Category Archives: Popular

Cloud Computing Then & Now

Cloud Computing Then & Now

The Evolving Cloud 

From as early as the onset of modern computing, the possibility of resource distribution has been explored. Today’s cloud computing environment goes well beyond what most could even have imagined at the birth of modern computing and innovation in the field isn’t slowing.

A Brief History

Matillion’s interactive timeline of cloud begins with the first stored-program computer, the Manchester Baby, developed in 1947. Quickly, time sharing became necessary as the 250 computers available in 1955 were rented to users in efforts to ensure as little downtime as possible. When packet switching was introduced in 1960, the foundation for resource sharing and the internet was laid and shortly thereafter, in a speech at MIT, John McCarthy suggested that computer resources would one day be shared like any other service.

cloud-past-future

Through the ‘70s, ‘80s, and ‘90s, the world saw the development of the internet and mainstreaming of computers, and in 1996 the term cloud computing was first used by George Favaloro and Sean O’Sullivan, executives at Compaq Computer. During the 2000s mobile and smartphone technology took off and very quickly access to the cloud was common. Of course, the last five years have seen the greatest advances in cloud computing, as seemingly with all technology, it develops exponentially. Global giants such as Amazon, Google, and Apple rely heavily on the cloud, and in 2013 it was estimated global spending on cloud services reached $47 billion.

The Evolution

From digital assistants to smart cars to virtual reality to the internet of things, all of the latest modernizations rely on cloud technology. But so too do most of the traditional services individuals and organizations rely on. Although we’ve seen new products and services focused on managing money, the traditional banking institutions are developing their own services and the environment is nearly unrecognizable to that of ten years ago. Who can even imagine a world without internet banking?

banking-vault

Healthcare similarly has advanced, and not only in the laboratories and offices of pioneering doctors and scientists. Large hospital and patient management institutions are taking up the reigns and following suit, albeit more slowly, and patient care programs are being implemented to combine the benefits of modern devices such as wearables with healthcare regimens. Already two years ago, an HIMSS Analytics survey of cloud adoption in healthcare organizations found 83% of those surveyed were using cloud services. Common uses included the hosting of clinical applications and data, health information exchange, and backup and data recovery.

And the benefits cloud computing promises education are immense. Already, cloud technology is changing the way students learn and extending access to schooling into remote and impoverished areas. Though schools and universities are adopting cloud technologies themselves, many startups such as Education Modified, Kiko Labs, and HSTRY, are coming up with new methods and platforms which enhance and further learning.

Into the Future

It’s predicted that the cloud service market will be worth around $108 billion next year, and by 2020 the number of connected devices worldwide is expected to reach 25 billion. Further estimates suggest cloud computing offers green benefits too, and US organizations moving to the cloud before 2020 will save $12.3 billion in energy costs. Gartner points to a hybrid cloud infrastructure in the coming years, and says Ed Anderson, “I start to think of a multi-cloud environment as a foundation for a next wave of applications.” And according to Forrester Research, we’re on the cusp of the second wave of cloud computing, with service providers focused on next-gen applications that require omnichannel support, time-based analytics, and micro service support. The barrier to entering the cloud seems likely to shrink significantly due to adjusted compliance requirements and regulations, and although security already is a primary focus, with the expansion of cloud, its importance will be magnified. Finally, due to the high demand for cloud services, service providers will soon, if not already, be building next-generation architecture on hyper-converged platforms further reducing maintenance costs and speeding up scalability.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

There is a Difference – So Stop Comparing

We are all familiar with the old saying “That’s like comparing apples to oranges” and though we learned this lesson during our early years we somehow seem to discount this idiom when discussing the Cloud. Specifically, IT buyers often feel justified when comparing the cost of a Cloud IaaS or SaaS provider with that of a Cloud-Enabled Hosting Provider. These types of providers are very different and while each services a particular need effectively and efficiently; by no means should their solutions be compared from a price perspective. A simple illustration is when the costs of Azure or AWS are compared with those of a true Cloud-Enabled Hosting Provider.

cloudtweaks-comic

As defined by Gartner “cloud compute IaaS is defined as a standardized, highly automated offering, where compute resources, complemented by storage and networking capabilities, are owned by a service provider and offered to the customer on demand. The resources are scalable and elastic in near real time, and metered by use…” Leaders in the space are the familiar names such as Azure and AWS. By contrast, Cloud-Enabled Hosting brings cloudlike consumption and provisioning attributes to the traditional managed hosting market. It represents an evolution of a mature market, in which the wide variety of offerings and capabilities means vendors must be chosen with care and diligence.

