Category Archives: White Papers

The Cloud: Reinventing Enterprise Collaboration

IDG survey points to need for collaboration across all business units and an end to spot solutions

It is no surprise to anyone working in virtually any business anywhere in the world today, that knowledge is power. Having access to the most accurate, up-to-date corporate information, and the ability to easily collaborate on that information gives organizations the means to make decisions that drive the most positive business outcomes.

Collaboration and content sharing are not, of course, new concepts. But cloud computing has changed the nature of collaboration, content sharing, document storage and project management to enable more efficient, faster-acting and cost-effective enterprises.

According to a new study by IDG Research, which surveyed more than 260 large-enterprise IT IT managers, the vast majority of knowledge workers (86 percent) placed a very high level of importance on collaborating with internal coworkers and external stakeholders, and having access to the most up-to-date corporate information.

This kind of collaboration happens only when information can be easily accessed internally and externally, regardless of where users are, what networks they are on or what devices they are using. Cloud-based delivery models enable massively scalable document storage, collaboration and project management solutions for large enterprises.

It’s Easier in the Cloud

Cloud-based content storage and management is simple to use. After uploading files to a centralized storage server in the cloud, users can access, manage, share and view all of their files (regardless of media type) on the Web. But it’s more than large-scale file storage. Cloud-based content management enables Web-based project management, including task creation and assignment, discussion areas, a unified repository for comments, and links to project-related Web sites.

The benefits of collaboration are many, and include increased productivity, better informed decision-making, better alignment between teams and upper management, increased innovation and competitiveness, and
better visibility into ongoing projects.

Organizations that have made the transition to new cloud-based models have realized massive productivity gains.

CUNY Hunter College is a case in point. Researchers at Hunter College found themselves emailing files back and forth with external researchers in an attempt to coordinate efforts. External partners had a hard time accessing the files, which hindered progress on the team’s group work.

So the college began uploading materials to the cloud, creating new folders to post meeting minutes, agendas, documents and timelines for future progress. In short, the service acts as a Web-based workspace, offering a seamless way to centralize content into an easily accessible repository.

You can’t collaborate if you can’t share files,” said John O’Neill, professor of counselor education at CUNY. “You can’t collaborate if you can’t centralize your materials somewhere and access them when you’re not together as a group.”

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Controlled Explosion: Big Data and The Cloud

Controlled Explosion: Big Data and The Cloud

You can’t stop the massive growth in data, but you can do a better job of managing it

IT departments are beginning to shift their focus from adding more storage to improving the efficiency of the storage systems already in place. Today, the name of the game is improving productivity and efficiency.

Storing and managing a large – and ever-increasing – amount of data presents a formidable business challenge. “Data volume is growing faster than IT budgets and faster than technology is evolving to solve the problem,” says Sanjeet Singh, a product marketing manager at Dell. Midsized companies are particularly challenged, because they typically lack the resources (both money and manpower) to handle the deluge.

Three Pillars of Data Management Efficiency

With infrastructure budgets under constant pressure, IT departments are beginning to shift their focus from adding more storage to improving the efficiency of the storage systems already in place. Today, the name of the game is improving productivity and efficiency while eliminating waste.

Indeed, many analysts predict strong growth for technologies that help midsized companies increase efficiency and get greater business value from their data storage investments. Some technology providers have zeroed in on three pillars of efficiency that bring almost immediate relief from the cost, complexity and administration of data management:

1. Consolidation

Server-attached storage has limited space for disk drives, which means when IT departments need more storage, they’re forced to purchase another server. This yields isolated storage “islands” that are difficult and costly to manage because  the systems must be updated and maintained individually. “Companies throw servers into their environment not because they need more horsepower but because they need more storage,” says Steve Arrington, product marketing strategist at Dell. “Then they have to hire more people to manage all this stuff.”

Consolidating resources in a virtualized storage area network, or SAN, allows companies to break free from the constraints of server-attached storage. It separates data management from servers, which allows IT to speed up operations like backup, retrieval and archiving because the tasks don’t compete for system resources. A SAN can be used to mirror information at remote locations, ensuring quick recovery in the event of an outage. And the prices of SAN-based technologies such as iSCSI have dropped, making them more viable options for financially constrained midsized companies.

