Big Data Sports: How Data Is Changing The Future Of Sports

Big Data Sports

Big Data has reached into the innermost areas of our lives. The way we manage cities, shape communities and go about building personal relationships is changing thanks to Big Data. Sports is one other area that’s increasingly witnessing changes in big data acquisition, analytics and, subsequently, performance and revenue optimization through data-driven insights.

The benefits of Big Data in sports apply roughly to two groups: the fans and the teams, though advertisers and individual athletes stand to gain as well.

The Fans

The fans can be understood much better with Big Data. Social media tracking establishes trends and patterns that alert teams to changing perceptions. Predictive marketing can be done on a much wider scale, smartly bringing together past purchases present attractive offers. Team apps help greatly to that aim. Bought a Mercedes hat? Perhaps you’d like a Lewis Hamilton t-shirt at a discount.

Big Data Sports

Accessible statistics make the game more fun as well. The IBM Slam Tracker was introduced at the 2014 French Open at Roland Garros. It showcased not only point-by-point winning odds of the contestants, but also displayed the players’ real-time popularity on social media. Such number-crunching cannot influence the end result, but it adds a whole new layer to games that, unlike poker, couldn’t boast real-time insights better than that the commentators’ educated guesses.

(Image Source: http://www.wimbledon.com/en_GB/slamtracker/)

The stadium is an area where innovations can be used to great extent. iBeacon, an Apple app catered to retailers and customers, is used in stadiums not only to push offers for seat upgrades and discounts at food stalls, but to inform the viewer about the lines at the bathrooms, better direct viewer flow and improve the overall “on-site experience”.

The Teams

Some of Germany’s success in the World Cup can be attributed to Big Data. The team made use of Match Insights, a tool developed by the German SAP, that allowed the coaches of national teams “to crawl through complex video and make it simple for them to know what they need to win”. Match Insights utilizes data capture from on-field cameras and helps pinpoint the areas, or plays in which players need improvement, boosting the efficiency of practice sessions.

Capturing data is key. It’s done in the NBA and NFL as well. Athletes train with sensors that monitor their heart rates, reaction times and distance covered. The data can be used to prevent injury in-game; crunched later on, this data can provide performance insights as well.

But you don’t have to be a million-dollar team to have such statistics at your fingertips. Golfing apps are available to Android and iOS users alike; they gather statistics that show areas of their game that need improvement. Players can surmise which clubs work best, how their plays have varied over time, and their best plays.

With all this, won’t the “spirit” of competitive sports die away if numbers become all that’s important? However effective, Big Data doesn’t take away from the fact that what you see are real players with real sweat and real blood. It’s getting more interesting, not necessarily more predictable.

By Lauris Veips

Rakesh Soni
Customer Experience: Living In A Connected World and Winning the IoT Race IoT and smart interconnected systems have already created an invisible aura of convenience, usability, and a rich user experience around us. However, when ...
Ray Meiring
Proposal Management Software Benefits Amid the COVID-19 pandemic-induced supply chain and market challenges, 2021 started to course correct, allowing many companies to resume business operations. As a result, request for proposals (RFPs), sales proposals, and ...
Cloud Image Migration
Effective Cloud Migration Monitoring The global pandemic witnessed the digital transformation of businesses in the cloud.  Today, even as the world resumes to normal, the end-to-end innovation in business strategies has kept the momentum going ...
Dana Gardner
Low-code Development Has Entered a Maturity Spurt Closing the gap between the applications and services a company needs -- and the ones they can actually produce -- has long been a missing keystone for attaining ...
MIT
Smart Manufacturing Startups AI and machine learning's potential to drive greater visibility, control, and insight across shop floors while monitoring machines and processes in real-time continue to attract venture capital. $62 billion is now invested ...
  • Plural Site

    Pluralsite

    Pluralsight provides online courses on popular programming languages and developer tools. Other courses cover fields such as IT security best practices, server infrastructure, and virtualization.

  • Isc2

    ISC2

    (ISC)² provides IT training, certifications, and exams that run online, on your premises, or in classrooms. Self-study resources are available. You can also train groups of 10 or more of your employees. If you want a job in cybersecurity, this is the route to take.

  • App Academy

    App Academy

    Immersive software engineering programs. No experience required. Pay $0 until you're hired. Join an online info session to learn more

  • Cybrary

    Cybrary

    CYBRARY Open source Cyber Security learning. Free for everyone, forever. The world's largest cyber security community. Cybrary provides free IT training and paid IT certificates. Courses for beginners, intermediates, and advanced users are available.