Category Archives: Security

IBM Advancing Hybrid Cloud with AI and Cloud Ready Servers in Mind

IBM Advancing Hybrid Cloud with AI and Cloud Ready Servers in Mind

IBM Advancing Hybrid Cloud

IBM has just announced the introduction of new systems and solutions for the cloud with their latest offerings allowing clients to capitalize on private cloud environments as they simultaneously utilize the IBM Cloud for balancing of workloads necessary due to shifting business demands. Included in their cloud-ready offerings is a new line of Power Systems for IBM Cloud which incorporates integrated solutions that enable clients to extend workloads to the IBM Cloud, and IMB Spectrum Protect with new performance optimization for cloud storage pools. Providing a complete hybrid cloud strategy, IBM promises advanced hardware solutions along with IBM Cloud in an effort to help businesses get the most from technological infrastructures.

In a statement to CloudTweaks, says Scott Crowder, CTO & Vice President, IBM Systems, “The shift to cognitive and cloud will have huge implications for IT. In order to pull meaningful insight out of data, businesses need IT infrastructure that can handle the data and processing requirements of new cognitive technologies. In order to take meaningful actions based on those insights, businesses need IT infrastructure that can integrate rapidly-created applications built in the cloud with core enterprise business processes and data. IBM today introduced on-premises offerings designed for hybrid cloud environments, delivering new infrastructure that is optimized for Big Data and cognitive workloads.”

The Hybrid Cloud Era

edge-photo-2

(IBM Edge – Photo by IBM)

Recognizing business’ investment in cloud technologies across all industries for its improved efficiency, greater innovation, and effortless growth, IBM asserts that clients are looking for a blend of private cloud, public cloud, and traditional IT platforms, and so has developed new solutions to progress hybrid cloud integration. Launched at IBM Edge in Las Vegas this week, the new IBM cloud-ready systems, services and solutions simplify data movement, services, and applications across hybrid cloud environments. Says Tom Rosamilia, senior vice president, IBM Systems, “Today’s business environment is very dynamic and filled with disruption. A hybrid cloud model enables clients to continuously adapt while also optimizing on-premises investments. IBM is uniquely able to support the flexibility clients need across IBM Systems and the cloud.

A recent survey found that the majority of the highest performing organizations measured utilize integrated or highly coordinated cloud initiatives and 92% of respondents stated that the most successful cloud projects allowed for the creation and support of new business models. However, even as cloud use expands, it’s expected that 45% of workloads will remain on dedicated on-premises systems. To this end, IBM’s new system offerings have been designed specifically for hybrid cloud:

  • IBM Spectrum Copy Data Management and Protect encourages the agility and efficiency of operations and development through detailed but user-friendly management of data copies.
  • Power Systems for cloud, with integrated OpenStack-based cloud management and elastic consumption models help customers transform IT infrastructure to a local cloud for IBM I, AIX, and Linux workloads.
  • z Systems for cloud, a SaaS-based solution, aids users in better application and business decision making through trend data and embedded expertise on real performance data.

An Open Ecosystem

But IBM hasn’t limited its contribution to proprietary solutions only; supporting open communities and standards, IBM ensures clients have access t o a wide range of choices in the creation of an inclusive cloud strategy that best addresses their own business and marketplace demands. New and expanded collaborations spanning local and public cloud environments include:

  • Joint engineering and deeper product collaboration with Red Hat.
  • NGINX’s application delivery platform now supporting servers based on IBM’s POWER architecture.
  • Hortonworks, one of the world’s leading big data platforms, is entering the marketplace with IBM to sell Hortonworks Hadoop distribution on POWER.
  • The Canonical and IBM hybrid cloud partnership is expanding as Canonical makes Ubuntu OpenStack available on LinuxONE, z Systems, and Power Systems.
  • IBM and Mirantis collaboration is set to develop reference architectures which allow Mirantis OpenStack to manage compute nodes hosted on IBM Power System servers, as well as validate many core applications to run its OpenStack private cloud.

With this array of new and advanced solutions, as well as many attractive collaborations, the hybrid cloud market continues its dynamic progress.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Around The Cloud – Top Tech News For The Week

Around The Cloud – Top Tech News For The Week

Top Tech News

Apple’s iPhone 7 and Samsung’s Note 7 got off to a rocky start this week upon their launches. Both companies addressed some serious flaws in their flagship smartphone models and operating systems.

