Category Archives: Security

Lessons Learned From Recent Cloud Security Debacles

Lessons Learned From Recent Cloud Security Debacles

Recent Cloud Security Debacles

Just as cloud computing is on the rise, so are cloud security threats, and they should be on the top priority list of every organization that has embraced cloud-based services. Incidents of cybercrime are being reported quite frequently, but the majority of them are not being reported at all.

Many organizations choose to deal with cyber-attacks on their own, without notifying proper authorities, let alone their customers, about their private information being encrypted or stolen. Such a terrible mistake could cost them their business, but the main reason for those kinds of incidents happening in the first place is that those businesses fail to address the issue of security flaws and fix them immediately.

There were incidents concerning cloud security quite recently, so let’s take a look at what happened and what you can do to prevent the same thing from happening to you and your organization.

The Asus Debacle


Asus put hundreds of thousands of its customers at risk by offering them cloud computing services that had very serious security flaws in their routers, which they failed to fix in a timely manner. They failed to take certain steps towards securing the software in the routers, resulting in thousands of storage devices of their customers being compromised and their personal information being exposed.

Their routers supposedly had security features that could “protect computers from any unauthorized access, hacking, and virus attacks”, but that evidently wasn’t the case. Those routers had major security flaws that Asus didn’t fix and that put all of their customers at risk, especially by failing to notify them about it.

Asus settled an FTC complaint about failing to take security measures to fix the problem and protect its customers’ personal information. The settlement requires Asus to establish and maintain a security program subject to independent audits for the next 20 years.

The Los Angeles Hospital Ransomware Debacle

Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles was yet another victim of cybercrime recently. Their computer systems were locked due to Ransomware, a malicious software often in the form of an e-mail that seems legitimate, that hackers use to literally lock computers and encrypt the data.

Naturally, they request a considerable amount of money to be paid in order for the victims of the attack to retrieve their data. Ransomware is becoming one of the most serious cybersecurity threats nowadays and the worst part about it is that, when you fall prey to such an attack, you have no other choice but to pay the hackers. There is often a limited time for doing so, before you permanently lose access to your data or the data becomes public.

That is what the aforementioned hospital did, paying a $17000 ransom to unlock their computers and get back the encrypted medical records of its patients.

What Can Be Learned from These Cyber-Attacks?


These incidents often happen because not much, if any, attention is being paid to cybersecurity training and the IT staff is underfunded, resulting in many organizations being quite easy targets to cyber-attacks. Every business must address any potential security flaw and fix it quickly in order to prevent data breaches and loss of any sensitive data.

The best way of effectively accomplishing that have always been, and will remain, regular data backups. The encryption of data is also of crucial importance, as well as not allowing the account credentials to be shared between users and services, which is done by implementing two-factor authentication techniques.

In order to prevent cybersecurity crimes, organizations should also implement advanced security tactics, such as micro-segmentation. Micro-segmentation technologies provide security inside data centers, focusing on the security of the workload. They should be top priority for every organization looking to lower the risk of data breaches and any form of cyber-attack that could put their business and their customers at risk.

You need to carefully plan your cloud security approach, and one way to do that is to provide security as a set of on-demand, scalable services.

Cybersecurity threats are the most talked-about security issues nowadays and every business must be aware of the risks that cyber-attacks carry and the dire consequences they could face if they fall victims to hackers’ actions. Desperate times call for desperate measures, and the time for drastic security measures is now.

By Pavle Dinic

Microsoft Powers Up With Purchase Of Xamarin

Microsoft Powers Up With Purchase Of Xamarin

Microsoft’s Recent Acquisition 

To many tech commentators, the emerging cloud economy looked like it would be dominated by two familiar giants: Google and Amazon. Google recently announced that Spotify would be using its cloud architecture for its backend, while AWS continues to expand and draw players large and small into its vast orbit like a planet with an extraordinary gravitational pull. But recent acquisition news reminds us that there is another player in town with big resources and big ambitions: Microsoft.

