Category Archives: Cloud Computing

The Idiosyncrasies of Bitcoin and the BlockChain

The Idiosyncrasies of Bitcoin and the BlockChain

The ‘Centerless’ Economy

Have you ever wondered why certain coins have ridged edges? They are prevalent within the currencies of many nations. The mint actually calls it “reeding.” But what is it for? There was a time when the coins themselves were worth what they stood for; they were made from an amount of gold or silver equal to their face value. People discovered quickly that it was possible to shave a tiny sliver off the edge of each coin, slowly building up a tidy amount of stolen shaved silver or gold. Reeding took care of this problem by installing a ridged edge, which would give away any attempts to slice pieces away.

Fintech Economy Currency

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Although reeding has eliminated this form of financial fraud, its continued presence on some of our coins serves as a reminder that the modern monetary system is beset with challenges. There is a dynamic tension between the value of goods and the honesty of those performing the transactions. It has never been perfect, primarily because it is based on faith. In many regards it is quite amazing what people will do, based on the mutual acceptance of a fiat currency, or on the supposed legitimacy of a signature on a contract. This faith extends to the person across from you, the banks that handle and lend out money, and the governments that oversee it all. This is about to change.

Most people have heard about BitCoin, the “virtual currency” that seems to defy explanation as to how it works, and which seems to be the favored exchange medium of international criminals, drug lords and arms dealers. It appears as a novelty, doomed to obscurity due to a lack of cultural connection and consumer comfort. But there is a lesson that comes from the slow advance of BitCoin that all companies and individuals should heed, even if they never make a BitCoin transaction, and it comes down to one word: decentralization.

The Block Chain 

BitCoin is a payment system, not a currency per se. It belongs to no nation, and no government can legislate its value. The most significant feature of BitCoin is the machinery that makes it work, called the BlockChain, and that’s what enterprises and individuals must pay strict attention to.

(Bitcoin Explained via Duncan Elms)

The BlockChain is a collection of computers stationed around the world, and maintained by anybody. You or I could have a computer that connects to the BlockChain if we wanted. They essentially act like a group of peers, who must all be notified of every BitCoin transaction and must unanimously and independently verify and approve each one. They become the witnesses, and the value of every transaction completed is based no longer on faith but on fact.

The most important thing to take away from this, however, is that the BlockChain approval process does not only happen for BitCoin-based transactions. It can happen in any area of business or activity in which independent, impartial oversight is required.

Playing With Numbers And Formulas

Take accounting, for example. Accounting places much of its stock in trade in the balancing of books. Every dollar that a company takes in, spends and retains must balance out. That’s what a ledger is for, and that’s what accountants do. They make sure it all balances. But this is what the BlockChain does, too. It acts like a giant global ledger and insists that every transaction also balances.

Forumlas

This has huge implications for all types of businesses, including banking, accounting, insurance and real estate. It does not necessarily threaten to put them all out of business, but it does point to a significant change in the way transactions and contracts are negotiated and acted upon. The global approval systems established by the BlockChain will influence every area in which humans need to prove something. This could include certifications, diplomas and affidavit-type documents. Where once a signature sufficed, now the proof of a transaction will need to pass the test of a million unrelated and impartial computers. BitCoins and similar virtual payment systems can even be programmed to be spent only on certain products and services and no others. For example, an insurance company’s payout could include a BitCoin that can only be applied to specific medications or car repairs at a selection of approved suppliers. This has the potential to vastly improve the security of payouts and the efficacy of systems that rely on money to be spent exactly where it should be.

The mechanics of how BlockChain does what it does take much more space to explain, in just the same way modern banking or insurance structures do. But for businesses, consumers and employees in today’s workforce, the notion of a secure, “centerless” place for the verified exchange of goods, services and promises is moving ever closer.

Bottom line (to use an accountant’s terminology), if you have considered BitCoin to be merely a quirky virtual coinage system available only to technology buffs, think again. Your next house purchase, employment agreement or company audit may run on this new, centerless track very soon.

