Category Archives: Cloud Computing

Which Is Better For Your Company: Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment?

Which Is Better For Your Company: Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment?

Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment?

You know how enterprise resource management (ERP) can improve processes within your supply chain, and the things to keep in mind when implementing an ERP system. But do you know if cloud-based or on-premise ERP deployment is better for your company or industry?

While cloud computing is becoming more and more popular, it is worth taking a moment to assess both options to determine what is best for you.

There are a lot of considerations when it comes to ERP deployment. Need for flexibility, security requirements, cost, and even accounting practices can influence which avenue you choose.

Here are a few things you need to keep in mind when deciding how to deploy your ERP system.

Cloud Implementation Strategies

The Cost of the Cloud

It is true that ERP in the cloud is more cost-effective to implement in the short-term. It eliminates the need to procure and maintain servers. Additionally, your cloud ERP provider will have its own team of IT technicians to ensure your system is running smoothly and your data is safe, which can save you time and money in labor costs.

shutterstock_173451446 (1)

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

But it also requires ongoing subscription costs, which can entail high annual costs and hidden fees. Be sure to calculate the true cost of the cloud solution you’re interested in before you sign off on it.

Accounting for the Cloud

Similarly, your company’s attitude towards capital investments versus expenses can have a big impact on whether cloud implementation is right for your company. CFOs who want to minimize capital expenditures will be more amenable to cloud deployment than will CFOs who prefer to make a capital investment in servers, which can be depreciated over time.

It is a good idea to ask your CFO for their perspective before committing too strongly to one method or the other, as the balance sheet may have more of an impact on your decision than you realize.

How Much Control Do You Need?

In one way, cloud ERP software is very flexible and easy to deploy, because it only requires the click of a button rather than physically installing software on physical servers.

Components of Enterprise Resource Planning

But this flexibility comes at the cost of customizability. Because cloud solutions are shared with other companies, there is less ability to customize the software to your specific needs. Consider how much control you need over the specifics of your ERP system, and see if cloud solutions are able to accommodate those needs. Or, find a cloud-based ERP provider that does allow you the freedom to customize your solution.

Accessibility and Security

One of the great things about cloud storage is that there is no limit to the amount of data you can store. Another great feature is that your staff can access it anywhere. As long as they have a phone or computer, they have access to real-time data.


While people can at times be concerned about the security of their data when it’s in the cloud, companies providing cloud-based ERP have highly-secure networks and procedures to guarantee the security of your data. And remember, no way of storing data is foolproof; there are risks to keeping your data on your own servers, as well.

For even more on cloud-based ERP systems, check out this blog post.

On-Premises Implementation

Negotiate a Contract That Will Work in the Long-Term

If you decide to go with on-premise implementation, be sure your hardware contract reflects the current environment, where technology and data needs rapidly escalate. It doesn’t make sense to buy a huge machine or server on a long lease, because by the end of the lease, it’s almost certain to be outdated and too slow for your company’s needs. Negotiate a contract that will be nimble and reflect the current IT state.

Think About Your Size

Large companies often err on the side of over-investing in hardware to meet their IT needs, while small and midsize companies often underestimate their IT needs and accordingly under-invest in the hardware they need.

Take a long hard look at your needs. Is it reasonable to run business reporting on the same server that handles ERP transactions, or will that set you up for performance issues?

Think about not only your ERP demands now, but also what they may be in the future. When investing in your own hardware, you need to leave room to be able to scale up in the future.

By Aaron Continelli

When Will Women In Tech Become The Norm?

When Will Women In Tech Become The Norm?

Tech Diversity

It is well known that the technology industry has been dominated by men, but it is also clear that the industry is working to change that.

Diversity in the tech industry, especially where it applies to women in tech, has been a topic of discussion for years. Recently the Washington Technology Industry Association even released an infographic Tech Diversity Champions, designed to push the diversity issue into the spotlight.

