Android Smartphone Security And Instagram App Testing

Android Smartphone Security

Our daily lives become more and more dependent on smartphones due to their high processing power and increased capabilities. Smartphones have features of both a mobile phone and a computer, allowing us to talk, text, tweet, email, browse the Internet, make purchases, manage bank accounts, and take pictures. “Smartphones’ popularity and relatively lax security have made them attractive targets for attackers to invade smartphones in various paths”.

 

Changes have been created in the mobile phone landscape with the introduction of smart phones running Android. Android is an open smartphone platform developed by the Google-led Open Handset Alliance. Scholars predict that the Android will control 45.4 percent of the market share by 2015 due to its open source nature and adoption by telecommunications providers worldwide. In fact, Open mobile platforms like Android provide an opportunity for consumers to access more applications. Applications can be installed on Android devices through the Android Market and other untrusted third party sites. Recent studies indicate that there are malicious applications that can be uploaded onto app stores and then successfully advertised to users. These malicious applications will access to a user’s personal information, all messages, network communication and services that cost money. Similarly, Kaspersky’s Internet security experts (2012) reported on more than 35,000 malicious Android programs. They explained the reasons for the huge growth in Android Malware:

  • The Android platform has become the most widespread operating system (OS) for new smartphones – it has over 70% market share. 
  • The open nature of the Android OS, the ease with which apps can be created, and the wide variety of (unofficial) application markets all have an influence on security.”

In line with this idea, a study has been recently conducted by a group of researchers at University of New Haven (UNHeFREG) to discover security issues within the social media, chatting, and dating app market on android. They observed app network traffic to find unencrypted data transmissions. They created a test network using Windows 7’s virtual miniport adapter. Then, they connected the android phone to this network to monitor all traffic being sent and received by the android device. An iPad was connected outside the test network and was used to exchange data to the android device. With this setup, they were able to capture a great deal of sensitive user information. In addition, they conducted server storage analysis and device storage analysis to find out how apps store user data on the server and device. Finally, they reported that anyone who uses many popular android apps (such as Instagram, Okcupid, ooVoo, Tango, Klk, Nimbuzz, MeetMe, MessageMe, TextMe, Grindr, HeyWire, Hike, and textPlus) is in danger of confidential data breaches. It would seem that the current Android security architecture and operating system cannot provide adequate security for Android mobile phone users.

As discussed above, the current Android security system has multiple flaws and Android users need new ways to protect their private personal data from a malicious attack. In order to improve our smartphone security, Fraces (2014) suggested several tips as follows: Selecting strong password or pattern; Installing and updating security solutions; Downloading applications only from trusted and reliable sources; Checking our apps permissions and rights; Performing regular updates of the O.S on our device; Preparing back up from our information frequently; Encrypting our confidential information; Beware of entering sensitive information on our smartphone; and Avoiding jailbraking or rooting of the device.

By Mojgan Afshari

Matt Holleran

Cloud Platforms, Marketplaces, and Startups

Cloud Platforms, Marketplaces, and Startups One of the most exciting recent developments in the cloud software business is the proliferation of partner ecosystems, with large public and late-stage private cloud companies creating their own marketplaces ...
Gary Bernstein

Infographic: The Data That Never Sleeps

Here’s What Happens Every Minute on the Internet in 2020 In 2020, the world changed fundamentally – and so did the data that makes the world go around. As COVID-19 swept the world, nearly every ...
Ronald van Loon

The Secrets to a Successful Desktop-as-a-Service Approach

The Secrets to a Successful Desktop-as-a-Service Approach Organizations are under pressure to reinvent their business models and adopt new technologies and digital capabilities to manage challenging conditions and adapt to new remote work scenarios. By ...
Anita Raj

A Winning Data Strategy Series Part 4: Are Your Data-driven Insights Driving Business Results?

Are your data-driven insights driving business results? This is the fourth piece of a 5-part series on plugging the obvious but overlooked gaps in achieving digital success through a refined data strategy. How would you ...
Deepak Jayagopal

Leveraging DevOps Infrastructure as Code to Improve Cloud Provisioning Time by 65%

Improving Cloud Provisioning Time Infrastructure provisioning used to be a highly manual process for Digital Service Providers (DSPs). Infrastructure engineers would rack and stack the servers and will manually configure them. Then they will install ...
Scott Leatherman

Speeding up Digital Transformation During the Pandemic – 7 Steps to Unlocking the Benefits of Cloud

7 Steps to Unlocking the Benefits of Cloud The pressure for IT leaders to support more workloads and remote staff with limited resources is as contagious as the pandemic. The most powerful tool in their ...