Web Concerns – Strong Passwords and Data Encryption

Strong Passwords and Data Encryption

For all the concerns and buzz surrounding cloud computing, some companies are still not buying in. The benefits that come from using the cloud are already well documented, and while adoption rates have risen in recent years, a number of organizations remain opposed to the idea. There is no single reason for this reluctance, but much of their hesitation is motivated by fear of what is cloud computing and how it could negatively affect their companies. Some of these fears can be easily addressed, however, and eventually overcome. If your business is still unsure about moving to the cloud, here are some reasons for you to consider that will hopefully set your mind at ease.

1. Cloud Security is Better Than Ever

One of the biggest fears still associated with cloud computing is that of security. According to a recent survey by RightScale, 31 percent of respondents said security was their top concern. In fact, security was the one worry listed more than any other. In the aftermath of numerous security breaches at large corporations, it’s understandable that companies would be wary of placing much of their data into the hands of another party. Cloud providers have responded to these worries by greatly improving their security features. That includes many features that smaller businesses wouldn’t be able to afford or implement, like two-factor authentication. When adopting a cloud service, it’s important to note that a provider can only do so much for security. The client needs to ensure they’re doing their part, like employing strong passwords and encrypting data.

2. Data Loss is Becoming Less of a Problem

Attached to the security fear is the worry over having a third party lose data that’s crucial to the operations of a company. Cloud vendors are well aware of this concern and, like the security issue, have gone to great lengths to address it. As always, it’s important that any company planning on moving to the cloud properly vet a prospective cloud provider, ensuring they have a clean reputation regarding data loss. Any contracts signed should also have contingencies built in describing what responsibility the vendor has in the unfortunate event that data is lost.

3. The Cloud Can Streamline Operations

Another significant fear for businesses is the overall effect cloud computing will have on their operations. Making such a transition can produce some hiccups, but cloud providers have worked hard to make the move as smooth as possible. Prospective companies can ease the process by slowly introducing the various services that vendors offer. Some businesses start off by adopting email services, then slowly moving into data storage, file sharing, and other services. In fact, much of a company’s operations can become streamlined to the point where they offset any noticeable disruptions at the beginning. The cloud can also facilitate cooperation and collaboration, making employees even more productive.

4. cloud services Have Become More Compliant

Moving to the public cloud means adopting services that have to work well with a company’s existing programs and operations. Some companies may even choose to adopt multiple cloud services at once, which may complicate things. Luckily, many cloud services have been developed or upgraded with compliance issues in mind. This allows companies to use different programs with new cloud services with minimal problems. Cloud providers have a lot of different factors to take into account when developing services, factors like operating systems, on-site security features, and privacy considerations. By focusing on making services as compatible with as many platforms as possible, it ensures greater compliance, thereby meeting the demands of companies looking to adopt them.

Fears are tough to get over, especially relating to adopting a new technology. Branching out into new territory can be a risky maneuver, but it’s worth it when that territory includes cloud computing. Many of the biggest concerns surrounding the cloud have either been addressed or are currently being worked on to ensure companies feel confident in making the move. With enough education and preparation, your organization will be ready to make the cloud a permanent feature.

By Rick Delgado

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