Michael Schutzler, CEO at WTIA stated “The diversity gap is real in our tech community. We have a significant opportunity to bring untapped talent into the fold by joining a collective movement toward improving workplace diversity.” And while many organizations are implementing strategies to make the tech industry more inclusive, you have to wonder why it has taken us so long to get here.

With statistics that suggest that less than 25 percent of the tech jobs will be held by women by the end of 2016, and with 42% of women in tech more likely to leave the industry in their first year, it is critical that we are able to understand and make needed improvements to make the industry more inclusive and supportive of women in technology fields.

Women in tech often have to deal with an unwelcoming work environment, and sometimes even harassment. Their ideas are often ignored and their work diminished. Many women who leave the tech industry do so because of these issues. This is not to say that men are awful, or that all men are unfair to women, it is just the reality some women in tech face when trying to forge a career in this industry.

What can be done? First, women need to be confident in their skills and not be afraid to challenge the status quo. The more women demonstrate that they are as talented as their male counterparts, the better the odds that women in tech can find successful long lasting careers in the technology world.

Additionally, providing more training and educational opportunities for women in tech fields have proven beneficial in helping woman build confidence and skill. We also need to address the pay gap, and build a pay scale that is based on skill and not gender.

We also need to stop looking at women in tech as outsiders, and just see them as hard working dedicated professionals they are. When women in technology is the norm, then we have achieved success.

By  Jenny Kelley

Four Keys For Telecoms Competing In A Digital World

Four Keys For Telecoms Competing In A Digital World

Competing in a Digital World

Telecoms, otherwise largely known as Communications Service Providers (CSPs), have traditionally made the lion’s share of their revenue from providing pipes and infrastructure. Now CSPs face increased competition, not so much from each other, but with digital service providers (DSPs) like Netflix, Google, Amazon, Facebook, and Apple, all of whom leverage their networks to provide both new means of cheap, or free, communication, as well as content and applications.

As a result, CSPs are changing their business models so they look more like these DSPs, which focus on these types of services first, and the pipes second. In order to seize new opportunities in digital services, Over-the-Top (OTT), and IoT data monetization, a move to the cloud is essential.

Digital service providers have proverbially spoiled customers with instant-on provisioning for digital services, real-time account status, personalized recommendations, and hassle-free self-service options. Although CSPs are slowly acquiring these traits and starting to look a little more like their agile competitors, most still have a long way to go.

Here are a few things the smartest CSPs are doing to transform into DSPs:

1. Acquire Digital Dexterity

CSPs have to move a lot faster. Moving from hardware to cloud solutions helps them accelerate infrastructure upgrades by taking away the need for technician home visits. Unlike modern digital services that are tethered directly to the consumer, hardware like set top boxes (STBs) perpetuate the outdated notion of tethering instead to a physical address.

One example of a company moving with digital dexterity is Charter Communications with its Worldbox cloud-based TV service. Worldbox does most of its computing in the cloud, so new features can be rolled out in real time. This eliminates physical installations and allows rapid deployment, faster time-to-revenue, and happier customers.

2. Harness Consumption Data

Companies like Amazon and Netflix have mastered the art of using mountains of consumption data to gain unique insights into customer usage trends, behavior patterns, and preferences. They then use it to elevate customer service, provide highly personalized incentives, and adjust product catalogs. CSPs have to start following this model in order to stay competitive.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

The challenge? CSPs typically keep usage data in separate systems. Finance data goes to finance, billing data to billing, and so forth. In aggregate, this data is extremely valuable, but historically, CSPs have not analyzed it across all the silos. In a digital economy, they need to consider all data that is collected in order to better serve their customers and look for cross-sell and upsell opportunities, which ultimately build customer loyalty and grow incremental revenues.

