding in an internal data center environment might be fine, but that should be changed when the system goes Cloud.

All of these vulnerabilities are because of the difference in the environment that the system will be residing in. Most of the time migration is so painless because systems work immediately without much tweaking that these very important security liabilities which were not issues before have been ignored and carried over in the public environment. The only solution is a reevaluation of the system’s security after migration and changing all of these variables.

By Abdul Salam

Understanding Technical Debt: Cutting Corners That Can Cost You Later

Understanding Technical Debt: Cutting Corners That Can Cost You Later

Understanding Technical Debt: Cutting Corners That Can Cost You Later

Cloud technologies are known to offer many benefits, but it’s safe to say that two words dominate expectations when it comes to development cycles: faster and nimbler. As more organizations implement agile development, it’s becoming clear that expedited time to market is an expected standard – and so is the speedy development that goes along with it.

As fast turnarounds and flexible production become a baseline of cloud development, so does the necessity for developers to fix, tweak, change and adapt as they go. On a sprint, it’s tempting to prioritize speed over completion, especially when a deadline for an impatient client is drawing closer. As a result, some developers are tempted to rush and cut corners in an effort to meet the delivery deadlines. Because of this, many in our field are becoming familiar with the term “technical debt.”

The danger, of course, is that even though those shortcuts can seem like an efficient way to achieve speed to market, they can damage teams in other ways. For instance, last year when LinkedIn suffered a hack and millions of email addresses were stolen, the company was harshly accused of cutting corners, which led to the vulnerability. Whether they did or did not is still debatable, however the cost to the brand and revenue were apparent from the mere idea that the company scrimped when it came to coding.

Every organization that’s using agile should be well aware that sometimes cutting corners can turn into technical debt that will cost your organization later – and can ultimately cause deadlines to be missed, sabotaging the same cycle time you were trying to protect.

Managing technical debt

Many developers make the mistake of thinking they know what corners they can cut without sacrificing quality. But as development evolves and uncompleted changes and abandoned directions pile up, the team can find themselves staring at a serious technical debt that must be paid.

The causes of debt are fairly common. The pressure to release a product prematurely, a lack of collaboration and knowledge-sharing, or a lack of thoughtful testing or code review and key documentation, are just a few dynamics that can lead to a significant amount of debt. So how do you keep this from happening to your team?

One tip to keep in mind is resolving issues as soon as they appear instead of putting them on a back burner. The earlier the stage of detection, the less expensive those issues will be to fix. Issues left unresolved, on the other hand, will expand into a technical debt that will eventually demand more time and money in eliminating. As one example, consider legacy code where the software engineers spend so much effort in keeping the system running, thereby supporting the debt that there’s not enough time to add new features to the product without additional expense.

cut-costs-cloud

Common shortcuts – and their costs

When work cycles are on the line, developers tend to cut some of the same corners over and over. A good example is Quality Assurance work, such as code reviews, unit testing, integration tests and system tests. Many developers feel comfortable skipping tasks here for one simple reason. Because this is work undertaken to validate the code, rather than actually writing the code (other than corrections found by the QA activities), they assume it can be eliminated with minimal risk.

The truth is that cutting corners here can mean sacrificing knowledge and productivity. While it might not be immediately apparent, the overall productivity of the team tends to be higher during a lot of these activities since they increase interactive learning within the team, which in turn leads to higher levels of output.

One way to protect this valuable phase is to implement processes that are used as a check list among every development cycle. In my company, we call this Tiempo Quality System (TQS), a defined set of best practices and processes that standardizes the engineering process. By using a configurator that ensures best practice QA activities are defined up front, TQS minimizes overhead while maximizing overall team productivity. Similar systems can easily be implemented among any development team and are a great way to eliminate technical debt.

Managing quick cycles without cutting corners

All of this might sound as if agile developers need to choose between delivering on fast-paced cycles or executing on solid development. Rest assured, both are possible.

One solution is tracking velocity to produce data that shows the production delays resulting from a backlog of coding issues. By demonstrating the exact fault lines that jeopardize product quality, developers can head off debt at the start. Things like Code Reviews should be looked at not merely as QA activities, but as opportunities for the team to learn together, create improvements on producing the code and work towards optimization.

The shortcuts worth taking

Developers must accept that the pressure to cut corners will never go away. So is it taking a shortcut ever acceptable? Under some circumstances, yes. One category that qualifies would be issues that aren’t showstoppers when working on release or deadline driven products. In this situation, rather than delaying time to market, refactoring can and should be implemented after meeting the deadline.