According to this BBC article, some iPhone users were shocked to find that when they attempted to upgrade to iOS 10, they could not reboot their phones. An Apple spokeswoman commented on this in a widely publicized email, “We experienced a brief issue with the software update process, affecting a small number of users during the first hour of availability. The problem was quickly resolved and we apologize to those customers. Anyone who was affected should connect to iTunes to complete the update or contact AppleCare for help.” However, some Apple iPhone 6 Plus users are still complaining that Apple has failed to fix a design flaw in the iPhone that renders it incapacitated after a period of time under normal usage, according to this Motherboard article. Apple has yet to recognize this as an official flaw.

Note 7 Recall

Samsung also had to officially recall its Note 7 smartphone this past week in the U.S., after regulators found that the smartphone came with a faulty battery that presents a high risk of catching on fire, according to this article by BBC. Samsung had already issued a voluntary recall of the Note 7 after they started receiving complaints from consumers about their phones “exploding.” It is estimated that this recall has affected 2.5 million devices globally, with 1 million of those devices being in the U.S. alone. Slash Gear reports that replacement handsets will be available in the U.S. no later than Wednesday, September 21.

Searching For Uber

Uber also has been making headlines this past week with their new driverless cars and map making efforts in the U.K. In this official blog post, Uber describes the need for their new map initiative: “Existing maps are a good starting point, but some information isn’t that relevant to Uber, like ocean topography. There are other things we need to know a lot more about, like traffic patterns and precise pickup and dropoff locations. Moreover, we need to be able to provide a seamless experience in parts of the world where there aren’t detailed maps – or street signs.”

uber

The New York Times sent several journalists to Pittsburgh to explore what riding in one of Uber’s driverless cars was like. These driverless cars are described as being modified Ford Fusions that have been outfitted with 20 cameras, seven lasers, a spinning 360-degree laser-based detection system, and “1,400 other after-market parts.” Uber is currently testing these vehicles in Pittsburgh, with “safety engineers” riding along with passengers to help address any bugs in the car’s system and take over driving if need be. The NYT reporter Mike Isaac sums up the experience: “...for most of the ride, I felt safe. In self-driving mode, turns and stops were near seamless, and I often had to check in with my driver to see whether he or the computer was steering the car. I did grow a bit nervous a few times when watching how close the computer drove us to cars parked on the right side of a street. Though, admittedly, that could have been my mind playing tricks on me by being more vigilant than usual about my surroundings.”

By Jonquil McDaniel

Data Privacy In The IoT Age

Data Privacy In The IoT Age

Data Privacy Age

Data breaches are becoming a bigger threat than ever in today’s IoT connected world, according to this CEB blog’s infographic. A data breach is costing companies an average 4 million U.S. dollars, and that statistic is on the rise. The average cost of data breaches has already gone up 13% since 2014 alone.

infographic-importance-of-data-privacy

There are four major factors that have been identified as the cause in this epic rise. 64% of employees access personal technologies such as social networks and email from work, creating a major hole in a company’s ability to ensure the flow of data is through trusted sites only. 65% of IT executives have been found to claim responsibility for technology use and information security, but they manage the company’s information technology very poorly. And while 79% of senior executives admit that finding new uses of data is key to encouraging growth, 69% agree that they can’t keep up with the increasing speed and finesse of cyber attacks.

Another problem that has been found in the protection of data involves employee usage of company networks. While 75% of employees have access to customer contact information, 37% do not receive any form of information security training. Because of this lack of training, 58% of these employees violated a privacy policy in 2015 without even knowing they had done so. It should come at no surprise then that 60% of data breaches have been found to be caused by employee behavior.

By Jonquil McDaniel

Mass Technology Leadership Council Celebrates Innovation Community at 19th Annual Gala

Mass Technology Leadership Council Celebrates Innovation Community at 19th Annual Gala

Mass Technology Leadership

State’s Foremost Technology Trade Association Honors Trailblazers of Massachusetts’ Technology Economy, Champions in Diversity and Education With Coveted Leadership Awards

BOSTON, MA–(Marketwired – Sep 15, 2016) – Hundreds of the region’s most influential executives, community leaders, business luminaries and media celebrated the state’s world-renowned spirit of innovation last night at the 19th annual MassTLC Leadership Awards Gala. Applauding the people and companies shaping the Massachusetts technology economy, awards were given to the winners in 16 categories — including company of the year winner, Wayfair, and 2016 CEO of the year, Kronos’ Aron Ain. The Gala took place at Boston’s Seaport World Trade Center.