3. Overhaul Legacy Operations and Business Systems

Perhaps the biggest challenge for CSPs is their reliance on outdated business systems. The operations support systems (OSS) and business support systems (BSS) used by many CSPs were designed for high-volume efficiency to support a limited set of services, such as voice calling and cable TV delivery, which are all bound primarily to a geographic location rather than a specific consumer. These systems were designed and implemented to handle heavy transaction volumes, but the downstream impact of the end-customer experience was an afterthought. In the age of machine-to-machine connectivity, IoT, and data-driven services, CSPs are not nimble or adaptable enough to stay competitive in today’s markets if they are relying on these systems alone.

With legacy OSS/BSS systems, bringing new products, packages, or even promotions to market requires coding and time-consuming IT intervention. In a world where the business and its consumers have come to expect change in days or even hours, even the most trivial changes can take months. These systems often lack real-time capabilities for fulfillment, provisioning, and customer self-service, and can’t easily support complex pricing schemes that merge subscriptions, usage, and one-time payments, or that involve third parties. These are big problems, but there is a workaround.

4. Rebuild Incrementally for New Business Innovation

OSS/BSS are intricate, multi-million dollar systems that touch virtually every aspect of a CSP’s business. But their most fundamental flaw is that changes to pricing, packaging, and behavior are implemented via changes to underlying code. Not only is this a purely engineering-focused approach to change costly and time consuming, it also guarantees the creation of a labyrinthine system disconnected from its original code base. This means that upgrading these behemoths can take years and cost millions more, all while the digital economy is shifting into high gear and passing them by. Building responsive systems is vital, as Gartner emphasized in a recent report : “Re-engineer the core IT, and create a new digital platform, adopting and instilling new methodologies to enable BUs to respond rapidly to capture market opportunities and deal with the high levels of uncertainty that are inherent in emerging digital ecosystems.”

There is an achievable path forward that’s much less painful than a wholesale “rip-and-replace” of current infrastructure. A viable alternative approach to replacing existing systems is adding on cloud-based solutions as an agility layer on top of the old behemoths. This layer becomes the starting point for quickly creating and managing critical OSS/BSS functions demanded by newer DSP products and services (recurring billing, packaging, bundling, subscription management, customer care, etc.), all while peacefully coexisting with the legacy system and providing the minimum amount of attention it requires to stay operational.

The power to create and change offerings is placed in the hands of business users rather than engineers, so they quickly iterate service pricing and packaging without completely disrupting or overhauling their existing infrastructure. More importantly, they can help CSPs shorten response times, improve customer service, and speed their time to market.

Most CSPs still have a lot to change before their DSP metamorphosis is complete. The good news is that as key enablers of our connected world, they’re in a prime position to cash in on the burgeoning monetization opportunities of the digital economy. While the paralysis many CSPs suffer from is understandable—given the shackles imposed on them by modes and systems that are now outdated— doing nothing is not a viable option.

By Tom Dibble

Edtech and Virtual Reality – Exciting Learning Environment

Edtech and Virtual Reality – Exciting Learning Environment

Customizing Edutech

Customized edtech learning solutions are becoming more commonplace as the education industry recognises their potential and begins transforming the traditional structures so as to incorporate innovative developments. From textbooks to tablets, chalkboards to virtual reality, edtech promises not only dynamic and exciting learning environments but better learning strategies and solutions.

Virtual Reality and Education

Potentially one of the next prodigious education tools, in the last few years virtual reality has made strides that have quickly moved it from the realm of sci-fi to an accepted part of mainstream technology. From expensive and feature-rich products to budget-friendly minimalist models, we’re exposed to headlined Oculus Rift loaded with sensors and providing a display for each eye along with integrated headphones, PlayStation VR accessorising the PS4 console, Samsung Gear VR supporting a smartphone rather than connecting to either PC or console, and Google Cardboard with its universal convenience supporting a wide range of smartphones and boasting minimal, often no, hardware costs.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Developers interested in the merging of virtual reality technology with education are exploring a wide range of paths, some focusing on its benefits to history through series which allow students to ‘jump right into’ historical moments and experience the events themselves, and others using simulation platforms to teach students practical skills through hands-on practice instead of relying on theoretical knowledge alone. Considering the dynamic people that virtual reality tends to attract, including game designers, artists and filmmakers, the combined industry of education and virtual reality has the potential to turn education into an exciting and progressive field.