For more on this topic, please visit businessvalueexchange.com, sponsored by Hewlett Packard Enterprise.

By Steve Prentice

The Google Virtual Reality Expedition Program

The Google Virtual Reality Expedition Program

Virtual Reality Expedition – From Antarctica To Mars

Google’s Expeditions Pioneer Program was launched earlier this year, providing students with the use of virtual reality in their classrooms through Google’s Cardboard VR viewer. The rollout of expeditions kits, complete with ASUS smartphones, a tablet for teachers, a router for device connection, and either Google Cardboard or Mattel View-Master VR viewers began in September, targeting select schools in the U.S., and the program is now being expanded to more cities and countries.

Explore

To date, over 100,000 students have used Expeditions to explore more than 120 locations ranging from Antarctica to rainforests, Mars to the Acropolis, and the Great Barrier Reef to the Great Wall of China. The virtual reality platform developed and designed specifically for the classroom immerses students in new experiences through guided tours to places their school buses couldn’t navigate. And annotated points of interest and ambient sound provide additional cues for a broad range of lesson integration. Says Jennifer Holland, program manager for Google’s education apps, “These teachers can bring abstract concepts to life. Imagine learning math by calculating the number of bricks it took to build the Great Wall of China.”

Additionally, Expeditions encourages inclusion, allowing many students who might not otherwise have shared in a field trip due to financial or physical constraints the chance to take part. It’s hoped that in time users will be able to further immerse themselves in these virtual realities, manipulating and exploring new environments for a greater learning experience, though at the outset it’s primarily necessary to build teachers’ understanding of how to effectively include the tool in daily lesson plans for enriched learning experiences.

The Package

Starting at around $20, Google’s cardboard viewing boxes wrap around a smartphone which users hold to their faces for an immersive experience that integrates images from Google Earth, Street View, and 360° footage from Jump cameras. At this stage, developers are gathering feedback from students and teachers before releasing the Expedition app that will be available on all devices purchased by schools. States Holland, “One of the key things we’ve heard from teachers is they really wanted to find a way to engage their students meaningfully and find that hook to inspire and get kids excited about learning.

One Teacher’s Experience

Cathy Chau, an educational technology specialist at Trevor Day School in New York, NY, blogged about her experience of Google’s Expeditions Pioneer Program. Says Chau, “Classes took field trips to Athens, the Galapagos Islands, the Great Barrier Reef, Spain, Brazil, Dubai, visited six biomes in a single day, the Moon, Mars, and even experienced what it would be like to be a Museum Photographer!” Of the tech, Chau explains that the Teacher Dashboard provides facts about each panorama, points of interest, and questions about the current landscape, and a smiley face shows the teacher what each student is viewing. She comments, “I think it’s going to provide so many opportunities for students and teachers, and will really ignite teachers’ creativity in lesson design!

Teachers interested in taking advantage of the Expeditions Pioneer Program can sign up here.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Google Introduces New Machine Learning System – TensorFlow

Google Introduces New Machine Learning System – TensorFlow

Google Introduces Open Source Machine Learning System 

So we’ve built an entirely new machine learning system, which we call “TensorFlow.” TensorFlow is faster, smarter, and more flexible than our old system, so it can be adapted much more easily to new products and research. It’s a highly scalable machine learning system—it can run on a single smartphone or across thousands of computers in datacenters. We use TensorFlow for everything from speech recognition in the Google app, to Smart Reply in Inbox, to search in Google Photos. It allows us to build and train neural nets up to five times faster than our first-generation system, so we can use it to improve our products much more quickly…

Read Full Article: Google Blog

Wearable Technology Inches Even Closer To Being The Norm

Wearable Technology Inches Even Closer To Being The Norm

Wearable Technology Mainstream

Wearable technology is inching ever closer to going mainstream with the launch of a number of new smartwatches from various high-end brands and a groundbreaking conference in Toronto called the Wearable Entertainment & Sports conference.