Several visionaries also earned special recognition for making tangible contributions to their communities. Distinguished Leadership awards were given to David Delmar, Founder, Resilient Coders; Nigel Jacob, Co-Founder, Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics; and Vicky Wu Davis, Executive Director and Founder, Youth CITIES. In addition, Anthony Williams, Vice President of Global Talent Acquisition and Diversity at Akamai Technologies, received the Council’s inaugural Mosaic Award, given in conjunction with Black Tech Boston.

When it comes to vision and executable innovation that makes the world a better place, Massachusetts sets the pace for the rest of the world,” said Tom Hopcroft, CEO, MassTLC. “Our history is one of solving big problems, changing lives and making anything possible. It’s an honor to host a gala that once again brought together the most important players across the state’s tech, civic and business sectors to celebrate the accomplishments of so many, while looking ahead to what this community will accomplish in the days ahead.”

Selected from hundreds of nominations, and evaluated by panels comprising dozens of executives, investors, analysts, media and thought leaders, winners in the 16 categories are:

CEO of the Year: Aron Ain, Kronos

CTO of the Year: Greg Hinkle, Evergage

Emerging Executive of the Year: Mike Festa, Wayfair

Best Use of Technology – Big Data: Progress Software

Best Use of Technology – Cloud: Fuze

Best Use of Technology – Internet of Things: Powerhouse Dynamics

Innovative Tech of the Year – Ed Tech: Cognii

Innovative Tech of the Year – Consumer Tech: Mini Mole

Innovative Tech of the Year – Fin Tech: Mineral Tree

Innovative Tech of the Year – Healthcare Tech: Wellist

Innovative Tech of the Year – Mobile: Toast

Innovative Tech of the Year – Sales & Marketing: Allego

Innovative Tech of the Year – Security: Pwnie Express

Innovative Tech of the Year – Robotics: Symbotic

Company of the Year: Wayfair

Emerging Company of the Year: Fuze

View the full list of finalists online: http://www.masstlc.org/?page=2016winners

Awards Program Platinum Sponsors: Century Link, CHEN PR, Cisco, Marsh & McLennan Agency, Microsoft, PwC and Unosquare.

Gold Sponsors: Black Tech Boston, CoreSite, Hired, K Square Law, Matter Communications,Pretty Instant and Raytheon.

About The Mass Technology Leadership Council, Inc.

With 500+ member companies, the Mass Technology Leadership Council (MassTLC) is the region’s leading technology association and the premier network for tech executives, entrepreneurs, investors and policy leaders. MassTLC’s purpose is to accelerate innovation by connecting people from across the technology landscape, providing access to industry-leading content and ideas and offering a platform for visibility for member companies and their interests. More at www.masstlc.org.

Security and the Potential of 2 Billion Device Failures

Security and the Potential of 2 Billion Device Failures

IoT Device Failures

I have, over the past three years, posted a number of Internet of Things (and the broader NIST-defined Cyber Physical Systems) conversations and topics. I have talked about drones, wearables and many other aspects of the Internet of Things.

One of the integration problems has been the number of protocols the various devices use to communicate with one another. The rise of protocol gateways in the cloud service provider market is an incredibly good thing. Basically, this allows an organization to map sensors and other IoT/CPOS device outputs to a cloud gateway that will connect, transfer and communicate with the device – regardless of the device’s protocol of choice.

Racing out of the Gate

horse-race-1507078_640

What the new gateways do is remove integration as a stumbling block for ongoing and future IoT solutions. Pick the wrong horse in the initial protocol race? With a gateway, it doesn’t matter. You can, over time, replace the devices deployed with the orphaned protocol and move forward with your system. The cloud service provider protocol gateway gives you the flexibility to also consider deploying multiple types of sensors and protocols, instead of limiting your organization to one.

The question going forward is this: does the integration provided by the gateway give rise to the broader concept of an IoT broker? This is where the services offered by IoT devices could be parsed out and shared within organizations and companies that are members of the broker. Think of it as being like a buyer’s club for sensors.