When buyers compare the prices from Azure or AWS to proposals from a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider, they immediately jump to the conclusion that Azure or AWS is cheaper. Most professionals, including myself, may skip the proposal pages and jump straight to the last page which is the pricing page which results in basing a potential decision purely on pricing. Cloud-enabled managed service providers will always be higher cost but that is due to the fact they offer a more comprehensive solution. These solutions not only offers the IaaS component but also the layered services on top of that hardware to manage and monitor those assets on a 24*7 basis. This greatly increases the value provided by the Cloud-Enable Hosting Providers and thus the cost.

Today, many of these Public Cloud Providers offer more than just IaaS. In many cases, a myriad of applications are delivered in a SaaS model which offers a compelling solution to the traditional buy and build on-site philosophy. I strongly encourage IT to evaluate and embrace these solutions when appropriate as a tangible return on investment is often to be gained.

Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider

(Image Source: Shutterstock)

The following questions will help determine which solutions may best align with your IT strategy and enable you to identify if IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider is the correct path to follow. Once this is determined, pricing of “apples to apples” can be requested and correctly compared.

Are you looking to get out of the hardware business or looking to outsource? If the business strategy gravitates towards getting out of buying and supporting new hardware, then an IaaS provider may be the solution. If instead the business driver is also to eliminate in-house support, management and patching of servers then a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider is the better choice.

When the need arises, does your IT team seek a turnkey solutions or do they have the time, skill and knowledge to develop, implement and manage their own solutions? If the goal is turnkey, then a Cloud-Enabled Hosting Provider will be the right choice. If you prefer to do it yourself then a Cloud Provider IaaS or SaaS solution may fit well.

So, in no way am I diminishing the Public Cloud Providers that offer compelling solutions. My point is merely that when looking for more than an IaaS or SaaS solution, because business needs require a turnkey solution with fully integrated managed services, then a Cloud-Enable Managed Hosting Provider may better address your needs. As a result, the full scope of services delivered is more comprehensive than those supplied in an IaaS solution so the cost should be evaluated in light of that difference.

By Marc Maliazia

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart  Breaches

Formal verification is not a new concept. In a nutshell, the process uses sophisticated math to prove or disprove whether a system achieves its desired functional specifications. It is employed by organizations that build products that absolutely cannot fail. One of the reasons NASA rovers are still roaming Mars years after their intended lifespan is because the correctness of their software was mathematically verified before deployment. Similar trusted 24/7/365 technology is embedded into mission-critical airplane flight controls, medical devices, and military defense systems that are too important to malfunction.

Recently, a team of computer science professors and Ph.D. students in the EnterpriseWorks incubator at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) discovered how that same methodology can be applied to bulletproof today’s most complex networks to help prevent change-induced outages and breaches. Mathematical network verification is long overdue. Even if only 2% of modifications to a network’s configuration result in a change-induced outage or vulnerability, let’s put that in perspective: would you board an airplane if you knew that two out of 100 planes could fall out of the sky? Of course not. Why should we expect less from our networks? With so much sensitive data at stake, networks have to be as trustworthy as mission-critical systems and infrastructure.

Why Networks Fail

network

Four key factors have made network infrastructure particularly vulnerable to breaches and outages. First, when you factor in the cloud, virtualization, the move to software-defined networks (SDN), and mobile and IoT devices, you’ll quickly see that networks have become incredibly complex to manage. Second, every network change leaves an opening for something to possibly be misconfigured. By some estimates, operators of large enterprise or service provider networks make approximately 1,000 changes per month. Third, humans are a constant and unpredictable factor. Gartner analyst Donna Scott has noted that “80 percent of unplanned downtime is caused by people and process issues, including poor change management practices, while the remainder is caused by technology failures and disasters.”