Storage resources can also be consolidated in a network-attached storage (NAS) environment. IT departments should consider cost, distance between offices, and number of users when choosing between a SAN or NAS.

When storage resources are consolidated into a single pool, IT managers can store more data on fewer drives, which use less power and require less physical space.

The benefits over direct-attached storage are clear:

  • lower cost per megabyte of stored data
  • no single point of failure
  • centralized data means less administration
  • greater disk utilization
  • network-wide storage management
  • scalability; can add capacity without taking system offline
  • supports many operating systems

2 . Deduplication

Data duplication (unnecessarily storing multiple copies of the same data) is a big drain on storage resources. It wastes capacity, creates longer backup windows, slows down retrieval and generates more management overhead. According to one data management consultant, duplication rates of up to 30 percent are not uncommon among companies with no formal master data management plan. (And what midsized company has one of those?)…

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Research Report:The Best Way to Build a Cloud

Research Report:The Best Way to Build a Cloud

The Best Way to Build a Cloud

In most companies, the needs of the business are outpacing what IT can deliver.

Technology is the foundation and enabler of business innovation, the foundation and enabler of business innovation, but developing and implementing new solutions is resource-intensive. Integrating and optimizing islands of IT is complex, time-consuming and costly.

Now, with the advent of cloud-based infrastructure and business process, IT is both a builder and a broker, simultaneously needing to build internal private clouds, consume services from the public cloud, and manage all of these services. Virtually every company is interested in transforming its infrastructure and applications to take advantage of the cloud and a more flexible, efficient IT infrastructure.

In order to boost efficiency in an increasingly shared, converged or cloud environment, the roles and responsibilities of server and storage administrators must be clearly understood and coordinated. Server administrators manage and deploy the server infrastructure and the applications that run on them, whereas storage administrators maintain the overall health of storage and manage the consumption and protection of data. Many solutions fail to take this into account: While both are IT administrators, their roles are different with few opportunities for interaction, and it is often difficult for them to collaborate on a joint task. It is important to pick a private cloud solution that addresses both roles.


When venturing into the cloud, many enterprises prefer to build private clouds first. Often, executives feel more comfortable deploying sensitive services and applications within environments and infrastructures they own, because they are likely to retain the most control. However, implementing a private cloud can be complex and daunting. HP’s solution, CloudSystem Matrix, helps you build a turnkey private cloud environment to deliver the benefits of the cloud to your business users.

This report sponsored by HP + Intel outlines a strategy for getting the benefits of the cloud quickly. Learn about the solutions that can help you save time, improve storage efficiency and maintain a secure, available environment.

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HP CloudSystem Matrix: Benefits of Private Cloud and Infrastructure as a Service Today

HP CloudSystem Matrix: Benefits of Private Cloud and Infrastructure as a Service Today

HP CloudSystem Matrix: Benefits of Private Cloud and Infrastructure as a Service Today

Get the freedom and flexibility to provision infrastructure and applications in minutes rather than months. HO Offer

If you are like most companies, you have been adding servers, storage, and networking devices to keep pace with your business demands. You could be spending upwards of 70 percent of your IT budget on operations and maintenance, which means you are spending 30 percent or less on innovation that is critical to growing your business. You don’t have to be captive to unmanageable IT sprawl. Solutions are available today to help you realign traditional technology silos into virtual pools shared by any application and flexible enough to change as business needs evolve. HP CloudSystem Matrix offers a self-service infrastructure portal for auto-provisioning and built-in lifecycle management to optimize infrastructure, monitor applications, and increase uptime for your cloud and traditional IT.

This solution brief will help you understand the benefits of the HP CloudSystem Matrix which provides a unified solution for physical and virtual environments that’s perfectly suited as an IT consolidation platform.