From my perspective, the issue that keeps me awake at night is IoT device security. For the most part, IoT devices are often ‘fire and forget’. Yes, occasionally, you may have to change a battery or replace a cellular connection. Sometimes you may have to update how the device is deployed. Others just aren’t going to be attacked because you won’t gain anything. I read an article that wrote about hacking the river monitoring system, causing a flood downstream. I thought about that for a long time, and I realized the reality of flooding is we know when it coming and everyone would be out there with manual measurements anyway. That would work. There are other ways to create an effective attack through the IoT.

It is the security of IoT devices that will become more and more troublesome. Firstly, because the number of them is growing rapidly. From 10 billion or so deployed in 2015 to more than 40 billion devices deployed by 2020. That’s 4 times the devices in the next 4 years.

If we consider the reality of devices, that means that many devices that are deployed today will still be deployed in 4 years. The cost of devices and often the capital expenses for hardware are spread over 3 to 5 years. That means a growing number of devices will be already deployed by 2020. It isn’t a run to the cliff and then leap into 40 billion deployed devices.

2 Billion Device Failures

IOT-DEVICES-BW

What scares me is that there are 10 billion or so devices deployed today. Logically, 2 billion of them will fail. 2 billion more will be replaced naturally. That leaves 6 billion devices deployed with the security solutions of today – that will rapidly become obsolete. That is a fairly expensive number to replace. The gateways mentioned earlier in this article will suddenly appear again. Today, they represent a way to bring multiple IoT protocols together. In the future, they will become the best line of defense for deployed devices.

Deploying secure solutions at the gateway level will be the best defense against attacks for IoT devices that do not have integrated security. The next-best thing would be the deployment of devices with easily removed security modules, but that is a consideration for upcoming devices – not ones deployed today.

A secure IoT future – enabled by a simple cloud gateway.

By Scott Andersen

Negotiating Wearable Device Security

Negotiating Wearable Device Security

Wearable Device Security

Recent studies have highlighted gaps in security and privacy created by wearable technology, with one report by the US Department of Health noting that many of the new devices available which “collect, share and use health information are not regulated by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).” With personal information collected and shared more than ever, regulations managing the security and privacy of such data have a hard time keeping up with the potential risks and this particular report suggests, “To ensure privacy, security, and access by consumers to health data, and to create a predictable business environment for health data collectors, developers, and entrepreneurs to foster innovation, the gaps in oversight identified in this report should be filled.” Pertinent questions, however, remain. Who is responsible for ensuring adequate privacy and security concerns are addressed? And precisely where are all of these gaps?

Widespread Concerns

comic-cloutweaks-modern-times

Concerns aren’t only for the vulnerability of health data, though it should be understood that much of this information is highly sensitive and necessarily requires the provision of first class security measures. Research from Binghamton University and the Stevens Institute of Technology has pointed to the potential for wearable devices to leak passwords. Using data from wearable tech sensors including smartwatches and fitness trackers, researchers were able to crack pins on a first attempt 80% of the time. Of course, some might shrug and suggest they care very little if hackers have access to how many steps they’ve taken on any particular day, but let’s not forget the data available to anyone who cracks the code of a smartwatch, nor how many of us reuse pins across devices. Says Yan Wang, assistant professor of computer science within the Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science at Binghamton University, “Wearable devices can be exploited. Attackers can reproduce the trajectories of the user’s hand then recover secret key entries to ATM cash machines, electronic door locks, and keypad-controlled enterprise servers. The threat is real, although the approach is sophisticated.”

Business Adoption of Wearable Tech

A range of benefits exists for the adoption of wearable tech within companies, including improved productivity, better employee safety, and enhanced customer engagement. However, the security concerns of wearable tech are as, if not more, pronounced as those which exist in personal environments. Network security, in particular, is put under strain with the appropriate configuration of an organization’s network being a key fortification. Because many of the wearable devices we’re using today have poor or no encryption, data interception is easier and company networks which were otherwise well secured become vulnerable. Moreover, most wearables arrive with software that is unique and difficult to update resulting in an ecosystem of dissimilar devices each with their own distinctive weaknesses, requiring tailored security adjustments.

The Fix?