And finally, there is poor policy management. According to the consulting firm Protiviti, one out of three enterprises and service providers lacks policies for IT, information security and data encryption, while 71 percent lack critical knowledge of which policies to institute to mitigate vulnerabilities and disruption. The fact is, most enterprises do not know what their network actually looks like at the deep infrastructure level, whether it is operating as it should be, and what vulnerabilities are lurking in the network. As a result, making any change to the network – even a day-to-day modification like changing access control rules or adding a device – is a time-consuming, manual and risky process. And broad architectural changes such as moving to a hybrid cloud or deploying SDN can be daunting projects.

How Formal Verification Works

Formal verification tries to predict the future: will my design work when I deploy it in the field? Will it always work, no matter what unexpected inputs or attacks are thrown at it? For example, a software application designer might want to know that her code will never crash or that it will never execute certain functions without an authorized login. These are simple, practical questions – but answering them is computationally challenging because of the enormous number of possible ways code may be executed, depending on the inputs and environments it interacts with. Decades of research advances in formal verification algorithms have led to the ability to rigorously answer such questions for certain kinds of software and critical systems.

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(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Can we understand the behavior of complex enterprises with the same mathematical rigor? In a network, we want to understand whether the design meets network-wide data-flow policy: Is my network correctly segmented to protect against lateral movement by attackers inside my perimeter? Will my web services be available even after a router interface failure? Today, these questions are addressed through manual spot-checks, auditing and change-review boards that might take weeks to provide answers, all of which still leave plenty of room for error. In contrast, mathematical network verification reasons automatically about the possible behaviors of the network.

Achieving that analysis required several innovations:

  • First, it required rigorous understanding of devices’ data-flow behavior, down to the data plane instructions, which are the “machine code” of the network.
  • Second, it required sophisticated, novel reasoning algorithms and compact data structures that can efficiently explore the exponentially large number of possible packets that may be injected at thousands or tens of thousands of devices and ports in the network.

Using mathematical network verification can help enterprises prevent the outages and breaches that lead to astronomical losses, both informational and financial. Unlike techniques such as penetration testing and traffic analysis, mathematical network verification performs exhaustive analysis of all possible data-flow behavior in the network, before it happens – before vulnerabilities can be exploited, and without waiting for users to experience outages. If there is a network policy violation, verification will find it and provide a precise identification of the vulnerability and how to fix the flaw. The underlying technology allows for millisecond-level analysis of security policies, enabling real-time alerting and policy enforcement, and can provide mathematical evidence that the network is correct, giving organizations the confidence to implement changes to their infrastructure.

Real-time Situational Awareness

Depending on how an organization applies mathematical network verification to its network, the technology can collect a real-time situational awareness of a network’s data-plane state (the lowest and most foundational information in a network device), develop a flow model of the entire network and perform a rigorous analysis of security policies in real time to detect vulnerabilities and policy violations.

In a world where a network intrusion can result in billion-dollar losses, brand damage and outages of critical functionality, mathematical network verification represents a significant step towards improving overall network health and preventing network outages and breaches. It is the only technology available today capable of providing rigorous, real-time analysis at the deep data-plane level of a complex network, and it produces a level of confidence not attainable by other approaches.

Mathematical network verification is a unique technology that has already demonstrated success in multiple Fortune 500 and government networks. We will likely see quick adoption of the technology when organizations discover how quickly and dramatically it improves network security and resilience, making change-induced breaches and outages a thing of the past.

By Dr. Brighten Godfrey

Business Analytics Vs Data Science

Business Analytics Vs Data Science

Big Data Continues To Grow

Big Data continues to be a much discussed topic of interest and for good reason.  According to a recent report from International Data Corporation (IDC), “worldwide revenues for big data and business analytics will grow from nearly $122 billion in 2015 to more than $187 billion in 2019, an increase of more than 50% over the five-year forecast period. The new Spending Guide expands on IDC’s previous forecasts by offering greater revenue detail by technology, industry, and geography...)