Predictable release schedules, deadline adherence, and expedited development cycles are good things and should always be prioritized in intelligent cloud development. At the same time, it’s critical to adopt a long view and not sacrifice quality in the pursuit of speed. Manage your technical debt during development and you’ll find it that much easier to deliver a high-performing product – on deadline.

By Bruce Steele

Bruce Steele is the COO of Tiempo Development. He drives Tiempo’s software engineering, professional services, consulting and customer support initiatives. Mr. Steele is a seasoned executive with over 25 years of management experience in the areas of operations, corporate development, sales and strategic planning with leading technology firms. He can be reached at bsteele@tiempodevelopment.com.

Big Data Tweaks For Small Businesses Success

Big Data Tweaks For Small Businesses Success

Big Data Tweaks

The ever expanding internet data coupled with social and mobile infrastructure expansion has made big data tweaks and analytics a buzz term, especially looking at the fact that ninety percent of the world’s internet data is created in the last couple of years. However Big Data is the name of a problem, not a solution. The solution is the advanced algorithms running on large platforms crunching data and numbers to generate useful information.

big data tweaks

It could be termed as data recycling to obtain packets of information from a dense knowledge and data clouds. Naturally, most solutions involving big data are based on huge processing clusters to handle the load of processing bulk information making it prohibitive for small and medium level business which cannot cope with the barrier of entry investment. In the last few years, large enterprises have invested their resources to generate analytics and harvested tremendous gains in business by streamlining marketing and streamlining products to user needs. However cloud computing platforms have opened this market for small and medium sized business that can now leverage the available processing power of the cloud to dive into the immense analytics market. There are numerous lucrative opportunities in commercial transaction systems, website traffic monitoring and social media analytics besides others that are waiting to be explored.

Most experts have learned over time that taking scratch notes or relying on excel sheets alone will not make them competitive. They have to take advantage of systematic skills in data management with advanced technologies which can process large amounts of data and make sense from it. The pay as you go model in cloud platforms is ideal for small companies that can pay little, especially in terms of infrastructure and human resource overheads. The time savings and quick testing also makes sense for companies that wish to touch the base before diving full throttle. Hence the availability of cloud resources is opening new venues of business expansion for small companies that can quickly take up a specialized analytics opportunity to improve internal business or provide reporting to other enterprises. At the same time, small companies can take advantage from new cloud-computing based tools that are already leveraging new techniques to mine analytics and generate trend reports. These tools can capture behavior and impressions of prospective and previous customers to produce predictive models and forecast future actions. By spending small sums on these reports, some time just a few hundred dollars, a small company can get a grasp of user needs or information and technology flow. However, the overwhelming information can be a pitfall for small companies that may collect more than they need. Hence it is crucial to decide on the factors that value your business the most as well as concentrating on fewer but complete tools to achieve better accuracy and convergence.

By Salam UI Haq

IT Disaster Recovery For SMEs

IT Disaster Recovery For SMEs

IT Disaster Recovery For SMEs

According to credible estimates, an hour of outage may cost a medium sized company $70,000. Yes, that is accumulated losses when IT systems go offline. What’s interesting to note here is that in contrast to the popular belief that natural disasters constitute the primary reason for IT system failure, a recent study finds hardware failure to be the leading cause, by a big margin, of IT disasters and the losses, both financial and loss in credibility, which small and medium sized businesses have to incur. However, if SMEs take the right precautions, much of the loss can be quickly remedied, even if it occurs.

I do not need to argue about the importance of prompt recovery from IT disasters. Even if your business can burn through $70,000/hour of losses, the loss in customer confidence, especially for consumer facing enterprises may not be repaired, ever. A study by HP and Score also reveals that 1/4th of medium sized businesses go broke as a result of a major disaster. It shows the ROI for investing your time and money in contingency planning and executing dry runs to ensure your plan works.

image-graph

Among the four major types of disasters – Hardware failure, natural disasters, human error and software failure, only natural disasters are something which are not in human control, everything else, including human error can be tamed, if not controlled. The key however is to be prepared for extreme situations and make your plans based on disaster predictive studies available out there.

