Gaming as a Service – The Future of Cloud Gaming

Gaming as a Service

“Gaming is no child’s play; it’s big business!”

Quick, what’s the first thing that comes to mind when you visualize gaming? If you are thinking “unsocial teenager whose only exercise is moving his fingers on the computer keyboard”, you are wrong. While unsocial teenagers do comprise a big chunk of the gaming market, the appeal of video/computer games transcends demographics.

Gaming’s universal appeal is why it racks up the big numbers. Since the last two years, gaming has been bringing in more revenue than Hollywood. Individual titles have outperformed the biggest blockbusters, and the trend is expected to continue. Consider this: in April 2008, Grand Theft Auto IV had grossed $310 million within 24 hours of its release – comfortably more than the most successful book (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, at $220 million in 24 hours) and the most successful film (Spider-Man 3 at $117 million). As of today, gaming is a $10 billion-plus industry.

So, where does cloud computing enter the picture?

Cloud computing is already a part of this industry, via the phenomenon of social gaming. If MMORPG doesn’t mean anything to you, it stands for Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game, one of the most successful human collaborations of all time. Players across the globe, from the comforts of their homes, play each other in cyberspace, cooperating and competing in titles like Age of Empires, Halo, Unreal Tournament, etc. And all this is possible due to cloud computing.

Even as the players play on their individual machines, there are distant servers which host these games and enable the shared experience. Now, there are companies which want to expand the influence of cloud computing in gaming for an enhanced user experience.

The computers used for gaming are one of the most sophisticated out there, and not without reason. A lot of processing power is required to drive those 3-D graphics, complex algorithms and artificial intelligence that modern games are equipped with. However, this has a downside. It keeps owners of less powerful machines out of the loop, and hence, out of the gaming market. Now, OnLive, a gaming company out of Palo Alto, California, is seeking to change that.

If you are familiar with SaaS, IaaS and PaaS , OnLive seeks to provide something new – GaaS or Gaming as a Service. The company seeks to reshape “the way we think about and use digital media – The shift to cloud computing, displacing the limitations, cost and complexity of local computing.”

In a nutshell, what OnLive is offering is the ability to play games through a subscription service without having to download software or worry about hardware requirements. The company first announced this unique service at the Game Developer’s Conference in June last year. At that time, OnLive’s CEO Steve Perlman said, “With OnLive we’ve cleared the last remaining hurdle for the video games industry: effective online distribution. By putting the value back into the games themselves and removing the reliance on expensive, short-lived hardware, we are dramatically shifting the economics of the industry.”

Since then, OnLive has made several popular titles available – Assassin’s Creed II, Batman: Arkham Asylum, Mass Effect 2 – with several more in the pipeline. With existing partnerships with the big names of gaming like Electronic Arts, Atari, UbiSoft, Warner Bros. Interactive and Sega, OnLive’s portfolio is set to grow substantially. I will not be surprised if the existing leaders in gaming consoles – Sony, Microsoft and Nintendo – also decide to enter the market.

Gaming on the cloud is set to become the hottest trend of the year!

By Sourya Biswas

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

Connecting With Customers In The Cloud

Connecting With Customers In The Cloud

Customers in the Cloud Global enterprises in every industry are increasingly turning to cloud-based innovators like Salesforce, ServiceNow, WorkDay and Aria, to handle critical systems like billing, IT services, HCM and CRM. One need look no further than Salesforce’s and Amazon’s most recent earnings report, to see this indeed is not a passing fad, but…

Data Breaches: Incident Response Planning – Part 1

Data Breaches: Incident Response Planning – Part 1

Incident Response Planning – Part 1 The topic of cybersecurity has become part of the boardroom agendas in the last couple of years, and not surprisingly — these days, it’s almost impossible to read news headlines without noticing yet another story about a data breach. As cybersecurity shifts from being a strictly IT issue to…

The Importance of Cloud Backups: Guarding Your Data Against Hackers

The Importance of Cloud Backups: Guarding Your Data Against Hackers

The Importance of Cloud Backups Cloud platforms have become a necessary part of modern business with the benefits far outweighing the risks. However, the risks are real and account for billions of dollars in losses across the globe per year. If you’ve been hacked, you’re not alone. Here are some other companies in the past…

Using Cloud Technology In The Education Industry

Using Cloud Technology In The Education Industry

Education Tech and the Cloud Arguably one of society’s most important functions, teaching can still seem antiquated at times. Many schools still function similarly to how they did five or 10 years ago, which is surprising considering the amount of technical innovation we’ve seen in the past decade. Education is an industry ripe for innovation…

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

The Legal Battle For Privacy In early June 2013, Edward Snowden made headlines around the world when he leaked information about the National Security Agency (NSA) collecting the phone records of tens of millions of Americans. It was a dramatic story. Snowden flew to Hong Kong and then Russia to avoid deportation to the US,…

7 Common Cloud Security Missteps

7 Common Cloud Security Missteps

Cloud Security Missteps Cloud computing remains shrouded in mystery for the average American. The most common sentiment is, “It’s not secure.” Few realize how many cloud applications they access every day: Facebook, Gmail, Uber, Evernote, Venmo, and the list goes on and on… People flock to cloud services for convenient solutions to everyday tasks. They…

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

Individuals and Password-Sharing With the 1980s came the explosion of computing. In 1980, the Commodore ushered in the advent of home computing. Time magazine declared 1982 was “The Year of the Computer.” By 1983, there were an estimated 10 million personal computers in the United States alone. As soon as computers became popular, the federal government…

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

Hybrid-Cloud Approach For over 20 years, organizations have been attempting to secure their networks and protect their data. However, have any of their efforts really improved security? Today we hear journalists and industry experts talk about the erosion of the perimeter. Some say it’s squishy, others say it’s spongy, and yet another claims it crunchy.…