Upstart smartwatch company Pebble launched its latest product, a new smartwatch called the Pebble Time Round. First reviews of the watch have been complimentary, particularly with regard to the look and feel of the device. Mashable product analyst Richard Wong is calling it “a modern take on the Swatch watch….The thin design (even with its large bezel) and narrow leather band make this arguably the most watch-like smartwatch we’ve seen.”

The Pebble launch was followed in quick succession by fashion brand Fossil announcing its first android-enabled smartwatch called the Fossil Q Founder – a smartwatch ‘born out of a partnership between Intel and Fossil’, while renowned watchmaker TAG Heuer launches the Carrera Connected smartwatch in New York with a price tag of $1500, and claims it will have ‘almost the same functions as an Apple Watch’ according to tech blog 9 to 5 Mac.

Wearable-Technology

(Infographic Source: Raconteur

Yet the wearables market, and in particular, smartwatches are still waiting for that one breakout product that changes everything. The launch of the Apple Watch made consumers everywhere aware of the new category of products that are arriving, yet the price and availability has prevented the product from going totally mainstream. Still, that hasn’t stopped other watchmakers from jumping into the new tech category.

Of course, it’s not just the fashion industry where wearables are making an impact. A fascinating ethical conversation took place at the Wearable Entertainment & Sports conference, with regard to the ‘big data’ that is collected from professional athletes.

While companies like Fitbit and Garmin monitor basic information about performance, there is a whole new generation of gadgets about to hit the market that will be measuring almost everything an athlete is doing at any given time. “Montreal-based Hykso, for example, is developing sensors about the size of a watch face that sits in a boxer’s hand wraps to feedback real-time data about speed, power and technique,” reports The Star.

The question needs to be asked: at what point is the data collecting from wearable technology infringing on an athlete’s right to privacy. Where do you draw the line?

As the National Post reported it: “Data could in theory be used with only the player’s best interests in mind, [but] it could also be used to bring the hammer at contract time: It says here you were 3 km/h slower in the last month of the season, son, and historical data shows that this predicts a drop off in production the following season. Thus, please accept this 25% reduction in your compensation.”

Nevertheless, it seems that the genie is well and truly out of the box with this one, and it’s only a matter of time before wearables become embedded in the mainstream. Conference organizer Tom Emrich told The Star online that ‘’sports are one of the more obvious areas where wearables can improve efficiency and productivity, yet the same principles can be applied to industrial applications such as monitoring the health of employees working in dangerous conditions or providing direct contact with employees working in the field.”

By Jeremy Daniel

7 Common Cloud Security Missteps

7 Common Cloud Security Missteps

Cloud Security Missteps

Cloud computing remains shrouded in mystery for the average American. The most common sentiment is, “It’s not secure.” Few realize how many cloud applications they access every day: Facebook, Gmail, Uber, Evernote, Venmo, and the list goes on and on… People flock to cloud services for convenient solutions to everyday tasks. They are so easy to start using that consumers rarely think twice about setting up an account or downloading a new app.

Regardless of whether you acknowledge it, cloud usage incurs risk to your personal information. The data breaches in the news have much worse repercussions than just the need to reset your password. Cloud usage from your phone or computer may expose your data to criminal hackers who sell the information on the black market, or Darkweb.

cloud-security-tips

Of course, no one advocates for avoiding cloud use altogether – an attitude analogous to keeping money safe (but idle) under your mattress. Cloud services enable a brave new world of productivity and convenience, and consumers and businesses should take full advantage of these benefits. At the same time, you should be aware of common threats and take steps to minimize the risk that a wrong click leads to a fraudulent charge call with your credit card company.

A recent trend in the cybersecurity industry has removed the “blame” of security failures from technology users and shifted the focus to making security easy. With that in mind, there are simple choices people make online that affect the likelihood of becoming a victim to cybercrime. You don’t have to be a security engineer to beat the vast majority of hacking attempts.