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Whitepaper: Start Small, Grow Tall: Why Cloud Now

Whitepaper: Start Small, Grow Tall: Why Cloud Now

The cloud is the hottest thing in computing today,and enterprises are eagerly seeking to adopt it. They realize that cloud computing holds the promise of curing today’s “data center sprawl,” with its colossal complexity, considerable costs,and substantial capital investment. For their part, service providers see the cloud as a catalyst for revenue growth. Executives and leaders look forward to the day when information technology will be delivered as a pure service throughout the organization, metered, ubiquitous, and available on demand much like electricity or water.

But the reality is that the cloud isn’t yet so mature or capable that it’s ready to replace traditional IT. Companies face a number of obstacles to cloud adoption. Among them: differences between business and IT executives about the pace of adoption; differing stages of maturity within the cloud adoption continuum; and the need to avoid compromising the cloud’s benefits with scattershot, uncoordinated adoption. As you’ll see, without a proper goal and a clear plan to get there, organizations risk re-infecting their IT environments with complexity and sprawl that are every bit as counterproductive as the data center problems the cloud was meant to correct.

The problems hidden in the cloud

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SAP Drives Openness and Choice for Virtualization and Cloud Computing

Preferred Three-Way Strategic Collaboration With EMC and VMware to Deliver 

Next-Generation Infrastructure With SAP® Services Offerings to Provide Upgrade Support for Customers

MADRID, Spain – November 09, 2011 – As cloud computing and virtualization rapidly evolve, SAP AG (NYSE: SAP) is working in a preferred three-way strategic collaboration with partners EMC (NYSE: EMC) and VMware to develop tools and services that make it easier for customers to adopt cloud and run SAP systems in next-generation cloud infrastructures with increasing levels of automation. The company is deepening its partnerships with EMC and VMware to deliver even more business agility and scale efficiencies by taking advantage of two key transformational technologies: cloud computing and in-memory technology. The announcement was made at SAPPHIRE® NOW + SAP® TechEd, being held as a co-located event in Madrid from November 8-10.

In Collaboration With SAP, EMC and VMware Accelerate the Journey to Cloud Computing
As a next step to extensive and ongoing innovation with partners to unleash the benefits of pervasive virtualization and cloud computing, SAP will work closely with EMC and VMware and is currently evaluating options to deliver an end-to-end stack optimized for running mission-critical SAP applications. Together, the three companies plan to invest and integrate best-of-breed application, database, virtualization, management and information infrastructure technologies, as well as deliver new services to support and accelerate customers’ journey to the cloud. Additionally, consulting services and global support offerings from SAP are planned to focus on helping customers accurately assess, design, implement and optimize a virtualization and cloud strategy, with minimal impact on the business.

As a part of this broader engagement, SAP and VMware expect to deliver an extended support program by integrating a configuration and health check for SAP systems running on VMware cloud infrastructure into SAP® GoingLive™ Check services and SAP EarlyWatch® Alert service. Customers should gain a better ability to monitor and manage their SAP systems running on the VMware platform.

SAP also intends to drive a radical improvement in the manageability of enterprise applications in private clouds by evaluating the delivery of VMware vSphere®-based virtual appliances, orchestrated by declarative models in the TOSCA language recently submitted to OASIS for standardization. SAP, VMware and EMC plan to collaborate to develop new automation and management tools that can interpret and execute the TOSCA models provided by SAP.

SAP and EMC will explore collaboration opportunities around the SAP HANA™ platform to deliver high-end system availability and EMC’s fully automated storage tiering technologies (FAST). This deep collaboration will further strengthen SAP in-memory computing technology to deliver actionable insight into business processes by providing scalability and availability for customers.

With virtualization now pervasive throughout the enterprise and baseline applications deployed, SAP customers are turning their attention to cloud computing strategies for mission-critical environments, ” said Pat Gelsinger, president and COO, Information Infrastructure Products, EMC. “EMC, SAP and VMware are working together to accelerate SAP customers’ journey to hybrid cloud computing. By integrating technologies and delivering new services we hope to both improve business agility and lower IT costs for our mutual customers.”

