Are You Sure You Are Ready To Move Online

Hair Loss.png
It’s Magic
Answer To Everything.png
Growing Up.png
The Backup.png

Type of Cloud

Continuing this theme on “Are you ready for the Cloud”, we are going to move forward with a new question: What type a cloud? That can be encompassed with many different connotations. It could mean it’s going to be hosted by a provider, or is it going to be an on-prem cloud? It is it going to be managed or is it un-managed? It could be a PRODUCTION cloud or is it a DR or a DEV cloud?

Today, we are going to talk about a new type, one based on Function. How is that possible? Some clouds are actually designed for a specific purposed. It’s easy to say that it is a PRODUCTION cloud or a DEV/TEST Instance. But what if you need a cloud to perform a certain way for only the applications that get assigned to it?

Take this for example: You need a cloud that can out perform your other clouds because you are going to move some high IOP dependent systems to it? What do you do? How do you build that cloud out to support what you need?

First, you need to have control over the whole cloud, not just the instances. You can create individual high-speed instances if you use a hosted automated system, but if it is going to be an on-prem cloud, then you will need to have control over it.

High Speed

The high-speed cloud is broken down several ways, but we are going to focus on five: Compute, RAM, Network, Local Disk and Remote Disk. So, lets break it down:

  • Compute is easy it’s your CPU Cores. At one time we would just say CPUs, but now a days we know the Cores are everything
  • RAM is RAM. The faster you get, the better you are
  • Networking is HUGE! If you are building your cloud in a corporate environment, you should be taking advantage of the fastest network speeds available. If you have 10GB Ethernet connections, then you should be using a few for every Compute Node.
  • Local Disk is important also. Not only do you need it for your OS, but also for direct storage capability. Local storage is handled differently, so you should be aware of that. If you 15K disks spinning in the Compute nodes; that will give you a great start for simple storage, as long as you watch the sizes of the volumes you create.
  • Remote disk can be a corporation’s saving grace. Local storage can fill up fast, and you are limited to the number of IOPS your disks can spit out. Going with a remote flash/SSD system can get you upwards of 500K IOPS per second. WAY faster than a local disk.

So you start assembling your cloud. You take several Compute nodes, and you load them up with CPU cores, RAM and high-speed local disks. Then you have your Compute nodes attach to the remote disks (or sub systems) to create and provide the big, fast chunks of storage.

Now, when you send your high-speed applications to it, you separate out the application servers and database servers within the cloud so the Compute nodes can focus on running one task, instead of hundreds.

Can you add other server instances to the Compute nodes? Yes, but make sure you do some system tests first to make sure you are not using to much horsepower for one application, and then starving another.

By Richard Thayer

Threat Security

Azure Red Hat OpenShift: What You Should Know

Azure Red Hat OpenShift: What You Should Know What Is Azure Red Hat OpenShift? Red Hat OpenShift provides a Kubernetes platform for enterprises. Azure Red Hat OpenShift permits you to deploy fully-managed OpenShift clusters in ...
Alex Tkatch

Dare to Innovate: 3 Best Practices for Designing and Executing a New Product Launch

Best Practices for Designing and Executing a Product Launch Nothing in entrepreneurial life is more exciting, frustrating, time-consuming and uncertain than launching a new product. Creating something new and different can be exhilarating, assuming everything ...
Martin Mendelsohn

Of Rogues, Fear and Chicanery: The Colonial Pipeline Dilemma and CISO/CSO Priorities

The Colonial Pipeline Dilemma The Colonial Pipeline is one of a number of essential energy and infrastructure assets that have been recently targeted by the global ransomware group DarkSide, and other aspiring non-state actors, with ...
James Corbishly

Addressing Teams Sprawl in the Remote Workspace

Teams Sprawl in the Remote Workspace As working from home has become the new everyday norm, with more employers embracing the remote-work model as a new and likely permanent fixture of the employment world, there ...
Jim Fagan

The Geopolitics of Subsea Connectivity

Subsea Connectivity Digital transformation and the migration of data and applications to the cloud is a global phenomenon. While we may like to think that the cloud knows no borders, the reality is that geopolitics ...

CLOUD MONITORING

The CloudTweaks technology lists will include updated resources to leading services from around the globe. Examples include leading IT Monitoring Services, Bootcamps, VPNs, CDNs, Reseller Programs and much more...

  • Datadog

    DataDog

    DataDog is a startup based out of New York which secured $31 Million in series C funding. They are quickly making a name for themselves and have a truly impressive client list with the likes of Adobe, Salesforce, HP, Facebook and many others.

  • Opsview

    Opsview

    Opsview is a global privately held IT Systems Management software company whose core product, Opsview Enterprise was released in 2009. The company has offices in the UK and USA, boasting some 35,000 corporate clients. Their prominent clients include Cisco, MIT, Allianz, NewVoiceMedia, Active Network, and University of Surrey.

  • Sematext Logo

    Sematext

    Sematext bridges the gap between performance monitoring, real user monitoring, transaction tracing, and logs. Sematext all-in-one monitoring platform gives businesses full-stack visibility by exposing logs, metrics, and traces through a single Cloud or On-Premise solution. Sematext helps smart DevOps teams move faster.

  • Nagios

    Nagios

    Nagios is one of the leading vendors of IT monitoring and management tools offering cloud monitoring capabilities for AWS, EC2 (Elastic Compute Cloud) and S3 (Simple Storage Service). Their products include infrastructure, server, and network monitoring solutions like Nagios XI, Nagios Log Server, and Nagios Network Analyzer.