This is very good news for businesses and investors involved in this growing industry. For anyone looking to break into this market as a career choice will possibly find the infographic of use below.

analytics-skills-infographic-big-data

(Infographic Source: onlinebusiness.american.edu)

Is The Fintech Industry The Next Tech Bubble?

Is The Fintech Industry The Next Tech Bubble?

The Fintech Industry

Banks offered a wide variety of services such as payments, money transfers, wealth management, selling insurance, etc. over the years. While banks have expanded the number of services they offer, their core still remains credit and interest.

Many experts believe that since banks offered such a wide multitude of services, they have lost their focus and have over extended themselves. This is why many Fintech startups started in the last decade are starting to give banks a run for their money. Most of these fintech startups specialize in one particular field and focus on customer experience and convenience.

For instance, PayPal started offering online payments as a service for merchants when checks were becoming irrelevant for e-commerce transactions. This immediately made PayPal a household name and the company was able to gain significant market shares in a sector that was gravely neglected by banks.

DealSunny, a company that specializes in special offers and coupons, devised a neat infographic exposing some of the facts about the amazingly fast growing Fintech industry. This infographic should help you make sense of the current climate in the Fintech sector. Here are a few points we got from the infographic (see the full infographic below):

Fin tech

1. As of the end of 2015, there were 1362 fintech companies spread across 54 countries in the world. While most of them are startups, the industry as a whole has received a staggering $25.8 billion in funding from investors. That is an average of $44 million per company.

2. Fintech experts say that Israel, United States and the United Kingdom offer the best ecosystems for fintech startups with knowledgeable and willing investors, friendly government regulations and government incentives for the industry. Specifically, most fintech startups are clustered around Tel Aviv in Israel, London in the United Kingdom and Silicon Valley, Los Angeles & Boston in the United States.

3. While many countries provide a good ecosystem for fintech startups, no country can match the United Kingdom, Singapore and Luxembourg. These countries invite the fintech startups with a red carpet giving them many incentives to launch and operate their business in their country. The United Kingdom offers many perks such as tax holidays and a £860 million fund from the National Cyber Security Programme for deserving cyber security companies. Singapore and Luxembourg have launched many initiatives for financing and incentivizing fintech startups in their country.

4. The initiatives undertaken by the governments have paid off and London in the UK, Singapore and Tel Aviv are among the frontrunners in the fintech industry. The Nordic countries are expected to lead a lot of development in this field in the future. The most famous cities for fintech companies in these countries are Oslo, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stockholm and Helsinki.

5. While the success of Fintech in our increasingly interconnected world is a no-brainer, there are some other important reasons for the exponential growth of the industry. Many people are switching from banks to Fintech companies because these services are said to be easier to setup, offer attractive pricing options and provide a better online experience compared to conventional companies. Also, many people claim to have switched because of the better quality of service offered by Fintech alternatives along with their more innovative solutions.

6. While fintech companies are located in over 50 countries around the world, a large chunk of the $49.7 billion that was invested internationally has been grabbed by companies in the United States and the United Kingdom. $31.6 billion out of all the investments in the industry has gone to the fintech companies in the US alone, while UK received a mere $5.4 billion. Other countries that have received more than a billion in funding are China and India. All the fintech companies in the European Union combined have received $4.4 billion in funding.

While it is true that many of the popular financial technology companies have stolen market shares from traditional banks, many experts are of the opinion that these companies are a necessary evil for banks. Banks are usually huge and have a monopolistic position in the markets that they operate in. This gives them few incentives and a lot of difficulties when it comes to implementing new technologies for their operations. Fintech firms have now forced banks into offering better services to their customers by way of new technologies, making the world better for all of us.

By Robert Hendriks

Infographic Introduction – Benefits of Cloud Computing

Infographic Introduction – Benefits of Cloud Computing

Benefits of Cloud Computing

Based on Aberdeen Group’s Computer Intelligence Dataset, there are more than 1.6 billion permutations to choose from when it comes to cloud computing solutions.