Customers are moving rapidly toward full virtualization, a critical step on the journey to the enterprise hybrid cloud,” said Paul Maritz, CEO of VMware. “Virtualizing mission-critical production databases and associated applications is a key part of this journey. With a full set of new product optimizations, professional services and joint customer support, we will be providing customers the assistance and confidence they need to virtualize their SAP landscapes — delivering faster time-to-value, lowering TCO and enabling the highest levels of service and availability to end users.”

Taking Management to the Next Level With Virtualization Services
Customer projects and transformation efforts are supported by the comprehensive consulting services portfolio from the SAP® Services organization. Services are now available to apply virtualization toward cloud-based models, covering the entire cycle – from conceptual blueprinting to migration, to the efficient and agile management of virtualized and cloud-based SAP environments. For landscapes virtualized with VMware vSphere, SAP Services currently evaluates options to provide a joint engagement model together with VMware to offer holistic support to customers. Customers may then also be able to benefit from a joint assessment service from SAP and VMware that will identify requirements and options to cost-effectively virtualize their SAP landscapes.

We are co-innovating with industry leaders in our vast ecosystem to deliver openness and choice to customers, making it much easier for them to adopt cloud technologies,” said Dr. Vishal Sikka, member of the SAP Executive Board, Technology & Innovation. “Market observers agree that SAP’s next-generation architecture is truly bringing the power of these disruptive innovations to our customers without disruption. Our work with EMC and VMware demonstrates this. It is possible to bring these benefits to our customers while working together with partners in a spirit of openness, trust and co-innovation.

For more information on SAP’s collaboration with VMware, read the white papers: “TCO and ROI Analysis of SAP Landscapes using VMware Technology” [PDF] and “Re-platforming SAP on VMware and EMC Storage Produces Superior Results for Callaway Golf Company” [PDF].

SAP today also announced significant new advances in the core areas of its cloud strategy: business network solutions, applications for lines of business, cloud platform development and virtualization. For more information, see: “SAP Advances Enterprise Cloud Strategy, Delivers New Innovations Across Applications and Platforms.”

To learn more about Gartner’s assessment of SAP’s technology strategy, see: “SAP Throws Down the Next-Generation Architecture Gauntlet With [SAP] HANA.”

For announcements, blog posts, videos and other coverage during SAPPHIRE NOW + SAP TechEd Madrid, visit the Events newsroom.

SAPPHIRE® NOW + SAP® TechEd Madrid
In 2011, SAP brings together its largest ecosystem education event series with its premier customer conference for a co-located event being held in Madrid, Spain, from November 8-10. With SAPPHIRE® NOW, SAP offers its customers, partners and prospects even more opportunities to engage in dialogue with peers, participants and thought leaders around the globe, and can gain insight as to how SAP is delivering on its product strategy and helping organizations around the world to run better. SAP® TechEd brings IT managers, software developers, administrators, and business process experts together for a look under the hood of today’s business motors: the latest advances in in-memory and mobile technologies, and in on-premise, on-demand, and on-device applications from SAP and more. Follow on Twitter at @SAPTechEd and @SAPPHIRENOW, and join the conversation at #SAPTechEd and #SAPPHIRENOW.

About SAP

As market leader in enterprise application software, SAP (NYSE: SAP) helps companies of all sizes and industries run better. From back office to boardroom, warehouse to storefront, desktop to mobile device – SAP empowers people and organizations to work together more efficiently and use business insight more effectively to stay ahead of the competition. SAP applications and services enable more than 176,000 customers (includes customers from the acquisition of Sybase) to operate profitably, adapt continuously, and grow sustainably. For more information, visit

Source: SAP

Whitepaper: Fair to Partly Cloudy

Whitepaper: Fair to Partly Cloudy

Fair to Partly Cloudy

While the cloud is often referred to in singular fashion, the reality is that enterprises looking to embrace cloud computing can choose from some very different approaches, each providing specific benefits—and challenges. This paper will describe IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS, revealing the unique characteristics of these cloud service delivery models. In addition, it will detail the distinct monitoring responsibilities and challenges of each model, and describe the specific capabilities organizations need to maximize the benefits of their cloud implementations.