Take heed of these common cyber security pitfalls:

1. Misstep: You lost control of your data because of the fine print in a user agreement. Solution: Many cloud services claim ownership of any uploaded data, even after you delete your account. These tricky rules are hidden in plain sight in the terms and conditions. Companies don’t expect you to read all the fine print, and I don’t either. 15 seconds of online research can go a long way before using a new cloud service. Google, “_______ shady user agreement.”

2. Misstep: You sent out a public link to a Google Doc so others could view and edit.

Solution: Creating a public link is a convenient way to share a common document, but this means literally anyone who guesses the link can view the document. You may not care about your grocery list getting loose on the internet, but even documents like a party-planning sheet may have your address or other information you want to keep private. To restrict access, invite email addresses instead.

3. Misstep: You’re a celebrity and had private information leaked from your iCloud.

Solution: This is the famous celebrity nude photo catastrophe. Attackers correctly entered their victims’ passwords, either by brute force (multiple guessing attempts) or with previously stolen passwords. You may not be a famous model, but hackers commonly rely on this same method to steal information from any given application.

iCloud, the service provider in this case, is not necessarily insecure, since attackers gained access in the same way the account owners do. It’s the user’s responsibility to confirm their identity, and sometimes a password alone doesn’t suffice. Multi-factor authentication can almost always prevent this type of attack and is a key measure for any service with sensitive information. You can follow these directions to set up two-factor verification for iCloud.

AloneTime(FP)-02

4. Misstep: You use the same password for every app on your phone.

Solution: The previous tip discussed how attackers can gain access to your sensitive information by guessing or using a stolen password. Don’t make it easy for them! If you use the same password for all online services, a breach at Twitter may give attackers entrance into your bank, Amazon, and corporate email accounts. Use a password manager to minimize the damage in the event a single service gets breached.

5. Misstep: Web trackers are storing information on the sites you visit online.

Solution: Just like any hunter, knowing where you like to go online helps hackers target and execute attacks. Visiting just a few web pages can attract nearly 50 different tracking services. Many web trackers are useful for the services you use, but they can also pose a security and privacy liability. Services like Ghostery let you selectively choose who can track you, so only sites you trust receive your information.

6. Misstep: You granted an application every permission under the sun.

Solution: Applications request authorization for device permissions, but sometimes these can overstep boundaries. Be discerning when services seem to overstep their bounds by requesting access to contacts or even your camera, for example. These permissions can cost you money by making phone calls, violate privacy, or make a malicious attack more dangerous. Look out for permissions that seem unnecessary for the application’s function.

7. Misstep: A small mobile app startup you know nothing about has access to your banking data.

Solution: Your bank spends hundreds of millions of dollars on protecting your account, but that brand new financial app may not implement the same level of security. When you give a service full access to your financial information, you’re essentially circumventing your bank’s security. Keep your bank account secure by applying the tips above to any financial app you use. You should also limit access to only the necessary services, some of which ask for more permissions. A good rule of thumb is to be extra discerning of any service that requires you to enter your online banking password within the app. On the other hand, services that send you back to your banking app to authenticate don’t have as much control.

The Bottom Line: Don’t be afraid of the cloud. On the contrary, the typical user is probably better off storing even sensitive information in the cloud. The human is almost always the weak link in security. Cloud services are designed to be easy to use, security features included. When you store data in the cloud, someone can’t get your information just by stealing your computer or phone. And it’s a lot easier to implement multi-factor authentication and encryption on a cloud service than on your own personal device. Plus, you get to take advantage of all the convenience and mobility of cloud. So enjoy those apps, but take a few extra minutes to reduce the risk that a cybercriminal will ruin your week.