So what, on the face of it, appears to be pretty simple is actually both complex and dynamic regardless of whether you’re in the market for networking, storage, servers, telephony, virtualisation or applications.

By making the right choices for your cloud computing technology you stand to benefit from improvements in profitability, improved time to decision, improvements in complete and on-time delivery and reduction in downtime.

What is cloud computing?

TSG has created infographic to help you navigate your way through the benefits of cloud technologies and ensure your business doesn’t get left behind.

(Infographic created by UK IT Support Solutions Company, TSG)

TSG---infographic---Benefits-of-Cloud-Computing-compressor

Infographic: The Evolving Internet of Things

Infographic: The Evolving Internet of Things

Evolving Internet of Things 

The Internet of Things, or IoT, a term devised in 1999 by British entrepreneur Kevin Ashton, represents the connection of physical devices, systems and services via the internet, and Gartner and Lucas Blake’s new infographic (below) explores the evolution of the IoT industry, investigating its potential impact across just about every aspect of our lives in the coming years. Says W. Roy Schulte, vice president and analyst at Gartner, “Uses of the IoT that were previously impractical will increasingly become practical. The IoT is relevant in virtually every industry, although not in every application. There will be no purely ‘IoT applications.’ Rather, there will be many applications that leverage the IoT in some small or large aspect of their work. As a result, business analysts and developers of information-centric processes need to have the expertise and the tools to implement IoT aspects that play a role in their systems.

Evolution-IoT

(Infographic Source: Lucas Blake)

The 5 Year View

By 2020, Gartner predicts that more than half of major new business processes and systems will incorporate some element of the internet of things, and analysts have disclosed a few more unexpected implications resulting from the Internet of Things. Until 2018, it’s predicted that 75% of IoT projects will take up to twice as long as planned, resulting in cost overruns. Unsurprisingly, more complicated and/or ambitious projects are likely to have greater scheduling overruns, and compromises made are liable to lead to weak performances, security risks and integration problems.

It’s also expected that by 2020 a black market exceeding $5 billion will exist selling fake sensors and video data. New security risks and privacy repercussions are occurring with the IoT solutions and the types of data they generate, and organizations are seeing a new kind of IT complexity which without adequate appreciation and comprehension could critically jeopardize organizations. “The IoT has enormous potential to collect continuous data about our environment,” states Ted Friedman, vice president and analyst at Gartner. “The integrity of this data will be important in making personal and business decisions… A black market for fake or corrupted sensor and video data will mean that data can be compromised or substituted with inaccurate or deliberately manipulated data. This scenario will spur the growth of privacy products and services, resulting in an extensive public discussion regarding the future of privacy, the means to protect individual privacy, and the role of technology and government in privacy protection.

Gartner also points to the expectation that 2020 will see an increase in IoT security costs to 20% of annual security budgets, a drastic increase from the 1% in 2015. Says Earl Perkins, research vice president at Gartner, “Major cybersecurity vendors and service providers are already delivering roadmaps and architecture of IoT security, in anticipation of market opportunity. Small startups delivering niche IoT security in areas such as network segmentation, device-to-device authentication and simple data encryption are offering first-generation products and services, including cloud-based solutions where applicable. Large security vendors have already begun acquiring some of these IoT startups to support their early roadmaps and fill niches in their portfolios.”

Noteworthy IoT Stats

  • According to Gartner, 20.8 billion connected things will be used globally by 2020.
  • This year, 5.5 million new things will be connected every day.
  • Gartner predicts IoT will support a 22% increase in total service spending this year, reaching $235 billion.
  • Regarding hardware spending, consumer applications will amount to $546 billion this year.
  • IoT use in the enterprise will reach $868 in 2016.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Most Active Internet Of Things Investors In The Last 5 Years

Most Active Internet Of Things Investors In The Last 5 Years

Most Active Internet Of Things Investors

A recent BI Intelligence report claimed that the Internet of Things (IoT) is on its way to becoming the largest device market in the world.