The hype surrounding cloud computing has been enormous, but this is a case where the reality may in fact eclipse some of the most optimistic projections—the potential is that significant. Enterprises of virtually every size and type either already have or soon will be adopting cloud services in some fashion. Cloud adoption is already pervasive when factoring in SaaS services, which have been mainstays in hundreds of thousands of enterprises since long before the “cloud” terminology materialized. Further, analysts predict that, by 2012, cloud-based services will account for at least 50% of the new demand for managed IT infrastructure services.

Why is the move to cloud computing so compelling?

Organizations choose to adopt cloud computing for several reasons:

  • Cost savings. Compared with traditional software installations, organizations can save 50% or more when deploying applications in cloud environments.
  • Speed. Many cloud initiatives can go from start to production in days, rather than the lengthy deployment cycles of traditional infrastructure implementations.
  • Reduced overhead. Organizations can eliminate the time and expense of hardware and software procurement—and ongoing maintenance, support, and upgrades.
  • Flexibility. Organizations can accommodate spikes in computing demand—without over-provisioning during non-peak periods—and only pay for resources used.

The iEverything Enterprise: Virtualization, Cloud Computing and Wireless Technology

Whitepaper: The iEverything Enterprise

Virtualization, cloud computing, and wireless technology are fundamentally changing enterprise computing, providing revolutionary gains in productivity and cost savings. Powerful enterprise applications can now be delivered to almost any device, anywhere, at any time and take advantage of tremendous computing power available in consumer devices, such as smartphones and tablets. Regardless of whether these devices are issued corporately or personally owned, almost every IT department is experiencing the effects of unprecedented smart device adoption in their enterprise.

These changes demand that IT organizations think strategically about their Wi-Fi™ infrastructures, so that they can maximize the benefits of mobility and virtualization while helping ensure the flexibility needed to accommodate rapid growth and changing user needs. Integrating this new world of mobile, virtual computing begins with selecting the right wireless access infrastructure that can:

  • Scale to support many high-speed devices without service interruption
  • Easily integrate users’ diverse devices, whether company-issued or personally owned
  • Provide secure, reliable access to enterprise applications based on the users’ identities
  • Help eliminate inconsistent wireless performance
  • The Computing Paradigm Shift – Mobility Changes Everything

Just a few short years ago, if you claimed that “everything will access the network wirelessly and wires will be obsolete from the network access layer,” you would have been laughed out of the room. Since the 1990s, Wi-Fi has been implemented in laptop computers and by sheer momentum usage grew rapidly. However, wireless access remained little more than a convenient way to access basic services while away from your desk. Desktops and laptops continued to have wired network connections for their primary access and no IT manager in his right mind considered delivering mission-critical applications wirelessly. In 2007 about 300 million Wi-Fi devices were shipped, according to the Wi-Fi Alliance, and still Wi-Fi was not broadly leveraged for primary access.

However in 2007, Apple’s introduction of the Apple iPhone™ and iPod™ Touch changed everything. Although these devices did not greatly increase the number of Wi-Fi devices shipped, they demonstrated distinct use cases for how users could change their daily routines to incorporate mobility and increase productivity both at home and at work. The iPhone™, the iPad™, and the many smart devices that have followed since all have enough computing power to run business applications and enable robust, simultaneous voice and video communications. These devices, their inherent computing power, and their ease of use spurred all new use cases for smart devices and drove Wi-Fi adoption by consumers, who began bringing them to work and demanding to use them to become more productive. Additionally, commercial enterprises began to realize that leveraging virtualization on these low-cost devices would allow users to securely and reliably run mission critical operations.

A second trend, cloud computing, is contributing to a seismic change in how IT delivers services and applications and how users access them. When IT-enabled capabilities are delivered as a service ubiquitously to multiple users, they open the door to almost unlimited computing power on any device, anywhere, at any time.

Enterprises are not wasting any time taking advantage of these productivity enhancements. Analysts forecast that the number of devices shipped into the enterprise without any wired Ethernet ports will exceed the number with Ethernet ports as early as 2011. And the total number of Wi-Fi devices shipped in the enterprise will quadruple from 2009 to 20141. IT organizations are beginning to recognize that Wi-Fi can become a strategic, primary-access platform for application delivery, instead of just a convenient wireless connection.