By Harold Byun

Local Motors To Sell World’s First 3D-Printed Electric Car

Local Motors To Sell World’s First 3D-Printed Electric Car

3D-Printed Electric Car

Local Motors, a low-volume car manufacturing company based in Phoenix Arizona, announced plans to sell the world’s first 3D-printed electric car in 2017, ratifying the promise of additive manufacturing, a process used to synthesize three-dimensional objects, also known as 3D printing. The LM3D Swim is the company’s first 3D-printed car for the consumer market. Last year, Local Motors displayed a prototype vehicle, calling it the Strati 3D car, which took 44 hours to print.

Designed by Portland-based artist, Kevin Lo, the LM3D Swim has a beach buggy design that emanates a fun and playful aesthetic. It has a bright red color, and features outward-facing speakers at the sides, although Local Motors decided to omit them for fear of disturbing the crowd. Suppose you don’t like the beach buggy design, the company is planning to release a Sport model. What is interesting here is that you can swap the Swim chassis with the Sport frame, without replacing the underside hull.

This means you can buy the Swim model and replace its chassis later with a Sport framework, giving you limitless possibilities, thanks to the wonders of 3D printing. Local Motors believes in “form over function,” so it wants its cars to look different while using the same platform—a body made of 80 percent ABS plastic and 20 percent carbon fiber materials. For now, around 75 percent of the LM3D will be 3D-printed, however, the goal is to print 90 percent of the car, the company said.

Companies Racing To The Printing Line

3D Printing

Local Motors also collaborated with IBM to integrate IoT technology using its IBM Watson, a supercomputer, into the 3D-printed car. The company also tapped Siemens for its Solid Edge CAD modeling, IDEO to renew the Local Motors Labs, and SABIC to improve the quality of the materials used. The company expects to complete all necessary certifications by the end of 2016 and exceed Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards by 2017.
Unlike traditional cars, which could take years to design and manufacture, the LM3D 3D-printed car takes only two months to complete, from design to prototype, Local Motors claims. Moreover, with companies like Google, Tesla, General Motors, Apple and most recently, Toyota are racing to get their respective electric and autonomous cars to the public, Local Motors is in the right direction. The LM3D series will be available for purchase in late 2016 for roughly $53,000.

The expected delivery date will be sometime in 2017…

By Gene Briones

Toyota Invests $1 Billion In Futuristic Cars

Toyota Invests $1 Billion In Futuristic Cars

TOKYO (AP) — Toyota is investing $1 billion in a research company it’s setting up in Silicon Valley to develop artificial intelligence and robotics, underlining the Japanese automaker’s determination to lead in futuristic cars that drive themselves and apply the technology to other areas of daily life.

Toyota Motor Corp. President Akio Toyoda said Friday the company will start operating from January 2016, with 200 employees at a Silicon Valley facility near Stanford University. A second facility will be established near Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge.

The investment, which will be spread over five years, comes on top of $50 million Toyota announced earlier for artificial intelligence research at Stanford and MIT.

Toyota said its interest extended beyond autonomous driving, which is starting to be offered by some automakers and being promised by almost all of them. The technology was pointing to a new industry for everyday use, delivering a safer lifestyle overall, it said…

Read Full Article: Associated Press

How To Overcome Data Insecurity In The Cloud

How To Overcome Data Insecurity In The Cloud

Data Insecurity In The Cloud

Today’s escalating attacks, vulnerabilities, breaches, and losses have cut deeply across organizations and captured the attention of, regulators, investors and most importantly customers. In many cases such incidents have completely eroded customer trust in a company, its services and its employees. The challenge of ensuring data security is far more complicated across public cloud models where there is shared ownership. As key business stakeholders in your company can you attest to who has access to your data in the public cloud models you use and most importantly that your customer’s data has not been tampered with, corrupted, or leaked?

The New Data Economy

data-economy

We are moving towards a data economy, where data is a core component of the value of the service or product that is delivered to the customer. In our hyper-connected world data streams are becoming far more personal and intimate than previously. Consider a connected bathroom scale where weight loss or gain patterns might be transmitted from a scale to a backend cloud and where as part of the product, customers have the ability to study their weight patterns over periods of time.