Edutech in Developing Countries

On the other side of the spectrum, edtech is also tackling the far less glamorous challenge of bringing education to developing countries. One study into technology and education in Hyderabad, India, and the low-fee private school (LFPS) sector, with a combined research team from the Hyderabad Urban Lab, University of Massachusetts and New York University, explores how city-wide firms can contribute to tech-focused education solutions. The study notes, “Within Hyderabad, an extensive network of multinational corporations, private foundations, consultants, NGOs and local entrepreneurs are building what they term an ‘educational ecosystem’ to support the commercialisation of all aspects of education.” The presence of a strong IT industry means the setting is ideal for the development of a parallel edutech industry able to service schools in both the public and private sectors.

Suggests Sangeeta Kamat, co-author of the study from the University of Massachusetts, “Edu-solution companies try out their model in Hyderabad and then sell their product in other developing countries such as Africa, Nigeria where the target audience is the same (students from LFPS). International companies investing in the LFPS sector are looking at the bigger picture. Although the revenue model is not so strong in India, they know that the population in much higher in LFPS as compared to international schools.”

A Glittering Distraction?

Of course, there are some who believe technology’s place in education should be far more carefully considered and supervised, and a study at West Point has found that “students perform better academically when laptops and tablets are banned from the classroom.” According to this research, male students and students entering college with high GPAs are the most likely to suffer from distraction due to device interference. A few potential reasons have been suggested for the negative effects of laptops and tablets, including that digital note taking isn’t as effective as writing notes by hand. It’s also possible that the ways in which classes are taught need to be developed to suit the technology implemented, but we can’t discount the fact that technology introduces many, many new distractions that might simply be more enticing to students than the work at hand.

Like it or not, edtech is progressing, and our schools and universities will have to meet the challenges and embrace the rewards; a lot of elbow grease, along with the willingness to try, fail, adapt, and start again, and technology could be informing education in a host of beneficial ways.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Intel Looks For Cloud Segment Growth Rate To Accelerate

Intel Looks For Cloud Segment Growth Rate To Accelerate

Intel Corp (INTC.O) on Wednesday reported slower revenue growth at its data center business, which makes semiconductors used in high-end servers, overshadowing a better-than-expected quarterly profit.

Shares of the world’s largest chipmaker fell 3 percent in after-hours trading.

Hurt by weak demand from enterprises, revenue at the highly-profitable unit rose 5 percent to $4 billion, but lagged the previous quarter’s 9 percent increase and remained below Intel’s annual target of low double-digit growth.

As we enter the second half, we expect the enterprise segment of the business to stabilize and the cloud segment growth rate to accelerate,” Intel’s finance chief Stacy Smith said on a call with analysts.

Intel has been focusing on the unit and its operation that makes chips for Internet-connected devices, as it seeks to lower dependence on the slowing PC market that it once helped create…

Read Full Article Source: Reuters

How IoT and Travel Go Hand-in-Hand

How IoT and Travel Go Hand-in-Hand

IoT and Travel 

There is no question that the Internet of Things, or IoT, is here to stay. Just this year alone, Gartner predicts there will be around 6.4 billion connected things in use worldwide, with 5.5 million new things connected each day. By 2020, this figure will go up to approximately 20.8 billion.

IoT is transforming industries and sectors as we know it, from automotive to manufacturing to healthcare. But what about travel? How does it a play a role in one of the fastest growing global industries? It turns out that IoT is creating ample and exciting opportunities in the travel and hospitality industry.

Opportunities in the Aviation Sector

A number of airlines are experimenting with IoT, with over half investing in a number of IoT programs as they believe it will lead to improved passenger experience. So what does a connected world in aviation possibly look like? The opportunities are endless – it could give way to intelligent air cabins that can monitor a passenger’s temperature, and in turn alert a crew member to take a specific action. With increased sensors both on the ground level and in airplanes, passengers will have an increased sense of their surroundings, with the ability to track items like luggage or cargo.