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The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

A New Era for Cyber Crime Last September, the website of a well-known security journalist was hit by a massive DDoS attack. The site’s host stated it was the largest attack of that type they had ever seen. Rather than originating at an identifiable location, the attack seemed to come from everywhere, and it seemed…

Key Takeaways From Dyn’s DDoS Attack

Key Takeaways From Dyn’s DDoS Attack

DDoS Attack Takeaways  If you tried to access some of the world’s most popular websites, such as Twitter, Spotify, CNN, Netflix and The New York Times last Friday, you may have run into some trouble. Millions in the U.S. and Europe lost access to much of the internet in the wake of a cyberattack. Hackers…

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Security, Security, Security!! Get use to it as we’ll be hearing more and more of this in the coming years. Collaborative security efforts from around the world must start as sometimes it feels there is a sense of Fait Accompli, that it’s simply too late to feel safe in this digital age. We may not…

Security and the Potential of 2 Billion Device Failures

Security and the Potential of 2 Billion Device Failures

IoT Device Failures I have, over the past three years, posted a number of Internet of Things (and the broader NIST-defined Cyber Physical Systems) conversations and topics. I have talked about drones, wearables and many other aspects of the Internet of Things. One of the integration problems has been the number of protocols the various…

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

Individuals and Password-Sharing With the 1980s came the explosion of computing. In 1980, the Commodore ushered in the advent of home computing. Time magazine declared 1982 was “The Year of the Computer.” By 1983, there were an estimated 10 million personal computers in the United States alone. As soon as computers became popular, the federal government…

The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions Running a cloud server is no longer the novel trend it once was. Now, the cloud is a necessary data tier that allows employees to access vital company data and maintain productivity from anywhere in the world. But it isn’t a perfect system — security and performance issues can quickly…

Three Reasons Cloud Adoption Can Close The Federal Government’s Tech Gap

Three Reasons Cloud Adoption Can Close The Federal Government’s Tech Gap

Federal Government Cloud Adoption No one has ever accused the U.S. government of being technologically savvy. Aging software, systems and processes, internal politics, restricted budgets and a cultural resistance to change have set the federal sector years behind its private sector counterparts. Data and information security concerns have also been a major contributing factor inhibiting the…

Virtual Immersion And The Extension/Expansion Of Virtual Reality

Virtual Immersion And The Extension/Expansion Of Virtual Reality

Virtual Immersion And Virtual Reality This is a term I created (Virtual Immersion). Ah…the sweet smell of Virtual Immersion Success! Virtual Immersion© (VI) an extension/expansion of Virtual Reality to include the senses beyond visual and auditory. Years ago there was a television commercial for a bathing product called Calgon. The tagline of the commercial was Calgon…

Three Factors For Choosing Your Long-term Cloud Strategy

Three Factors For Choosing Your Long-term Cloud Strategy

Choosing Your Long-term Cloud Strategy A few weeks ago I visited the global headquarters of a large multi-national company to discuss cloud strategy with the CIO. I arrived 30 minutes early and took a tour of the area where the marketing team showcased their award winning brands. I was impressed by the digital marketing strategy…

Using Private Cloud Architecture For Multi-Tier Applications

Using Private Cloud Architecture For Multi-Tier Applications

Cloud Architecture These days, Multi-Tier Applications are the norm. From SharePoint’s front-end/back-end configuration, to LAMP-based websites using multiple servers to handle different functions, a multitude of apps require public and private-facing components to work in tandem. Placing these apps in entirely public-facing platforms and networks simplifies the process, but at the cost of security vulnerabilities. Locating everything…

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

How to Identify and Authenticate in the Expanding IoT Ecosystem It is a necessity to protect IoT devices and their associated data. As the IoT ecosystem continues to expand, the need to create an identity to newly-connected things is becoming increasingly crucial. These ‘things’ can include anything from basic sensors and gateways to industrial controls…


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