The Same Security Threats As Enterprise Computing

Security Threats

People have always feared that cloud computing is inherently lacking in security because of the distribution methods used, allowing it to be more public than necessary. But research and reports indicate that it is not less secure than enterprise computing as they actually both suffer from the same types of attack. And it does not matter if you are a small organization or a large one you will still be the target of cyber-attacks as most of them are opportunistic in nature.

While organizations and businesses are the target of online attacks, the real entryways for these attacks are unsecured personal computers. These form the backbone of the cyber-criminal’s arsenal. Hijacked computers referred to as zombies or bots are being used to make brute force attacks on different networks both within the cloud infrastructure and on-premise infrastructure. No one is actually safe, whatever kind of infrastructure that they are using. Others might be more privy to attacks due to the nature of their service like banks or the possible wealth of information that they bring, like Government networks and industry leaders in technology research.

According to Alert Logic’s Fall 2012 State of the Cloud Security Report, the variations in the threat activity across the industry is not as important as where the infrastructure is located. Attacks are not industry specific or organizational size specific, they depend on the infrastructure. This means that anything that can be possibly accessed from outside, whether enterprise or cloud, has equal chances of being attacked because as mentioned, attacks are opportunistic in nature.

The reason why cyber-attacks are indiscriminate to industry and size would be due to the nature of the attacker’s weapon, the internet. Web application-based attacks hit both service provider environments (53% of organizations) and on-premise environments (44% of organizations). But as a plus for cloud computing’s side, on-premise environment users or customers actually suffer more incidents than those of service provider environments. On-premise environment users experience an average of 61.4 attacks while service provider environment customers averaged only with 27.8 while on-premise environment users also suffered significantly more brute force attacks compared to their counterparts.

Despite real research and facts being provided by security Service Providers like Alert Logic, many organizations still base their infrastructure decisions on the “myth” that cloud computing is inherently less secure compared to enterprise computing or on-premise services. But instead of focusing their attention to these perceptions, organizations should be focusing on leveraging factual data to evaluate their own Vulnerabilities and then create a better plan for their security.

By Abdul Salam

The Manuscript.png
David Fletcher Blown Image
Hair Loss.png
The Backup.png
Gary Bernstein
Digital Transformation Keeping up with the times is now a need for any company since the world is always changing, and this is the reason digital transformation is so important. The cloud plays a crucial ...
Harish Chauhan
Adopting a Multi-cloud Strategy Cloud has been in existence since 2006 when Amazon Web Service (AWS1) first announced its cloud services for enterprise customers. Two years later, Google launched App Engine, followed by Alibaba and ...
Matthew Groves
NoSQL and the Media NoSQL is becoming the must have for organizations needing to manage data in ways that traditional relational databases were just not designed for. What has the industry media been saying about ...
RPA-Data
Accelerate Data Migration by 2X Ongoing trends in the Telco/DSP industry such as M&As, migration of the application to the cloud, and modernization of legacy applications have increased the frequency and scope of data migration ...
Bill Schmarzo
Mastering the Data Economic Multiplier Effect Note: this blog introduces the concept of the Marginal Propensity to Reuse which is the primary driver behind the Data Economic Multiplier Effect and the Schmarzo Economic Digital Asset Valuation Theorem. The Marginal ...