One example of an airline already experimenting with IoT is UK-based budget airline, EasyJet. Last year in a press release, EasyJet announced that it was collaborating with a clothing company to create uniforms for its cabin crew embedded with sensors and LED lights. For crew members, the LED lights will help transmit information, such as flight information and destination. Jackets for its engineers will have microphones and built-in cameras, allowing engineers to receive assistance when diagnosing technical issues. The engineer uniforms will also be equipped with barometers and air quality sensors that can help engineers monitor their work environment.

The London City Airport is an example of an airport testing how IoT can transform its operations. In 2003, the airport was awarded a grant from the UK’s Technology Strategy Board to examine cross-technology networking. The project ran for a year and focused on three areas:

  1. Measuring passenger journeys – Using sensors, the flow pattern and volume of passengers were measured within an airport terminal.

  2. Asset tracking – With custom tracking devices, the movement and positions of airport equipment used to service flights were tracked.

  3. Offering location-based services to passengers – Using an app, specific notifications were sent to passengers specific to their flights and their known position in the airport.

Using these findings, the airport developed a real-time operational dashboard and an IoT solution to measure passenger journeys. The ultimate goal is to help plan for future resources and the necessary infrastructure to help deliver the quickest passenger journey times through the airport.

The Rise of Smart Hotels

Beyond the aviation industry, hotels are looking into IoT to help enhance the customer experience. Investment in IoT programs are apparent with some hotels experimenting with app-based keyless entries for hotel rooms, as well as connected minibars that can immediately detect a traveler’s section. Other notable upgrades include room control systems where guests can adjust in-room temperature and lighting using a smartphone or in-room tablet.

The Aloft Hotel in South Beach introduced Botler, the Robot Butler last year. If a guest needs any sort of amenity, Botler will come to the guest’s door with the particular item requested. After it is delivered, the guest can use Botler’s touch screen to rate their experience.

Machine-to-machine (M2M) technology is making its presence felt in a number of prominent hotel chains and luxury brands. The Hilton chain is another example that have rolled out some great futures via their mobile app. Using their app, guests are able to check in, request items to be delivered to their room, and get access to other areas of the property (such as the pool or gym).

The Internet of Things is offering the travel industry a wealth of opportunity. With connected devices, back-end operations for airlines, cruises, rental cars, hotels are being streamlined. At the same time, data being collected from these devices are allowing companies to deliver a more personalized experience to travelers and guests alike.

By Joya Scarlata

Experts Touting Hybrid IT As The Next Step

Experts Touting Hybrid IT As The Next Step

Going Hybrid

Cloud computing has provided us with exceptional flexibility along with more accessible and economical solutions. The introduction of hybrid cloud saw further advances through the management of multiple clouds from various providers, and experts are now touting hybrid IT as the next step.

Hybrid Cloud

Cloud-based services are divided into the categories of public and private, each with its own set of benefits and limitations. Public clouds such as Amazon Web Services and Google Cloud provide us with cost savings through their shared services, are typically easy to use, and are highly scalable. Private clouds, on the other hand, offer many benefits of cloud computing but are generally understood to be more secure and controllable since they are designed for use by only one organization. For some organizations, one of these two categories is easily recognized as the most suitable, but for many others, something in the middle provides just the right fit. Enter the hybrid cloud, an infrastructure that allows independently operating public and private clouds to communicate via encrypted connections. This combination model lets businesses manage particular IT resources themselves and outsource others to service providers, merging the individual parts into a tailored hybrid cloud.