The Redwood-based software stalwarts recently acquired Xamarin, the five year old cross-platform development software company run out of San Francisco. The terms of the deal were not disclosed but the New York Times reports that it’s in the region of US$300 million.

Xamarin is a startup that puts mobile first and prides itself on “native mobile development fast [that is] easy, and fun and to help C# developers build beautiful mobile apps and reach billions of devices.”


Scott Guthrie, Microsoft’s VP of cloud and enterprise explained how the incorporation of Xamarin would “improve developers’ ability to build mobile applications across Apple Inc.’s iOS, Google’s Android and Microsoft’s Windows by making it easier to share code among the different operating systems.” The deal boils down to a strong play from Microsoft to bolster its development community to build apps that can run across all major platforms.

The acquisition is not entirely out of the blue. The two companies have a long standing partnership and have worked together on various cloud offerings such as Visual Studio, Microsoft Azure, and the Enterprise Mobility Suite. The acquisition is the clearest sign yet that Microsoft is seeking to be a major cloud player and that it wants to extend beyond its own mobile offerings and onto more successful platforms such as Android and iOS.

The New York Times explains how it sees the move. “A.W.S., Google and Microsoft’s Azure business all rent access to globe-spanning cloud computing systems, each with millions of servers. All are trying to fill them with capabilities that developers can use to build products faster. The point is to get the corporate business into their clouds, and sell additional features once they are there.”

Xamarin CEO Nat Friedman was enthusiastic about the change. “This acquisition is a new beginning for Xamarin—the company and its products—and is an opportunity to help many, many more developers build great apps. Like many of you, I see Microsoft and Xamarin as a perfect fit.

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has made a number of smart moves during his short tenure at the head of the company and this looks to be another. During one of his first press briefings as CEO after just six weeks on the job, Nadella spoke of a mobile first, cloud first world, with Microsoft at the center of it all. The purchase of Xamarin is a chance to bring that reality one step closer.

By Jeremy Daniel

AROUND THE CLOUD: What’s Making Tech News Today

AROUND THE CLOUD: What’s Making Tech News Today

Around The Cloud

Three big stories dominate the web this Tuesday morning and signal huge shifts in the industry landscape; two involving Google and one regarding Apple.

Let’s take a quick look:

Google’s cloud services received a major endorsement with the news that streaming music service Spotify will be moving its technology to the Google Cloud Platform. The Swedish-based leaders in streaming music are not putting all their eggs in one basket, retaining some of the services of Amazon’s CloudFront and Simple Storage Service, but tech blog Engadget reports that “it’s migrating its core computing infrastructure (or its backend), which it uses to store and process data, from its own data centers to Google Cloud Platform.”

Spotify has been effusive in its praise of Google and the work it has put into its cloud infrastructure. “What really tipped the scales towards Google for us, however, has been our experience with Google’s data platform and tools,” said Nicholas Harteau, Spotify VP of Engineering. “Good infrastructure isn’t just about keeping things up and running, it’s about making all of our teams more efficient and more effective, and Google’s data stack does that for us in spades.”

Another Google-owned company, Boston Dynamics unveiled its latest technology, a droid which it is calling Atlas, via a YouTube video which showcases the machine’s capabilities. The company has become well known for the capabilities of its robots and how they respond when kicked or pushed or fall over and this new release is no exception. The robot is seen opening doors, keeping its balance while walking through the snow and picking up 10lb boxes and stacking them on shelves. When it is pushed over it manages to get up quickly and efficiently. Atlas gives us a clear indication of just how close we actually are to having machines that work alongside us in everyday human situations.

Finally, Apple continues to argue that a federal judge has no right to force it to create a software workaround which would sidestep the built-in encryption that is part and parcel of every iPhone. The Cupertino-based tech giants have hired high-profile lawyer Theodore Boutrous, Jr. to argue that it is well within its First Amendment rights to not unlock the phone which was associated with a high-profile terror attack in San Bernadino late last year.

Boutrous told the Los Angeles Times that “”The government here is trying to use this statute from 1789 in a way that it has never been used before. They are seeking a court order to compel Apple to write new software, to compel speech.” He went on to add that “it is not appropriate for the government to obtain through the courts what they couldn’t get through the legislative process.

