Want to dip your toe into the cloud? Challenges of a Large Migration

Want to dip your toe into the cloud? Challenges of a Large Migration

Challenges of a Large Migration Migrating to the cloud can be a daunting task. First you have to go through an exhaustive process deciding what to migrate, then you have to do plenty of scripting and re-architecting to get all that to cloud, all while
Greetings from Atlanta – a City Held Hostage

Greetings from Atlanta – a City Held Hostage

What’s it like to live in a city under cyber siege? It’s surprisingly calm. The taps run, trash is collected, 911 works and planes land and takeoff. That’s what is scary. Live in Atlanta where ransomware has locked out city officials, employees and constituents from

CONTRIBUTORS

The Five Rules of Security and Compliance in the Public Cloud Era

The Five Rules of Security and Compliance in the Public Cloud Era

Security and Compliance  With technology at the heart of businesses today, IT systems and data are being targeted by criminals, ...
7 Cloud Security Mistakes Bound To Bite You

7 Cloud Security Mistakes Bound To Bite You

7 Main Cloud Security Mistakes  Like sharks off the coast of North Carolina this summer, information security threats are lurking ...
State of the Cloud Report

State of the Cloud Report

Cloud Report As the definitive guide to the biggest trends in the cloud industry, this year’s “State of the Cloud ...

RECENT NEWS

Capgemini in Gartner Magic Quadrant

Capgemini in Gartner Magic Quadrant

Paris, November 9, 2018 – Capgemini, today announced that Capgemini (Prosodie) has been positioned as a Leader by Gartner in its ...
The New Industrial Revolution – According to the WSJ

The New Industrial Revolution – According to the WSJ

The insert in today’s US print edition of the Wall Street Journal is called The New Industrial Revolution. The paper updates ...
Pressure grows on Zuckerberg to attend Facebook committee hearing

Pressure grows on Zuckerberg to attend Facebook committee hearing

Australia, Argentina and Ireland join UK and Canada in urging Facebook CEO to give evidence to parliaments Parliamentary committees from ...
Oracle Cloud Unveils New HPC Offerings to Support Mission Critical Workloads

Oracle Cloud Unveils New HPC Offerings to Support Mission Critical Workloads

Oracle Cloud Unveils New HPC Offering Oracle now provides a complete set of solutions for any high performance computing workload, ...
IDC Forecasts 5G Network Infrastructure Revenue to Reach $26 Billion in 2022 as Network Build-Outs Progress and 5G-Enabled Solutions Gain Traction

IDC Forecasts 5G Network Infrastructure Revenue to Reach $26 Billion in 2022 as Network Build-Outs Progress and 5G-Enabled Solutions Gain Traction

FRAMINGHAM, Mass., November 6, 2018 – A new report from International Data Corporation (IDC) presents IDC's inaugural forecast for the worldwide ...
waterloo-1

Batteryless smart devices closer to reality

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have taken a huge step towards making smart devices that do not use batteries or require charging.

These battery-free objects, which feature an IP address for internet connectivity, are known as Internet of Things (IoT) devices. If an IoT device can operate without a battery it lowers maintenance costs and allows the device to be placed in areas that are off the grid.

Many of these IoT devices have sensors in them to detect their environment, from a room’s ambient temperature and light levels to sound and motion, but one of the biggest challenges is making these devices sustainable and battery-free.

Professor Omid Abari, Postdoctoral Fellow Ju Wang and Professor Srinivasan Keshav from Waterloo’s Cheriton School of Computer Science have found a way to hack radio frequency identification (RFID) tags, the ubiquitous squiggly ribbons of metal with a tiny chip found in various objects, and give the devices the ability to sense the environment.

Postdoctoral fellow Ju Wang (centre) and Professor Omid Abari demonstrate the wireless keypad clicker they invented by hacking RFID sensors with tiny push-button switches.

“It’s really easy to do,” said Wang. “First, you remove the plastic cover from the RFID tag, then cut out a small section of the tag’s antenna with scissors, then attach a sensor across the cut bits of the antenna to complete the circuit.”

In their stock form, RFID tags provide only identification and location. It’s the hack the research team has done — cutting the tag’s antenna and placing a sensing device across it — that gives the tag the ability to sense its environment.

To give a tag eyes, the researchers hacked an RFID tag with a phototransistor, a tiny sensor that responds to different levels of light.

By exposing the phototransistor to light, it changed the characteristics of the RFID’s antenna, which in turn caused a change in the signal going to the reader. They then developed an algorithm on the reader side that monitors change in the tag’s signal, which is how it senses light levels.

Among the simplest of hacks is adding a switch to an RFID tag so it can act as a keypad that responds to touch.

“We see this as a good example of a complete software-hardware system for IoT devices,” Abari said. “We hacked simple hardware — we cut RFID tags and placed a sensor on them. Then we designed new algorithms and combined the software and hardware to enable new applications and capabilities.

“Our main contribution is showing how simple it is to hack an RFID tag to create an IoT device. It’s so easy a novice could do it.”

The research paper by Wang, Abari and Keshav titled, Challenge: RFID Hacking for Fun and Profit-ACM MobiCom, appeared in the Proceedings of the 24th Annual International Conference on Mobile Computing and Networking, October 29–November 2, 2018, New Delhi, India, 461– 70.

Source: UWaterloo News

CloudBuzz

The latest in curated technology related news from around the globe.

CloudBuzz material is source credited with ​attribution.

Cloud Community Supporters

(ISC)²
Cisco
SAP
CA Technologies
Dropbox

Cloud community support comes from (paid) sponsorship or (no cost) collaborative network partnership initiatives.