(Infographic Source: CBS Interactive)

Offering the best of both public and private cloud, hybrid cloud solutions provide holistic IT applications that allow business and IT leaders to pick and choose the most relevant mechanisms. Moreover, by combining private cloud, public cloud, and dedicated services in one platform, breakdowns are minimized, and maximum component advantage and operation is attained. The cost savings of such a mixed model have also been recognized as essential benefits as overall IT costs drop through reduced IT ownership and the ability to make use of (and pay for) resources only when they’re needed. Furthermore, hybrid cloud solutions have the potential of addressing security and compliance concerns more efficiently wherein sensitive data can be stored on dedicated servers without losing the benefits of the high performance and scalability of the cloud.

Of course, hybrid cloud solutions also come with their own unique challenges. Although many of the public and hybrid solutions offer advanced security solutions, the perception that such platforms are vulnerable to privacy and security issues is still high since information transported across networks could potentially be interfered with. Furthermore, both hybrid and public cloud solutions tend not to suit situations in which data transfer is sensitive to latency and ping times such as the JMA supercomputer which is used to predict tsunamis and earthquakes, producing intensely time-critical predictions. Finally, the costs involved in hybrid solutions tend to be greater than public cloud services, and organizations with smaller IT budgets are often served satisfactorily through public cloud providers.

Hybrid IT

Hybrid IT demonstrates the continued development of IT infrastructure, creating unified frameworks out of mixes of private clouds, public clouds, legacy systems, and collocations. As organizations increasingly make use of global data centers, hybrid IT assists in the management of IT resources across numerous facilities and locations using APIs and organizational services that ensure an agile, practical, and connected infrastructure.


Already organizations habitually utilizing hybrid cloud solutions are considering, if not implementing, hybrid IT applications. Government and transportation sectors, in particular, find hybrid IT allows them to cater to dispersed users in rapidly changing arenas, but smaller organizations too are benefiting from ‘IT as a service’ through the multitude of adaptations hybrid IT offers. Thanks to the ability to retain legacy systems in a gradual infrastructure transformation, hybrid IT means businesses can appropriately utilize all resources in an efficient and connected infrastructure.

Says Lydia Leong, distinguished analyst in the IT Leaders group at Gartner, “Not everything can or should be cloud.” Hybrid IT could provide the middle ground that allows existing, non-cloudy IT infrastructures to operate alongside cloud applications, permitting measured migration over time.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Cloud Business Boosts Microsoft’s Quarterly Revenue, Shares Rise

Cloud Business Boosts Microsoft’s Quarterly Revenue, Shares Rise

Sharp growth in its commercial cloud computing business helped lift Microsoft Corp’s (MSFT.O) quarterly revenue above Wall Street’s expectations, sending the technology company’s shares up more than 4 percent in after-hours trading.

The new and growing cloud business – essentially selling computing services and storage in its data centers to corporate customers – is one of the priorities for Chief Executive Satya Nadella, who took the helm of the world’s largest software company in early 2014

Nadella has refocused the company on cloud and mobile in the face of stagnation in its traditional PC-based Windows business.

Only two companies are setting the tone of enterprise computing, Microsoft Azure and Amazon AWS,” said Trip Chowdhry, managing director of Global Equities Research, referring to Inc’s (AMZN.O) web services unit.

These are the only two initiators in the whole enterprise space that are going to see growth in excess of 80 percent year-over-year for at least two or three years.

Microsoft’s revenue in what it calls its “intelligent cloud” businesses, which includes the Azure cloud platform and server software, rose 7 percent to $6.7 billion…

Read Full Source: Reuters


CloudTweaks Comics
Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

Reuters News: Powerfull DDoS Knocks Out Several Large Scale Websites

DDoS Knocks Out Several Websites Cyber attacks targeting the internet infrastructure provider Dyn disrupted service on major sites such as Twitter and Spotify on Friday, mainly affecting users on the U.S. East Coast. It was not immediately clear who was responsible. Officials told Reuters that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Bureau…

Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms Above DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms, malware is the most common incident that security teams reported responding to in 2014, according to a recent survey from SANS Institute and late-stage security startup AlienVault. The average cost of a data breach? $3.5 million, or $145 per sensitive…

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Security, Security, Security!! Get use to it as we’ll be hearing more and more of this in the coming years. Collaborative security efforts from around the world must start as sometimes it feels there is a sense of Fait Accompli, that it’s simply too late to feel safe in this digital age. We may not…

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks!