Despite a widespread recognition in the industry of the value and importance of customer data, we live in a perpetual state of data insecurity. It’s not only about the high profile data breaches but it’s also about minimizing accidental risk vectors. In the cloud well intentioned employees who don’t consider the ramifications of oversharing on social media sites, or who accidentally drag and drop sensitive documents from their desktops into email or who upload regulated data into insecure file shares to avoid corporate security measures may be your organization’s biggest risk vector.

Internal Data Marketplace

data-marketplace

At the CloudExpo Asia conference last week I referred to the sliver lining in the data insecurity issue. The effects of data loss, misuse and leakage are driving a very necessary change across the business landscape and executives are beginning to get educated on data security issues.

Following are three key steps I recommend to executives as they look to beef up their data security programs with a lens on public cloud

1. Build an internal data marketplace: Organizations need to know the value of their data in order to make the right decisions about whether to host or transact their data in a particular cloud model, and thereafter how to protect it. To calculate the value of data, build an internal marketplace with user entitlements and access controls mapped accordingly. This encourages business users to treat data as part of the business P&L.

2. Learn from your data insecurity history: Organizations have a tendency to want to bury the past especially when it hasn’t been stellar. However, knowing how data has been used and abused in the past is an indicator of how it might be compromised and disclosed in the future. Studying loss trends over time can help organizations forecast future losses and improve prevention and mitigation strategies.

3. Make data protection business-consumable: This is a recurring theme in my writings. As business leaders rush to adopt new cloud applications security needs to partner much more strategically. The way that security classifies and treats data has to align to business and usage contexts. It’s protecting data, transactions and workstreams versus focusing only on building secure and compliant infrastructures that will help organizations win and retain customer trust in the long run.

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

By Evelyn de Souza

CloudTweaks Comics
4 Different Types of Attacks – Understanding the “Insider Threat”

4 Different Types of Attacks – Understanding the “Insider Threat”

Understanding the “Insider Threat”  The revelations that last month’s Sony hack was likely caused by a disgruntled former employee have put a renewed spotlight on the insider threat. The insider threat first received attention after Edward Snowden began to release all sorts of confidential information regarding national security. While many called him a hero, what…

Cloud Computing Then & Now

Cloud Computing Then & Now

The Evolving Cloud  From as early as the onset of modern computing, the possibility of resource distribution has been explored. Today’s cloud computing environment goes well beyond what most could even have imagined at the birth of modern computing and innovation in the field isn’t slowing. A Brief History Matillion’s interactive timeline of cloud begins…

How Big Data Is Influencing Web Design

How Big Data Is Influencing Web Design

How Big Data Is Influencing Web Design For all you non-techies… You’re probably wondering what big data is (I know I was….a few years back) so let’s get the definitions out of the way so we’re on the same page, okay? Big data is A LOT of data – really, it is. It is a…

The Future of M2M Technology & Opportunities

The Future of M2M Technology & Opportunities

The Future Of The Emerging M2M Here at CloudTweaks, most of our coverage is centered around the growing number of exciting and interconnected emerging markets. Wearable, IoT, M2M, Mobile and Cloud computing to name a few. Over the past couple of weeks we’ve talked about Machine to Machine (M2M) such as the differences between IoT and…

Cloud Infographic: IoT For Automotive Deconstructed

Cloud Infographic: IoT For Automotive Deconstructed

IoT For Automotive Deconstructed The IoT automotive industry is moving rapidly with many exciting growth opportunities available. We’ve written about some of the risks and benefits as well as some of the players involved. One thing for certain as that the auto industry is starting to take notice and we can expect the implementation of a…

The Monstrous IoT Connected Cloud Market

The Monstrous IoT Connected Cloud Market

What’s Missing in the IoT? While the Internet of Things has become a popular concept among tech crowds, the consumer IoT remains fragmented. Top companies continue to battle to decide who will be the epicenter of the smart home of the future, creating separate ecosystems (like the iOS and Android smartphone market) in their wake.…

Who’s Who In The Booming World Of Data Science

Who’s Who In The Booming World Of Data Science

The World of Data Science The nature of work and business in today’s super-connected world means that every second of every day, the world produces an astonishing amount of data. Consider some of these statistics; every minute, Facebook users share nearly 2.5 million pieces of content, YouTube users upload over 72 hours of content, Apple…

Big Data and Financial Services – Security Threat or Massive Opportunity?