Quite naturally, such exponential growth of the IoT market has prompted a number of high-profile corporate investors and smart money VCs to bet highly on this comparatively still nascent industry.

IoT-InfoGraphic11

A recently discovered CB Insight report via Twitter stated that the funding of  IoT startups has more than doubled over the last five years. Amongst the most active IoT startup investors since 2010 were Intel Capital at number one, followed by Qualcomm Ventures at the second spot.

Interestingly, the venture arms of both the tech giants have been particularly focused on sensor companies and wearable startups. Industry observers are of the view that because their core business model is heavily reliant on the design and manufacture of ever-smaller chips that power, both Intel and Qualcomm are more inclined to see IoT startups as strategic assets.

In 2015, Intel Capital led a particularly successful round to BodyLabs, a startup that deals in 3D body-scanning sensors. Apart from that, the company invested in Sano Intelligence, another fast-growing developer of biometric sensors.

Other IoT infrastructure startups that bagged rather lucrative investments from Intel Capital include Bocom Intelligent Network Technologies, SigFox, and Stratoscale.

Similarly, Qualcomm Ventures have also been showing great interest in emerging brands such as drone manufacturer 3D Robotics and Whistle Labs, a dog wearable manufacturer. In addition, the company also have invested in sensor networks made by Placemeter, Panoramic Power and Streetline.

Foundry Group and KPCB made it to the third rank in the list of top IoT investors. While Foundry Group seemed particularly focused on hardware manufacturers such as Fitbit, MakerBot and LittleBits, KPCB has been investing across a diverse range of IoT niches including auto, home automation, as well as wearables.

By Brent Anderson

CloudTweaks Comics
Cloud Infographic: IoT For Automotive Deconstructed

Cloud Infographic: IoT For Automotive Deconstructed

IoT For Automotive Deconstructed The IoT automotive industry is moving rapidly with many exciting growth opportunities available. We’ve written about some of the risks and benefits as well as some of the players involved. One thing for certain as that the auto industry is starting to take notice and we can expect the implementation of a…

Will Your Internet of Things Device Testify Against You?

Will Your Internet of Things Device Testify Against You?

Will Your Internet of Things Device Testify Imagine this:  Your wearable device is subpoenaed to testify against you.  You were driving when you were over the legal alcohol limit and data from a smart Breathalyzer device is used against you. Some might argue that such a use case could potentially safeguard society. However, it poses…

Cloud Computing Checklist For Startups

Cloud Computing Checklist For Startups

Checklist For Startups  There are many people who aspire to do great things in this world and see new technologies such as Cloud computing and Internet of Things as a tremendous offering to help bridge and showcase their ideas. The Time Is Now This is a perfect time for highly ambitious startups to make some…

Cloud Infographic – What Is The Internet of Things?

Cloud Infographic – What Is The Internet of Things?

What Is The Internet of Things? “We’re still in the first minutes of the first day of the Internet revolution.”  – Scott Cook The Internet of Things (IOT) and Smart Systems are based on the notions of Sensors, Connectivity, People and Processes. We are creating a new world to view and measure anything around us through…

Why Small Businesses Need A Business Intelligence Dashboard

Why Small Businesses Need A Business Intelligence Dashboard

The Business Intelligence Dashboard As a small business owner you would certainly know the importance of collecting and analyzing data pertaining to your business and transactions. Business Intelligence dashboards allow not only experts but you also to access information generated by analysis of data through a convenient display. Anyone in the company can have access…

Why Cloud Compliance Doesn’t Need To Be So Overly Complicated

Why Cloud Compliance Doesn’t Need To Be So Overly Complicated

Cloud Compliance  Regulatory compliance is an issue that has not only weighed heavily on the minds of executives, security and audit teams, but also today, even end users. Public cloud adds more complexity when varying degrees of infrastructure (depending on the cloud model) and data fall out of the hands of the company and into…

Cost of the Cloud: Is It Really Worth It?

Cost of the Cloud: Is It Really Worth It?