Unless your organization is unique, it’s very much likely that you have one SAN (Storage Area Network) or NAS (Network Attached Storage) which is being utilized across your organization. In order to keep storage simple and scalable, organizations tend to neglect the doomsday scenario which may trigger due to a slight failure of their SAN. On top of it, all data, including virtualized storage relies on this one big SAN. Now imagine this SAN failing for any reason – there are plenty. Since the whole IT environment is connected to the SAN, the whole IT infrastructure comes to a halt, all because of SAN failure. This is not a hypothetical scenario which I’m creating to drive my point home, rather, it’s one of the major causes of hardware failures which result in IT disasters. Let’s look at some of the measures organizations may take to mitigate risks. First comes redundancy but even with layers of redundancy, if your SAN is not diversified (separate systems and not one big unit), there are good chances those added layers of redundant storage will fall like a house of cards when disaster strikes. Next comes ensuring a standard data backup policy is made and followed to the letter and spirit. However, surveys suggest that it normally take tens of hours to recovery from SAN failure with tape and disk backups. Some studies draw an even starker picture by claiming that tape backups often fail.

Cloud backup seems to be an emerging trend, primarily driven by the idea to ‘physically’ diversify your storage network. Organizations which deeply embrace Cloud completely let go of any internal SAN and rely on the Cloud. This may not be a wise move considering that Cloud may also fail (remember the Amazon EC2 failure which brought down mega internet services like Reddit etc?). Using Cloud backup is a credible plan to recover from any storage related IT failures. Diversifying your Cloud backup pool only further strengthens your IT and mitigates failure risks.

No matter how strong your IT systems are, they’re prone to failure. This may happen because of your system administrator accidentally wiping out server file system or a hurricane sweeping through your data center. Preparation is the key.   Read The Full Quorum: Disaster Recovery Report 2013

By Salman Ul Haq

7 Essentials Of Hybrid Cloud Backup

7 Essentials Of Hybrid Cloud Backup

7 Essentials of Hybrid Cloud Backup

Understanding the Cloud Options

A hybrid cloud solution combines private (internal/on-premise) and public (external) cloud deployment models.

With a typical private cloud solution, one would build, develop and manage their own cloud infrastructure. The most common deployments of private cloud solutions are in enterprise-level environments. Businesses that have the capital to fund a private cloud operation will usually purchase the necessary equipment, hire their own dedicated IT support teams, and build or lease their own data centers. This allows the company to have complete control over their cloud environment. The primary downside of a private cloud is that it is very expensive to implement and maintain. It also requires highly skilled engineers to manage the network.

In a public cloud scenario, one utilizes web-based applications and services. Hardware or software is not owned or maintained by the client, and resources are completely acquired from third party
vendors. Google Apps, Salesforce, and Amazon Web services are all common examples of public clouds. With these deployments, end-users will work strictly through the Internet via web-based portals. Generally, application data is not stored locally. All relevant information is stored through the cloud provider.

While these solutions are cost-effective, the lack of control of data center resources, monthly fees, and increased support costs can hinder the viability that a public cloud will align with every business. The fact that business critical data is stored only offsite can also be disconcerting for businesses. One must also consider the possibility that the cloud provider could go out of business, experience a service outage, be acquired by another company, or suffer a security breach. Any of these scenarios could spell disaster for a business’ data.cloud

With a hybrid cloud model, aspects of both platforms are merged to form a single, unified platform. A business owns some form of local hardware, which is integrated with resources owned by a third party. Depending on what attributes of the business are being pushed to the cloud, there are many options for how a hybrid cloud platform can be constructed.

What is Hybrid Cloud Backup?

In the context of data backup, a combination of private and public backup solutions can be used to form an efficient and robust platform. Hybrid cloud vendors use their expertise to engineer enterprise-grade backup solutions that can be affordable for businesses of any size.

On the private cloud side, an end-user would have a local device that acts as a NAS (Network-Attached Storage) unit backing up data locally, while concurrently pushing data off-site to a secure, third party cloud. What sets these units apart from a typical NAS unit is that they also apply complex data deduplication, compression, file conversion, and other processes which are unique to each vendor. These processes help reduce storage space on local devices and off-site servers, keep local bandwidth reduction at a minimum, and optimize the backup process to make data recovery as efficient and quick as possible, both locally and in the cloud.

The public cloud side is comprised of the data center infrastructure developed by the cloud provider. Mirrored backup images from local backup devices are stored and archived in proprietary data centers, so they can be accessed in the event that backup records are not available locally (i.e. a disaster scenario).

Having the cloud infrastructure developed by a third party is valuable to end-users because through economies of scale, backup cloud vendors can provide space in the cloud at lower costs per GB than the average MSP could provide if they built their own cloud. This enables IT service providers and their clients to leverage cloud storage, without having to pay high monthly fees. Also, by utilizing third party technology, end-users and MSPs need not worry about maintenance of the cloud; that liability lies entirely with the vendor.

All in all, the hybrid cloud backup platform encapsulates the best of the private and public models to form a feature rich, highly efficient, and affordable system.

