The Necessity of Education in 3D Printing

3D Printing Education

3D printing innovations have been steadily moving from imagination to reality in recent years with a solid incline in commercial and industrial use, as well as a significant number of 3D printing devices popping up in homes. However, it seems the education sector hasn’t yet embraced the trend which many experts believe could offer value to the learning environment while simultaneously training our future users and developers in the technology. In a recent international survey conducted by Dimensional Research it was found that 87% of schools restrict student access to 3D printing, with three primary failures taking much of the blame: poor control of management and access to the 3D printing devices; poor management of material and time costs to be allocated to departmental expenses; and a lack of direction for the use of 3D printing in current curriculums. For those of us who recognize the value of this significant technology, such downfalls seem ridiculous impediments.

What 3D Printing Brings to Education

Though obviously faced with a few administrative hurdles, key considerations for educational institutions employing 3D printers in their curriculums include intensified motivation and creativity, as well as the recognition of the value of instruction in such technology. Already, STEAM subjects (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics) are recognised as areas able to benefit substantially from access to 3D printing, and suggests Mark Yorke, MD (UK) of education consultancy firm Tablet Academy,

“Educational institutions are challenged to prepare young people for jobs that don’t even exist yet. 3D printing will certainly form part of the technological advancements happening across the world so providing educators with the opportunity to experience and understand this emerging technology can only be a positive move for all involved.”

Encouraging Adoption in Schools

Gladly, the challenges to suitable utilization in schools are recognized, and along with administrators and educators looking for better ways to implement 3D printing technologies into their programs, a few external organizations are incentivizing and encouraging more intensive adoption. One such construction, the Ultimaker Pioneer Program, launched in August last year, calling educators to share their 3D printing work and experience with other forerunners, and shortly thereafter the Ultimaker Education Challenge was introduced asking educators if they challenge their students to get the best out of themselves and whether they believe it vital to let students discover their talents through experimentation and exploration. Over 250 entrants sent in their 3D printing ideas and designs and over 50 winners were announced at the recent BETT Show in London.

Another structure working to promote 3D printing in classrooms, MakerBot’s Educators Program is targeting classrooms across the United States as it attempts to help teachers exchange knowledge, receive guidance, and participate in challenges. Says Drew Lentz, MakerBot Learning Manager,

“After recently establishing Thingiverse Education, now the largest collection of 3D printing lesson plans online, we saw an immediate response from hundreds of teachers who were excited to contribute content and share best practices with peers. The new MakerBot Educators Program is taking it a step further by forging a closer relationship between MakerBot and the most engaged teachers of our community.”

And GE will, over the next five years, be investing $10 million in its own educational program, GE Additive Education Program, an initiative aimed at developing student skills in 3D printing technology. Recognizing the rapidity of growth in the industry, GE is one of a few forward-thinking companies that hopes to diminish future challenges by developing a skilled additive manufacturing workforce.

What Lies Ahead?

The future of 3D printing is unknowable, but it seems very likely that the technology will be a feature in every factory and home in the years to come. From printing body parts to be used in regenerative medicine, to the less exotic replacement parts for machinery, to the fascinating area of food production, investigations seem to cross all fields and potentials are expansive. And so, educating our youth in this ground-breaking sphere is a considerably worthy move.

by Jennifer Klostermann

Martin Mendelsohn

Of Rogues, Fear and Chicanery: The Colonial Pipeline Dilemma and CISO/CSO Priorities

The Colonial Pipeline Dilemma The Colonial Pipeline is one of a number of essential energy and infrastructure assets that have been recently targeted by the global ransomware group DarkSide, and other aspiring non-state actors, with ...
Fernando Castanheira

How the Shift to Hybrid Work Will Impact Digital Transformations

The Shift to Hybrid Work Before COVID-19, most enterprises had a digital transformation in flight, but the pandemic threw those programs into hyperdrive. Scrambling to accommodate workforces that were suddenly working online and mostly from ...
Matrix

Are We Building The Matrix?…

When sci-fi films like Tom Cruise’s Oblivion depict humans living in the clouds, we imagine that humanity might one day leave our primitive dwellings attached to the ground and ascend to floating castles in the ...
Dr. Mike Lloyd

How to Mitigate Security Risks in the Cloud

How to Mitigate Security Risks in the Cloud Enterprises continue to spend billions annually on security technology, yet cyber breaches continue to come fast and furious. So what exactly is going on here? Why are ...
David Loo

The Long-term Costs of Data Debt: How Inaccurate, Incomplete, and Outdated Information Can Harm Your Business

The Long-term Costs of Data Debt It’s no secret that many of today’s enterprises are experiencing an extreme state of data overload. With the rapid adoption of new technologies to accommodate pandemic-induced shifts like remote ...

CLOUD MONITORING

The CloudTweaks technology lists will include updated resources to leading services from around the globe. Examples include leading IT Monitoring Services, Bootcamps, VPNs, CDNs, Reseller Programs and much more...

  • Opsview

    Opsview

    Opsview is a global privately held IT Systems Management software company whose core product, Opsview Enterprise was released in 2009. The company has offices in the UK and USA, boasting some 35,000 corporate clients. Their prominent clients include Cisco, MIT, Allianz, NewVoiceMedia, Active Network, and University of Surrey.

  • Nagios

    Nagios

    Nagios is one of the leading vendors of IT monitoring and management tools offering cloud monitoring capabilities for AWS, EC2 (Elastic Compute Cloud) and S3 (Simple Storage Service). Their products include infrastructure, server, and network monitoring solutions like Nagios XI, Nagios Log Server, and Nagios Network Analyzer.

  • Datadog

    DataDog

    DataDog is a startup based out of New York which secured $31 Million in series C funding. They are quickly making a name for themselves and have a truly impressive client list with the likes of Adobe, Salesforce, HP, Facebook and many others.

  • Sematext Logo

    Sematext

    Sematext bridges the gap between performance monitoring, real user monitoring, transaction tracing, and logs. Sematext all-in-one monitoring platform gives businesses full-stack visibility by exposing logs, metrics, and traces through a single Cloud or On-Premise solution. Sematext helps smart DevOps teams move faster.