Bbc Tech
BBC Tech

Slow websites to be labelled by Chrome browser

Websites that load slowly because they are poorly coded could soon be flagged by Google’s Chrome browser.

Google said it was working on several “speed badging” systems that let visitors know why a page is taking time to show up.

The variations include simple text warnings and more subtle signs that indicate a site is slow.

No date has been given for when the badging system will be included with the Chrome browser.

Coding quirks

In a blog, Google said it started the project to “to help users understand when a site may load slowly, while rewarding sites delivering fast experiences”.

It said it was working on metrics that could spot when sites are “authored” in a way that makes them slow generally. The quirks of many web technologies make it easy for developers to code pages so they take a long time to appear…

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