Hybrid Cloud Backup

1. Business Continuity

A desired benefit of most hybrid cloud backup solutions is the ability to achieve business continuity. Business continuity is a proactive way of looking at disaster preparedness. By having the proper tools and procedures in place, businesses can be assured that they will remain functional during a disaster scenario, large or small.

Business continuity, in the context of data backup, means that in the event of a disaster, cyber-attack, human error, etc., a business will never lose access to their critical data and applications. In the data backup industry, the lack of access to business critical data is referred to as downtime. Business continuity is critical to any business, because downtime can potentially bring operations to a halt while IT issues are being repaired. This can be extremely costly for any SMB to endure….

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Why Small Businesses Need A Business Intelligence Dashboard

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The Cloud Above Our Home

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Cloud Security Risks: The Top 8 According To ENISA

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Cloud Computing and Finland Green Technology

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Green Technology Finland Last week we touched upon how a project in Finland had blended two of the world’s most important industries, cloud computing and green technology, to produce a data centre that used nearby sea water to both cool their servers and heat local homes.  Despite such positive environmental projects, there is little doubt that…

Low Cost Cloud Computing Gives Rise To Startups

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The Internet of Things Lifts Off To The Cloud

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Business Analytics Vs Data Science

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Utilizing Digital Marketing Techniques Via The Cloud

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Consequences Of Combining Off Premise Cloud Storage and Corporate Data

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The Future Of Cybersecurity

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Digital Twin And The End Of The Dreaded Product Recall

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The Digital Twin  How smart factories and connected assets in the emerging Industrial IoT era along with the automation of machine learning and advancement of artificial intelligence can dramatically change the manufacturing process and put an end to the dreaded product recalls in the future. In recent news, Samsung Electronics Co. has initiated a global…

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Once upon a time, only a select few companies like Google and Salesforce possessed the knowledge and expertise to operate efficient cloud infrastructure and applications. Organizations patronizing those companies benefitted with apps that offered new benefits in flexibility, scalability and cost effectiveness. These days, the sharp division between cloud and on-premises infrastructure…

Cloud Security Risks: The Top 8 According To ENISA

Cloud Security Risks: The Top 8 According To ENISA

Cloud Security Risks Does cloud security risks ever bother you? It would be weird if it didn’t. Cloud computing has a lot of benefits, but also a lot of risks if done in the wrong way. So what are the most important risks? The European Network Information Security Agency did extensive research on that, and…

Virtual Immersion And The Extension/Expansion Of Virtual Reality

Virtual Immersion And The Extension/Expansion Of Virtual Reality

Virtual Immersion And Virtual Reality This is a term I created (Virtual Immersion). Ah…the sweet smell of Virtual Immersion Success! Virtual Immersion© (VI) an extension/expansion of Virtual Reality to include the senses beyond visual and auditory. Years ago there was a television commercial for a bathing product called Calgon. The tagline of the commercial was Calgon…

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority Research has revealed that third parties cause 63 percent of all data breaches. From HVAC contractors, to IT consultants, to supply chain analysts and beyond, the threats posed by third parties are real and growing. Deloitte, in its Global Survey 2016 of third party risk, reported…

5% Of Companies Have Embraced The Digital Innovation Fostered By Cloud Computing

5% Of Companies Have Embraced The Digital Innovation Fostered By Cloud Computing

Embracing The Cloud We love the stories of big complacent industry leaders having their positions sledge hammered by nimble cloud-based competitors. Saleforce.com chews up Oracle’s CRM business. Airbnb has a bigger market cap than Marriott. Amazon crushes Walmart (and pretty much every other retailer). We say: “How could they have not seen this coming?” But, more…

Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

The True Meaning of Availability What is real availability? In our line of work, cloud service providers approach availability from the inside out. And in many cases, some never make it past their own front door given how challenging it is to keep the lights on at home let alone factors that are out of…

The Importance of Cloud Backups: Guarding Your Data Against Hackers

The Importance of Cloud Backups: Guarding Your Data Against Hackers

The Importance of Cloud Backups Cloud platforms have become a necessary part of modern business with the benefits far outweighing the risks. However, the risks are real and account for billions of dollars in losses across the globe per year. If you’ve been hacked, you’re not alone. Here are some other companies in the past…

Don’t Be Intimidated By Data Governance

Don’t Be Intimidated By Data Governance

Data Governance Data governance, the understanding of the raw data of an organization is an area IT departments have historically viewed as a lose-lose proposition. Not doing anything means organizations run the risk of data loss, data breaches and data anarchy – no control, no oversight – the Wild West with IT is just hoping…