IoT-Travel

How IoT and Travel Go Hand-in-Hand

IoT and Travel 

There is no question that the Internet of Things, or IoT, is here to stay. Just this year alone, Gartner predicts there will be around 6.4 billion connected things in use worldwide, with 5.5 million new things connected each day. By 2020, this figure will go up to approximately 20.8 billion.

IoT is transforming industries and sectors as we know it, from automotive to manufacturing to healthcare. But what about travel? How does it a play a role in one of the fastest growing global industries? It turns out that IoT is creating ample and exciting opportunities in the travel and hospitality industry.

Opportunities in the Aviation Sector

A number of airlines are experimenting with IoT, with over half investing in a number of IoT programs as they believe it will lead to improved passenger experience. So what does a connected world in aviation possibly look like? The opportunities are endless – it could give way to intelligent air cabins that can monitor a passenger’s temperature, and in turn alert a crew member to take a specific action. With increased sensors both on the ground level and in airplanes, passengers will have an increased sense of their surroundings, with the ability to track items like luggage or cargo.

tech-flight

One example of an airline already experimenting with IoT is UK-based budget airline, EasyJet. Last year in a press release, EasyJet announced that it was collaborating with a clothing company to create uniforms for its cabin crew embedded with sensors and LED lights. For crew members, the LED lights will help transmit information, such as flight information and destination. Jackets for its engineers will have microphones and built-in cameras, allowing engineers to receive assistance when diagnosing technical issues. The engineer uniforms will also be equipped with barometers and air quality sensors that can help engineers monitor their work environment.

The London City Airport is an example of an airport testing how IoT can transform its operations. In 2003, the airport was awarded a grant from the UK’s Technology Strategy Board to examine cross-technology networking. The project ran for a year and focused on three areas:

  1. Measuring passenger journeys – Using sensors, the flow pattern and volume of passengers were measured within an airport terminal.

  2. Asset tracking – With custom tracking devices, the movement and positions of airport equipment used to service flights were tracked.

  3. Offering location-based services to passengers – Using an app, specific notifications were sent to passengers specific to their flights and their known position in the airport.

Using these findings, the airport developed a real-time operational dashboard and an IoT solution to measure passenger journeys. The ultimate goal is to help plan for future resources and the necessary infrastructure to help deliver the quickest passenger journey times through the airport.

The Rise of Smart Hotels

Beyond the aviation industry, hotels are looking into IoT to help enhance the customer experience. Investment in IoT programs are apparent with some hotels experimenting with app-based keyless entries for hotel rooms, as well as connected minibars that can immediately detect a traveler’s section. Other notable upgrades include room control systems where guests can adjust in-room temperature and lighting using a smartphone or in-room tablet.

The Aloft Hotel in South Beach introduced Botler, the Robot Butler last year. If a guest needs any sort of amenity, Botler will come to the guest’s door with the particular item requested. After it is delivered, the guest can use Botler’s touch screen to rate their experience.

Machine-to-machine (M2M) technology is making its presence felt in a number of prominent hotel chains and luxury brands. The Hilton chain is another example that have rolled out some great futures via their mobile app. Using their app, guests are able to check in, request items to be delivered to their room, and get access to other areas of the property (such as the pool or gym).

The Internet of Things is offering the travel industry a wealth of opportunity. With connected devices, back-end operations for airlines, cruises, rental cars, hotels are being streamlined. At the same time, data being collected from these devices are allowing companies to deliver a more personalized experience to travelers and guests alike.

By Joya Scarlata

Joya Scarlata

Joya Scarlata is a senior analyst at InterraIT, a San Jose-based technology solutions and services company, working in the areas of market research and marketing.

She loves tracking current technology and marketing trends.

Ransomware, Backups and the Aging IT Specialist

Ransomware, Backups and the Aging IT Specialist

Small Business Cloud Right now, two technology trends characterize the small business ecosystem: a growing migration to the cloud, and a growing susceptibility to cybercrime, particularly in the form of ransomware. Recently, I discovered this ...
Open APIs Alone Won’t Change Banking

Open APIs Alone Won’t Change Banking

Open Banking API's Most people think of banks as one monolithic entity, but they are actually made up of hundreds of independent, pseudo-integrated systems. When a bank wants to make any kind of change, it ...
Opportunities and Pitfalls When Hiring a Chief Data Officer

Opportunities and Pitfalls When Hiring a Chief Data Officer

The Chief Data Officer As part of their digital roadmap, organizations are increasingly taking advantage of big data and making analytics a core aspect of their business. Many of these underline the strategic importance by ...
Four Cloud Security Mega Trends

Four Cloud Security Mega Trends

Cloud Security Trends Last year was a big year for the cloud. Cloud adoption continued to grow at a rapid clip, even as executives from companies such as McDonald’s and ENEL talked about how their ...
Organizational Transformation: Taking The DevOps Dive

Organizational Transformation: Taking The DevOps Dive

Taking The DevOps Dive The Gartner IT Glossary defines DevOps as “…a change in IT culture, focusing on rapid IT service delivery through the adoption of agile, lean practices in the context of a system-oriented approach. DevOps ...
The Lighter Side Of The Cloud - Wearable Infection
Star Wars IoT CES
The Lighter Side Of The Cloud - Techwear
The Lighter Side Of The Cloud - Big Broadband
The Lighter Side Of The Cloud - Really Smart Machines
The Lighter Side Of The Cloud - The Robo-Revolution
The Lighter Of The Cloud - Virtual Lunch Break
The Lighter Side Of The Cloud - Virtual Office Space
The Lighter Side Of The Cloud - Easter Egg Hunt

CLOUDBUZZ NEWS

Researchers combine wearable technology and AI to predict the onset of health problems

Researchers combine wearable technology and AI to predict the onset of health problems

A team of Waterloo researchers found that applying artificial intelligence to the right combination of data retrieved from wearable technology may detect whether your health is failing. The study, which involved researchers from Waterloo’s Faculties ...
Rackspace Launches Kubernetes-as-a-Service with Fully Managed Operations

Rackspace Launches Kubernetes-as-a-Service with Fully Managed Operations

SAN ANTONIO – May 16, 2018 – Rackspace today announced Rackspace Kubernetes-as-a-Service, a highly-available managed service that transforms the way enterprises can utilize new container technologies, accelerating their digital transformation. Rackspace is focused on delivering true transformation ...
Oracle Buys DataScience.com

Oracle Buys DataScience.com

Adds Leading Data Science Platform to the Oracle Cloud, Enabling Customers to Fully Utilize Machine Learning Oracle today announced that it has signed an agreement to acquire DataScience.com, whose platform centralizes data science tools, projects ...