There is, unfortunately, no one-fits-all solution to the security and privacy issues of our wearables, and besides, any solution today will be in need of updates and amendments tomorrow. But the future of wearables is by no mean a bleak one. Responsible designers and developers are accounting for today’s concerns with more robust security processes for the next generations of devices, and networks are already being restructured to guard against wearable vulnerabilities.

Wang points to two attacking scenarios, internal and sniffing attacks, the first typically perpetrated through malware and the second via wireless sniffers that eavesdrop on sensor data sent via Bluetooth. Solutions to such assaults include improved encryption between host operating systems and wearable devices, and the injection of “a certain type of noise to data so it cannot be used to derive fine-grained hand movements.” And for businesses keen to adopt BYOD policies, the implementation of channels outside of the company network specifically for wearable devices can ensure limited access to sensitive data.

Finding the middle ground between the benefits of wearable device usage and the vulnerabilities they introduce is likely to be a painstaking negotiation at first but the more policies defined and effected, the better networks are delineated, and the stronger wearable encryption and protection becomes, the easier the process will be and the greater our rewards.

By Jennifer Klostermann

New Bromium Labs Threat Report

New Bromium Labs Threat Report

2016 Threat Report

The semi-annual Bromium Labs Threat Report has just been released providing an analysis of cyber-attacks and threats which have struck enterprise security in the last six months. It’s found an eruption of ransomware usage as well as an increase in app, browser, and plug-in vulnerabilities and notes that while Microsoft strengthens security, nefarious forces are changing tack and concentrating on ‘drive-by download attacks.’

Significant Conclusions

bromium-evp-and-chief-security-architect-rahul-kashyapThough it’s clear that criminals are working harder than ever to get their hands on protected data, it’s not all bad news. Bromium Labs Threat Report also notes that although the amount of vulnerabilities is constantly rising, they aren’t all being exploited. Unfortunately, there have been several high-profile data breaches and ransomware attacks of late, leaving enterprise security in a somewhat precarious position. Commenting exclusively to CloudTweaks, Bromium EVP and Chief Security Architect, Rahul Kashyap, states, “We’re only halfway through 2016, and our analysis shows numbers of vulnerabilities surpassing 2015 rates. But at the same time, there are less exploits across the board with the exception of Flash, which continues to have high ROI for hackers. Security is improving, but old attack techniques like phishing and watering hole attacks are still plaguing enterprises. It goes without question that we can expect attackers to evolve in response to heightened security. We need isolation and instant protection to secure our networks and data.”

Specific discoveries by Bromium Labs include:

  • A rise in vulnerabilities, with 516 reported to the National Vulnerability Database in the first half of 2016, as compared to 403 vulnerabilities reported over all of 2015.
  • Fewer exploitable vulnerabilities in popular software systems than in previous years, potentially due to the additional attention software vendors’ are giving to security.
  • Adobe Flash had 31 exploits in the first half of 2016, up from eight in 2016, resulting in some security vendors blocking or ending support for Flash. Regrettably from a security standpoint, Flash remains popular with end users and so continues to be a top target for criminals.
  • The most used exploit kits include Neutrino and Rig, though Angler and Nuclear kits also featured but disappeared in early June possibly due to crackdowns on cybercrime groups.
  • Since the beginning of 2016, many new ransomware families have been circulated, the current leader being Locky with 755 tracked instances infecting RAM disks and removable drives.

locky-report

Tackling the Threats

Though the dangers are becoming more sophisticated and insidious, Kashyap believes real efforts are being made to secure networks and IT infrastructure. “As an industry, we’ve always said there’s no one silver bullet to address the complexities of attacks that are affecting our business. However, our latest research shows that enterprises and vendors alike are stepping up to do a better at securing their networks and data. But there’s still work to be done.” It’s expected that over the next 12 months social engineering tactics will continually be exploited by attackers, and “instant protection, detection, and remediation is more critical than ever.”

