Space Invaders – Is That A Selfie Drone I See Before Me?

Selfie Drone Privacy Issues

The growing concept of privacy is one that I find very interesting and this is where the selfie drone come into play.

Recently a new product has been advertised on TV. It is a personal drone, perfect, as the advertisement says for selfies. First of all, while I understand the need for and have taken a few myself, a selfie should be done with your phone in your hand. A selfie should at worst convince the rest of us crammed into the subway car that this is where you will be taking your selfie.

Space Invaders

For the past two years, there has been an interesting debate going on. The first is who owns an image taken by a camera located in a public place. The argument being that the police have the right to review any images captured by such a camera. However, if my image is there, can they keep it?

The same by the way is also true for all those selfies taken. At arm’s length and aimed towards a person a selfie isn’t likely to get more than part of another person. But if it does who owns that image? Once you launch that selfie drone, what image do you own?

Again, if there is a criminal act, I understand that until the police find the video or evidence of the crime, my image isn’t my image. I accept that invasion of privacy. But if you launch a “selfie” drone are you responsible for my image? What are my rights, walking by you in a park? Am I allowed to knock your drone out of the sky?

For safety, all of us are willing to accept that cameras scan us as we walk into airports and walk out of bus stations, train stations and so on. It is a component of security versus privacy. We accept and understand that our image may appear in pictures that we don’t know about. We accept that because it is important to understand the reality of shared security. I am willing, for the safety of the people around me to accept that.

I do not, however, standing in the park playing frisbee with my dog that my image is open for sharing. I understand the allure of a selfie drone. It offers the opportunity to see all of you and share that with your adoring public. Sharing all of me, however, makes me nervous.

Privacy is about my personal rights. It is about the space around me. Your selfie drone, hovering above you, unless you are using a closeup lens, is capturing me as well. I would prefer that you didn’t do that. As we head into the drone future, the reality of the area around me is personal space. If you violate my personal space with a selfie drone, I may ask you to get away from me. I won’t whack your drone with my selfie stick, but I will nicely ask you to avoid my personal airspace.

If I nicely ask you to land your drone, it isn’t me hating technology. It is simply me saying that I would prefer you to not fly directly over me, broadcast images of me and my dog playing frisbee. I would also prefer that the world didn’t know that my dog never misses, and also throws the frisbee better than I do.

By Scott Andersen

Holiday Photos.png
Hair Loss.png
Viral Infection Wearabletech
Data Bed.png
Episode 16: Bigger is not always better: the benefits of working with smaller cloud providers
The benefits of working with smaller cloud providers A conversation with Ryan Pollock, VP Product Marketing and Developer Relationships for Vultr.com - Everyone knows who the big players are in the cloud business. But sometimes, ...
Martin Mendelsohn
The Colonial Pipeline Dilemma The Colonial Pipeline is one of a number of essential energy and infrastructure assets that have been recently targeted by the global ransomware group DarkSide, and other aspiring non-state actors, with ...
Frank Suglia
Managing Data Sprawl Over the last two years, our world experienced a dramatic acceleration of digital transformation. The COVID-19 pandemic upended normal operations for many businesses and shifted the pace of technology adoption into warp ...
Dinesh Varadharajan
The Future with Automation Many entrepreneurs believe digital technologies will transform the way their companies work. By 2022, the worldwide hyper-automation technology market is expected to be worth $596.6 billion. And by 2055, almost half ...
David Loo
The Long-term Costs of Data Debt It’s no secret that many of today’s enterprises are experiencing an extreme state of data overload. With the rapid adoption of new technologies to accommodate pandemic-induced shifts like remote ...
  • Plural Site

    Pluralsite

    Pluralsight provides online courses on popular programming languages and developer tools. Other courses cover fields such as IT security best practices, server infrastructure, and virtualization.

  • Isc2

    ISC2

    (ISC)² provides IT training, certifications, and exams that run online, on your premises, or in classrooms. Self-study resources are available. You can also train groups of 10 or more of your employees. If you want a job in cybersecurity, this is the route to take.

  • App Academy

    App Academy

    Immersive software engineering programs. No experience required. Pay $0 until you're hired. Join an online info session to learn more

  • Cybrary

    Cybrary

    CYBRARY Open source Cyber Security learning. Free for everyone, forever. The world's largest cyber security community. Cybrary provides free IT training and paid IT certificates. Courses for beginners, intermediates, and advanced users are available.