Big Data and Financial Services – Security Threat or Massive Opportunity?

Big Data and Financial Services Cloud Banking Insights Series focuses on big data in the financial services industry and whether it is a security threat or actually a massive opportunity. How does big data fit into an overall cloud strategy? Most FI’s have a positive mind-set towards cloud IT consumption as it not only enables…

Cloud Computing Services Perfect For Your Startup

Cloud Computing Services Perfect For Your Startup

Cloud Computing Services Chances are if you’re working for a startup or smaller company, you don’t have a robust IT department. You’d be lucky to even have a couple IT specialists. It’s not that smaller companies are ignoring the value and importance of IT, but with limited resources, they can’t afford to focus on anything…

The CloudTweaks Archive - Posted by
Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Moving Your Email To The Cloud? Beware Of Unintentional Data Spoliation!

Cloud Email Migration In today’s litigious society, preserving your company’s data is a must if you (and your legal team) want to avoid hefty fines for data spoliation. But what about when you move to the cloud? Of course, you’ve probably thought of this already. You’ll have a migration strategy in place and you’ll carefully…

The Importance of Cloud Backups: Guarding Your Data Against Hackers

The Importance of Cloud Backups: Guarding Your Data Against Hackers

The Importance of Cloud Backups Cloud platforms have become a necessary part of modern business with the benefits far outweighing the risks. However, the risks are real and account for billions of dollars in losses across the globe per year. If you’ve been hacked, you’re not alone. Here are some other companies in the past…

Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

There is a Difference – So Stop Comparing We are all familiar with the old saying “That’s like comparing apples to oranges” and though we learned this lesson during our early years we somehow seem to discount this idiom when discussing the Cloud. Specifically, IT buyers often feel justified when comparing the cost of a…

How To Overcome Data Insecurity In The Cloud

How To Overcome Data Insecurity In The Cloud

Data Insecurity In The Cloud Today’s escalating attacks, vulnerabilities, breaches, and losses have cut deeply across organizations and captured the attention of, regulators, investors and most importantly customers. In many cases such incidents have completely eroded customer trust in a company, its services and its employees. The challenge of ensuring data security is far more…

How To Humanize Your Data (And Why You Need To)

How To Humanize Your Data (And Why You Need To)

How To Humanize Your Data The modern enterprise is digital. It relies on accurate and timely data to support the information and process needs of its workforce and its customers. However, data suffers from a likability crisis. It’s as essential to us as oxygen, but because we don’t see it, we take it for granted.…

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security It’s no secret many organizations rely on popular cloud providers like Amazon and Microsoft for access to computing infrastructure. The many perks of cloud services, such as the ability to quickly scale resources without the upfront cost of buying physical servers, have helped build a multibillion-dollar cloud industry that continues to grow each…

Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

The True Meaning of Availability What is real availability? In our line of work, cloud service providers approach availability from the inside out. And in many cases, some never make it past their own front door given how challenging it is to keep the lights on at home let alone factors that are out of…

5% Of Companies Have Embraced The Digital Innovation Fostered By Cloud Computing

5% Of Companies Have Embraced The Digital Innovation Fostered By Cloud Computing

Embracing The Cloud We love the stories of big complacent industry leaders having their positions sledge hammered by nimble cloud-based competitors. Saleforce.com chews up Oracle’s CRM business. Airbnb has a bigger market cap than Marriott. Amazon crushes Walmart (and pretty much every other retailer). We say: “How could they have not seen this coming?” But, more…