Bromium Labs finds most AV vendors are executing multiple updates per day in an attempt to keep up with machine timescale attacks but with new malware observable for less than 60 seconds before it transforms into a victim-specific variant current malicious detection capabilities are found to be lacking. It’s suggested the best strategy is a dramatic reduction of the attack surface, isolating attacks and limiting possible danger and spread. Taking a new approach, Bromium’s unique micro-visualization technology is advancing endpoint security and their solution automatically isolates each user-task in a lightweight, CPU-enforced micro-VM. For all of Bromium Labs security insights and judgements, download the full Bromium Lab Threats Report.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Digital Twin And The End Of The Dreaded Product Recall

Digital Twin And The End Of The Dreaded Product Recall

The Digital Twin 

How smart factories and connected assets in the emerging Industrial IoT era along with the automation of machine learning and advancement of artificial intelligence can dramatically change the manufacturing process and put an end to the dreaded product recalls in the future.

In recent news, Samsung Electronics Co. has initiated a global recall of 2.5 millions of their Galaxy Note 7 smartphones, after finding that the batteries of some of their phones exploded while charging. This recall would cost the company close to $1 Billion.

This is not a one-off incident.

Product recalls have plagued the manufacturing world for decades, right from food and drug to automotive industries, causing huge losses and risk to human life. In 1982, Johnson & Johnson recalled 31 million bottles of Tylenol which retailed at $100 million after 7 people died in Chicago-area. In 2000, Ford recalled 20 million Firestone tires losing around $3 billion, after 174 people died in road accidents due to faulty tires. In 2009, Toyota issued a recall of 10 million vehicles due to numerous issues including gas pedals and faulty airbags that resulted in $2 billion loss consisting of repair expenses and lost sales in addition to the stock prices dropping more than 20% or $35 billion.

Most manufacturers have very stringent quality control processes for their products before they are shipped. Then how and why do these faulty products make it to the market which poses serious life risks and business risks?

Koh Dong-jin, president of Samsung’s mobile business, said that the cause of the battery issue in Samsung Galaxy Note 7 device was “a tiny problem in the manufacturing process and so it was very difficult to find out“. This is true for most of the recalls that happens. It is not possible to manually detect these seemingly “tiny” problems early enough before they result in catastrophic outcomes.

But this won’t be the case in the future.

The manufacturing world has seen 4 transformative revolutions:

  • 1st Industrial Revolution brought in mechanization powered by water and stream.
  • 2nd Industrial Revolution saw the advent of the assembly line powered by gas and electricity
  • 3rd Industrial Revolution introduced robotic automation powered by computing networks
  • The 4th Industrial Revolution has taken it to a completely different level with smart and connected assets powered by machine learning and artificial intelligence.

It is this 4th Industrial Revolution that we are just embarking on that has the potential to transform the face of the manufacturing world and create new economic value to the tune of tens of trillions of dollars, globally, from costs savings and new revenue generation. But why is this the most transformative of all revolutions? Because it is this revolution that has transformed mechanical lifeless machines into digital life-forms with the birth of the Digital Twin.

digital-theft

Digital Twin refers to the computerized companions (or models) of the physical assets that use multiple internet-connected sensors on these assets to represent their near real-time status, working condition, position, and other key metrics that help understand the health and functioning of these assets at granular levels. This helps us understand asset and asset health like we understand humans and human health, with the ability to do diagnosis and prognosis like never before.

How can this solve the recall problem?

Sensor enabling the assembly line and creating Digital Twin of all the individual assets and workflows provides timely insights into tiniest of the issues that can otherwise be easily missed in the manual inspection process. This can detect causes and predict potential product quality issues right in the assembly line as early as possible so that the manufacturers can take proactive action to resolve them before they start snowballing.  This can not only prevent recalls but also reduce scraps in the assembly line taking operational efficiency to unprecedented heights.

What is so deterrent? Why is this problem not solved most organizations that have smart-enabled their factories?

The traditional approach of doing data science and machine learning to analyze data doesn’t scale for this problem. Traditionally, predictive models are created by taking a sample of data from a sample of assets and then these models are generalized for predicting issues on all assets. While this can detect common known issues, which otherwise get caught in the quality control process itself, but it fails to detect the rare events that cause the massive recalls. Rare events have failure patterns that don’t commonly occur in the assets or the assembly line. Although, highly sensitive generalized models can be created to detect any and all deviations but that would generate a lot of false positive alerts which cause a different series of problems altogether. The only way to ensure that we get accurate models that detect only the true issues is to model each asset and the workflow channels individually, understand their respective normal operating conditions and detect their respective deviations. But this is what makes this challenge beyond human-scale. When there are hundreds, thousands or millions of assets and components it is impossible to keep generating and updating models for each one of them manually. It requires automation of the predictive modeling and the machine learning process itself, as putting human data scientists in the loop doesn’t scale.