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks!

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks! So we are all cheering as the FCC last week made the right choice in upholding the principle of net neutrality! For the general public it is a given that an ISP should be allowed to charge for bandwidth and Internet access but never to block or somehow…

Timeline of the Massive DDoS DYN Attacks

Timeline of the Massive DDoS DYN Attacks

DYN DDOS Timeline This morning at 7am ET a DDoS attack was launched at Dyn (the site is still down at the minute), an Internet infrastructure company whose headquarters are in New Hampshire. So far the attack has come in 2 waves, the first at 11.10 UTC and the second at around 16.00 UTC. So…

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

A New Era for Cyber Crime Last September, the website of a well-known security journalist was hit by a massive DDoS attack. The site’s host stated it was the largest attack of that type they had ever seen. Rather than originating at an identifiable location, the attack seemed to come from everywhere, and it seemed…

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

Botnets and DDoS Attacks There’s just so much that seems as though it could go wrong with closed-circuit television cameras, a.k.a. video surveillance. With an ever-increasing number of digital eyes on the average person at all times, people can hardly be blamed for feeling like they’re one misfortune away from joining the ranks of Don’t…

5 Things To Consider About Your Next Enterprise Sharing Solution

5 Things To Consider About Your Next Enterprise Sharing Solution

Enterprise File Sharing Solution Businesses have varying file sharing needs. Large, multi-regional businesses need to synchronize folders across a large number of sites, whereas small businesses may only need to support a handful of users in a single site. Construction or advertising firms require sharing and collaboration with very large (several Gigabytes) files. Financial services…

Why Security Practitioners Need To Apply The 80-20 Rules To Data Security

Why Security Practitioners Need To Apply The 80-20 Rules To Data Security

The 80-20 Rule For Security Practitioners  Everyday we learn about yet another egregious data security breach, exposure of customer data or misuse of data. It begs the question why in this 21st century, as a security industry we cannot seem to secure our most valuable data assets when technology has surpassed our expectations in other regards.…

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security It’s no secret many organizations rely on popular cloud providers like Amazon and Microsoft for access to computing infrastructure. The many perks of cloud services, such as the ability to quickly scale resources without the upfront cost of buying physical servers, have helped build a multibillion-dollar cloud industry that continues to grow each…

5% Of Companies Have Embraced The Digital Innovation Fostered By Cloud Computing

5% Of Companies Have Embraced The Digital Innovation Fostered By Cloud Computing

Embracing The Cloud We love the stories of big complacent industry leaders having their positions sledge hammered by nimble cloud-based competitors. chews up Oracle’s CRM business. Airbnb has a bigger market cap than Marriott. Amazon crushes Walmart (and pretty much every other retailer). We say: “How could they have not seen this coming?” But, more…

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap: What Is Your Core Strength?

The Security Gap You’re out of your mind if you think blocking access to file sharing services is filling a security gap. You’re out of your mind if you think making people jump through hoops like Citrix and VPNs to get at content is secure. You’re out of your mind if you think putting your…

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Revenue Imperatives “Follow the money” is always a good piece of advice, but in today’s recurring revenue-driven market, “follow the customer” may be more powerful. Two recurring revenue imperatives highlight the importance of responding to, and cherishing customer interactions. Technology and competitive advantage influence the final two. If you’re part of the movement towards recurring…

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Five Requirements for Supporting a Connected Workforce It used to be that enterprises dictated how workers spent their day: stuck in a cubicle, tied to an enterprise-mandated computer, an enterprise-mandated desk phone with mysterious buttons, and perhaps an enterprise-mandated mobile phone if they traveled. All that is history. Today, a modern workforce is dictating how…


Sponsored Partners