The company will formally file its response to the court order this Friday.

By Jeremy Daniel

2016 Connected Enterprises Report

2016 Connected Enterprises Report

Connected Enterprises Report

Dimension Data’s 2016 Connected Enterprise Report is out, discussing collaboration trends, insights, and strategies in the digital age. With the promise of lower costs coupled with greater productivity, increased agility and better customer engagement, collaboration technologies are providing tools for real-time communication, file sharing, project management, and social networking which benefit product development, competition response, employee efficiency and more.

Connected Enterprise Report - Infographic_001

Fundamental Discoveries

  • 40% of organizations lack a defined unified communication and collaboration strategy.
  • Increased productivity is the most important collaboration strategy (19%), and increased sales the second (14%).
  • Only a paltry 4% of organizations use return on investment (ROI) as the primary assessment of collaboration technology success.
  • One out of four IT departments measure collaboration project success on the implementation of the technology rather than how well it’s used and adopted, with 17% or organizations not implementing collaboration training programs, and 16% of travel policies remaining unchanged and thus offering no encouragement to utilize collaboration tools.
  • A massive 81% of enterprises believe collaboration has enhanced customer engagement and improved customer service.
  • While 88% of organizations say decision-making processes have been improved through collaboration, many struggle to leverage collaboration to improve their competitive positioning.
  • Though currently only 20-25% of enterprises rely on hosted collaboration services, nearly a third of IT departments consider moving unified communication and collaboration to the cloud to be the most significant technology trend influencing their collaboration strategies.
  • The majority of businesses combine line of business and IT insights when selecting, purchasing, and implementing collaboration technology.

Productivity, Teamwork, and Profit


These top objectives for collaborative enterprises rely on streamlined communications which make it easier for employees to interact from anywhere, at any time, via any device, and through any app, breaking down both organizational and geographical barriers and allowing people to share knowledge and quickly take action. Contact centers using collaboration tools are also better able to facilitate communication and teamwork, ensuring improved customer service, while the reduced need for air travel and hotel expenses lowers costs significantly in global organizations without the loss of face-to-face interaction.

The top five single most important objectives of collaboration are:

  • Improve individual employee productivity;
  • Improve sales/revenue;
  • Accelerate decision-making;
  • Reduce business expenses;
  • Improve teamwork among employees.

Cloud Migration

With the cloud now essential to most businesses, cloud technology is the principle platform allowing enterprises to deploy applications efficiently, cost-effectively, and at scale, and migrating collaboration applications to the cloud has become central to many enterprises’ abilities to make collaboration technology available to the greatest number of users in the most cost-effective way. Top technology trends affecting most organizations’ collaboration strategies are:

  • Adopting collaboration applications as hosted services, rather than deployed on-premise – 27% of IT departments consider this to be the most important trend affecting their collaboration strategies.
  • Adopting collaboration applications via a subscription model, rather than more traditional licensing – 14% of IT departments consider this the most important trend.
  • Moving collaboration applications to private data centers, rather than running them on dedicated hardware – 10% of IT departments believe this to be the most important trend.

The many reasons for moving collaboration to the cloud are an assorted set of strategic, operational, and financial motivations, but significantly observed is the potentially lower costs of cloud (at least initially), and when adopted as a hosted service, these costs can become operational rather than capital expenses. Furthermore, administration and updating of applications is easier in the cloud, ensuring less onerous management processes. Those with an organization-wide cloud strategy in place are likely to take the cloud direction for their collaboration applications, but currently, 75% of collaboration applications are deployed on-premise, and so it will still be some years before many enterprises entirely migrate collaboration technology to the cloud.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

Protecting Devices From Data Breach: Identity of Things (IDoT)

How to Identify and Authenticate in the Expanding IoT Ecosystem

It is a necessity to protect IoT devices and their associated data. As the IoT ecosystem continues to expand, the need to create an identity to newly-connected things is becoming increasingly crucial. These ‘things’ can include anything from basic sensors and gateways to industrial controls systems, retail terminals and scanners, and kiosks to medical devices, heating and lighting systems, connected homes, and smart cars.