But aren’t there standard approaches or scripts to automate predictive modeling?

Yes, there are. However, these plain vanilla automation of modeling process which just runs all permutations of algorithms and hyper-parameters again doesn’t work. The number of assets and as such the number of individual models, the frequency at which models need to be updated to capture newer real-world events, the volume of the data and the wide variety of sensor attributes all create prohibitive computational complexity (think millions or billions of permutations), even if someone has infinite infrastructure to process them. The only solution is Cognitive Automation, which is an intelligent process that mimics how a human data scientists leverage prior experience to run fewer experiments to get to an optimal ensemble of models in the fastest possible way. In short, this is about teaching machines to do machine learning and data science like an A.I. Data Scientist.

This is the technology that is required to give Digital Twin a true life-form that delivers the end business value – in this case to prevent recalls.

Does it sound like sci-fi?

It isn’t and it is already happening with the advancement in the world of machine learning and artificial intelligence. Companies like Google are using algorithms to create self-driving cars or beat world champions in complex games. At the same time, we at DataRPM are using algorithms to teach machines to do data analysis and detect asset failures and quality issues on the assembly line. This dramatically improves operational efficiency and prevents the product recalls.

The future, where the dreaded product recalls will be a thing of the past, is almost here!

By Ruban Phukan, Co-Founder and Chief Product & Analytics Officer, DataRPM 

www.datarpm.com

CloudTweaks Comics
Cloud Infographic – Big Data Predictions By 2023

Cloud Infographic – Big Data Predictions By 2023

Big Data Predictions By 2023 Everything we do online from social networking to e-commerce purchases, chatting, and even simple browsing yields tons of data that certain organizations collect and poll together with other partner organizations. The results are massive volumes of data, hence the name “Big Data”. This includes personal and behavioral profiles that are stored, managed, and…

Cloud Computing – The Good and the Bad

Cloud Computing – The Good and the Bad

The Cloud Movement Like it or not, cloud computing permeates many aspects of our lives, and it’s going to be a big part of our future in both business and personal spheres. The current and future possibilities of global access to files and data, remote working opportunities, improved storage structures, and greater solution distribution have…

4 Different Types of Attacks – Understanding the “Insider Threat”

4 Different Types of Attacks – Understanding the “Insider Threat”

Understanding the “Insider Threat”  The revelations that last month’s Sony hack was likely caused by a disgruntled former employee have put a renewed spotlight on the insider threat. The insider threat first received attention after Edward Snowden began to release all sorts of confidential information regarding national security. While many called him a hero, what…

Why Cloud Compliance Doesn’t Need To Be So Overly Complicated

Why Cloud Compliance Doesn’t Need To Be So Overly Complicated

Cloud Compliance  Regulatory compliance is an issue that has not only weighed heavily on the minds of executives, security and audit teams, but also today, even end users. Public cloud adds more complexity when varying degrees of infrastructure (depending on the cloud model) and data fall out of the hands of the company and into…

The Future Of Work: What Cloud Technology Has Allowed Us To Do Better

The Future Of Work: What Cloud Technology Has Allowed Us To Do Better

What Cloud Technology Has Allowed Us to Do Better The cloud has made our working lives easier, with everything from virtually unlimited email storage to access-from-anywhere enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. It’s no wonder the 2013 cloud computing research IDG survey revealed at least 84 percent of the companies surveyed run at least one cloud-based application.…

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

Botnets and DDoS Attacks There’s just so much that seems as though it could go wrong with closed-circuit television cameras, a.k.a. video surveillance. With an ever-increasing number of digital eyes on the average person at all times, people can hardly be blamed for feeling like they’re one misfortune away from joining the ranks of Don’t…

Cloud Computing Myths That SMBs Should Know

Cloud Computing Myths That SMBs Should Know

Cloud Computing and SMBs Cloud Computing is the hottest issue among IT intellects of Small and Medium Businesses (SMBs). Like any other computer-orientated technology, Cloud Computing has some misconceptions and myths that often kick-start arguments among the two opposing groups: Cloud Supporters and Cloud Opponents. Both of these groups have their own ideology and reasons…

