Survey Suggests Data Loss And Unauthorized Access Are Key To Internet Of Things

Unauthorized Access

The high performance network security, enterprise, and data centre firewall company Fortinet have just released the results of their latest survey and found that data loss and unauthorised access are the most important issues facing the internet of things today.

The survey, conducted in June 2014, asked more than 1,800 homeowners across the world about the key issues that effected both their belief in and desire to embrace the internet of things.

Other key findings include:

  • A significant majority – 61 percent – claimed that they believed that ‘connected home’ (a home in which household appliances and home electronics are all connected to the internet) is ‘extremely likely’ to become a reality in the next five years. In India – on average the most positive country about the internet of things – the figure rose as high as 69 percent. This is great news for the industry; there are expected to be 9 billion devices connected to the internet of things by 2018.
  • Data security remains a significant issue across all aspects of internet usage, and the internet of things is no different. Nearly three quarters (69 percent) of respondents to Fortinet’s survey said they were either ‘extremely concerned’ or ‘somewhat concerned’ that a connected appliance could result in a data breach or an exposure of sensitive, personal information. India was once again the highest ranked country, with 81 percent of respondents highlighting the issue.
  • The cost of implementing the internet of things in the home is not a deterrent to most users. When asked “would you be willing to pay for a new wireless router optimised for connected home devices”, 40 percent responded with “definitely” and another 48 percent said “maybe”; in a follow-on question more than 50 percent said they would pay more for their Internet service in order to “enable connected devices to function” in their home. Although, despite consumers’ willingness to pay for a quality infrastructure, homeowners across the world still claimed that price was the number one factor likely to influence them, followed by features/functionality and brand.

 

It is inevitable that privacy risks will arise as objects within the internet of things collect and aggregate fragments of data that relate to their service. The collation of multiple data points can swiftly become personal information as events are reviewed in the context of location, time, and recurrence, etc. Similarly to the early days of RFID tags in passports (when US-based passports could initially be read from 10 metres away with eBay equipment worth $250), the manufacturers and developers will need to find a way to eliminate these risks while still taking advantages of the benefits that that internet of things can offer.

By Daniel Price

Shopping Ny

3 Leading Dropshipping Platforms in 2020

Dropshipping Platforms Dropshipping has been growing tremendous interest over the years especially with the ability to access and source massive amounts of product inventory online ...
David Shearer

Looking Back – and Looking Forward to 2020

As we celebrate our thirtieth anniversary here at (ISC)², it’s incredible to look back at the changes our industry has been through. From advances in ...
Bigcommerce

Magento 1 Is Nearing Its End – Is It Time To Migrate To BigCommerce?

Time To Migrate To BigCommerce? Nearly three years ago, Magento declared that they would be ending support for their Magento 1 software. All versions of ...
David Friend

Cloud 2.0 will not be Ushered in by AWS or other Cloud Giants

Cloud 2.0 Trends Amazon, Google, and Microsoft are all pursuing similar business strategies: they want it all. ‘It,’ in this case, means the entire IT ...
Kyle Bernard Author

FlightHub and JustFly on Facial Recognition Technology, Travel and Privacy

Facial Recognition Technology For years facial recognition technology only existed in science books, television and cinema. The idea was brilliant. However, real-world technology hadn’t yet ...
Sebastian Grady

Digital Transformation – Updated Metrics for the Cloud Era

Cloud Era Metrics Undertaking digital transformation means also transforming how IT success is defined, including metrics that address business in the cloud.  With up to ...
Martin Mendelsohn

Who Should Protect Our Data?

Who Should Protect Our Data in The Cloud? You would think that cloud service providers are safe havens for your personal data – they all ...
Sam Bowman

Medical Data Online: What Are the Risks?

Medical Data in the Cloud Executive-level healthcare leaders must have a thorough understanding of cloud-based security risks. Patient data can vary from simple information such ...
Kayla Matthews

The California Consumer Privacy Act: What You Should Know

The California Consumer Privacy Act GDPR or the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation effectively altered the way that businesses interact with European citizens. It ...
Kayla Matthews

Higher-Ups More Likely to Break Policy, Data Breach Survey Finds

Data Protection Policies In an ideal scenario, the people at the highest levels of an organization would be the most likely to abide by data ...