Cost of the Cloud Cloud computing is more than just another storage tier. Imagine if you’re able to scale up 10x just to handle seasonal volumes or rely on a true disaster-recovery solution without upfront capital. Although the pay-as-you-go pricing model of cloud computing makes it a noticeable expense, it’s the only solution for many…

Cloud Infographic – Big Data Predictions By 2023

Cloud Infographic – Big Data Predictions By 2023

Big Data Predictions By 2023 Everything we do online from social networking to e-commerce purchases, chatting, and even simple browsing yields tons of data that certain organizations collect and poll together with other partner organizations. The results are massive volumes of data, hence the name “Big Data”. This includes personal and behavioral profiles that are stored, managed, and…

Infographic: The Evolving Internet of Things

Infographic: The Evolving Internet of Things

Evolving Internet of Things  The Internet of Things, or IoT, a term devised in 1999 by British entrepreneur Kevin Ashton, represents the connection of physical devices, systems and services via the internet, and Gartner and Lucas Blake’s new infographic (below) explores the evolution of the IoT industry, investigating its potential impact across just about every…

Explosive Growth Of Data-Driven Marketing

Explosive Growth Of Data-Driven Marketing

Data-Driven Marketing There is an absolute endless amount of data that is being accumulated, dissected, analyzed with the important bits extracted and used for a number of purposes. With the amount of data in the world has already reached into multiple zettabytes annually. A Zettabyte is one million petabytes or one thousand exabytes. With data…

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

Lavabit, Edward Snowden and the Legal Battle For Privacy

The Legal Battle For Privacy In early June 2013, Edward Snowden made headlines around the world when he leaked information about the National Security Agency (NSA) collecting the phone records of tens of millions of Americans. It was a dramatic story. Snowden flew to Hong Kong and then Russia to avoid deportation to the US,…

Having Your Cybersecurity And Eating It Too

Having Your Cybersecurity And Eating It Too

The Catch 22 The very same year Marc Andreessen famously said that software was eating the world, the Chief Information Officer of the United States was announcing a major Cloud First goal. That was 2011. Five years later, as both the private and public sectors continue to adopt cloud-based software services, we’re interested in this…

The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions Running a cloud server is no longer the novel trend it once was. Now, the cloud is a necessary data tier that allows employees to access vital company data and maintain productivity from anywhere in the world. But it isn’t a perfect system — security and performance issues can quickly…

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Staying on Top of Your Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security Responsibilities

Infrastructure-as-a-Service Security It’s no secret many organizations rely on popular cloud providers like Amazon and Microsoft for access to computing infrastructure. The many perks of cloud services, such as the ability to quickly scale resources without the upfront cost of buying physical servers, have helped build a multibillion-dollar cloud industry that continues to grow each…

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

The Fully Aware, Hybrid-Cloud Approach

Hybrid-Cloud Approach For over 20 years, organizations have been attempting to secure their networks and protect their data. However, have any of their efforts really improved security? Today we hear journalists and industry experts talk about the erosion of the perimeter. Some say it’s squishy, others say it’s spongy, and yet another claims it crunchy.…

Why Security Practitioners Need To Apply The 80-20 Rules To Data Security

Why Security Practitioners Need To Apply The 80-20 Rules To Data Security

The 80-20 Rule For Security Practitioners  Everyday we learn about yet another egregious data security breach, exposure of customer data or misuse of data. It begs the question why in this 21st century, as a security industry we cannot seem to secure our most valuable data assets when technology has surpassed our expectations in other regards.…

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart Change-Induced Network Outages and Breaches

How Formal Verification Can Thwart  Breaches Formal verification is not a new concept. In a nutshell, the process uses sophisticated math to prove or disprove whether a system achieves its desired functional specifications. It is employed by organizations that build products that absolutely cannot fail. One of the reasons NASA rovers are still roaming Mars…

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Despite Record Breaches, Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority

Secure Third Party Access Still Not An IT Priority Research has revealed that third parties cause 63 percent of all data breaches. From HVAC contractors, to IT consultants, to supply chain analysts and beyond, the threats posed by third parties are real and growing. Deloitte, in its Global Survey 2016 of third party risk, reported…