Disaster Recovery And The Cloud

Disaster Recovery And The Cloud

Disaster Recovery And The Cloud One of the least considered benefits of cloud computing in the average small or mid-sized business manager’s mind is the aspect of disaster recovery. Part of the reason for this is that so few small and mid-size businesses have ever contemplated the impact of a major disaster on their IT…

Consequences Of Combining Off Premise Cloud Storage and Corporate Data

Consequences Of Combining Off Premise Cloud Storage and Corporate Data

Off Premise Corporate Data Storage Cloud storage is a broad term. It can encompass anything from on premise solutions, to file storage, disaster recovery and off premise options. To narrow the scope, I’ve dedicated the focus of today’s discussion to the more popular cloud storage services—such as Dropbox, Box, OneDrive—which are also known as hosted,…

Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

There is a Difference – So Stop Comparing We are all familiar with the old saying “That’s like comparing apples to oranges” and though we learned this lesson during our early years we somehow seem to discount this idiom when discussing the Cloud. Specifically, IT buyers often feel justified when comparing the cost of a…

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Five Requirements for Supporting a Connected Workforce It used to be that enterprises dictated how workers spent their day: stuck in a cubicle, tied to an enterprise-mandated computer, an enterprise-mandated desk phone with mysterious buttons, and perhaps an enterprise-mandated mobile phone if they traveled. All that is history. Today, a modern workforce is dictating how…

Cloud-Based Services vs. On-Premises: It’s About More Than Just Dollars

Cloud-Based Services vs. On-Premises: It’s About More Than Just Dollars

Cloud-Based Services vs. On-Premises The surface costs might give you pause, but the cost of diminishing your differentiators is far greater. Will a shift to the cloud save you money? Potential savings are historically the main business driver cited when companies move to the cloud, but it shouldn’t be viewed as a cost-saving exercise. There…

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

What the Dyn DDoS Attacks Taught Us About Cloud-Only EFSS

DDoS Attacks October 21st, 2016 went into the annals of Internet history for the large scale Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks that made popular Internet properties like Twitter, SoundCloud, Spotify and Box inaccessible to many users in the US. The DDoS attack happened in three waves targeting DNS service provider Dyn, resulting in a total of about…

Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

Cloud Services Providers – Learning To Keep The Lights On

The True Meaning of Availability What is real availability? In our line of work, cloud service providers approach availability from the inside out. And in many cases, some never make it past their own front door given how challenging it is to keep the lights on at home let alone factors that are out of…

Three Reasons Cloud Adoption Can Close The Federal Government’s Tech Gap

Three Reasons Cloud Adoption Can Close The Federal Government’s Tech Gap

Federal Government Cloud Adoption No one has ever accused the U.S. government of being technologically savvy. Aging software, systems and processes, internal politics, restricted budgets and a cultural resistance to change have set the federal sector years behind its private sector counterparts. Data and information security concerns have also been a major contributing factor inhibiting the…

3 Keys To Keeping Your Online Data Accessible

3 Keys To Keeping Your Online Data Accessible

Online Data Data storage is often a real headache for businesses. Additionally, the shift to the cloud in response to storage challenges has caused security teams to struggle to reorient, leaving 49 percent of organizations doubting their experts’ ability to adapt. Even so, decision makers should not put off moving from old legacy systems to…

Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

Choosing IaaS or a Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting Provider?

There is a Difference – So Stop Comparing We are all familiar with the old saying “That’s like comparing apples to oranges” and though we learned this lesson during our early years we somehow seem to discount this idiom when discussing the Cloud. Specifically, IT buyers often feel justified when comparing the cost of a…

Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Out-of-the-box Cloud Solutions Although people may argue that data is not safe in the Cloud because using cloud infrastructure requires trusting another party to look after mission critical data, cloud services actually are more secure than legacy systems. In fact, a recent study on the state of cloud security in the enterprise market revealed that…

Don’t Be Intimidated By Data Governance

Don’t Be Intimidated By Data Governance

Data Governance Data governance, the understanding of the raw data of an organization is an area IT departments have historically viewed as a lose-lose proposition. Not doing anything means organizations run the risk of data loss, data breaches and data anarchy – no control, no oversight – the Wild West with IT is just hoping…