Identity and authentication for the IoT enables the use of foundational information security concepts, including confidentiality, integrity, availability, authentication, and non-repudiation. At the core, identity binds credentials. It allows an operator to well manage IoT devices, define access, set policies, and secure communications to protect devices and data. But within the Identity of Things (IDoT), how does one clearly define the credential and the accompanying authentication and encryption services?

Identity and Access Management

The Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) first raised this issue back in September 2015 when the organization released a Summary Guidance on Identity and Access Management (IAM) for the IoT. Within the document, the CSA emphasized the importance of properly identifying things in order to enable authentication, encryption, and data integrity in an ecosystem. Currently, there are more than 20 different study groups, consortiums, alliances, and standards initiatives working toward creating a secure framework for the IDoT.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Issues such as scale, power and computational constraints, ruggedized requirements, energy limitations, increased number and variation of connectivity protocols, and cost factors, among others, make it difficult to simply impose a legacy enterprise IAM or credential management solution. Furthermore, while scenarios for IoT authentication are numerous, there are three notable challenges: token-based authentication currently only works for HTTP, symmetric key mechanisms require input at manufacture, and standard Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) is generally considered impracticable for constrained environments.

Cybersecurity Obstacles 

The three obstacles are ones the cybersecurity industry is working diligently to overcome. For token-based authentication, new methods need to be devised for all the new connectivity vectors (cellular, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, NFC, RFID, etc.), either as one, convergent authentication method or one for each vector. Both approaches will require significant research and development.


Alternatively, and with some modifications, symmetric key mechanisms can be adapted for the IDoT. For example, Digital Short Range Communications (DSRC), used in vehicle-to-vehicle communications, supports a much smaller certificate structure than the standard X.509. Meanwhile, the use of certificates requires some form of central mechanisms and management structure, such as PKI. In fact, many (and notably certification authorities) tout PKI as the contending standard for identification, encryption, and authentication of IoT devices, but traditional PKI does not scale well for the IoT. A more dynamic key architecture may need to be developed. Essentially the method chosen will depend on the constrained devices in question and their respective environment.

From a private sector perspective, a number of firms are already promoting authentication, identity, and related management services to address the challenges head-on. The movement in the private sector is dynamic, with numerous firms—from startups to big players in the enterprise IAM and authentication and key management space—investing in the IoT market. While some are offering data-centric security platforms for IoT and M2M, others are developing cloud-based IoT security platforms to create and manage digital identities. The solutions are wide-ranging and varied.

In all, the IDoT market opportunity is still nascent, but it is evidently expanding quickly. Most pressing is the development of adapted identity solutions. These solutions will need to revolve around data centric encryption, dynamic certificates and key architecture.

By Michela Menting

Will GPS, The Cloud, And The IoT Enable A New Level Of Mass-surveillance?

Will GPS, The Cloud, And The IoT Enable A New Level Of Mass-surveillance?

New Levels of Mass-surveillance?

There’s a dark cloud hanging over the cloud. Recently, US security chief James Clapper blithely revealed that the government “could” use the Internet of Things for civilian surveillance.

Given the heightened alarm caused by domestic terrorism, I take it the word ‘will’ is more applicable than ‘could’ in this case. If the FBI is capable of making the chilling’ request that Apple build a backdoor into the iPhone, it’s capable of requesting the same of the IoT. Tim Cook makes a fine point when he says bad actors would find means of encrypting iOS to circumvent the backdoor. This mirrors a point I will make about surveillance and the IoT.


(Infographic Source:

But first, how did we get here? Are the IoT and the cloud on which we store data a Trojan horse, a way of sneaking constant government surveillance into our lives?

In terms of the IoT, I’d like to argue it all began with a technology we sometimes take for granted: GPS. The US government started the Global Positioning System project in 1973. It has enabled a variety of innovations that are precursors to the IoT. In turn, the IoT may enable a whole new level of government surveillance.


GPS is essentially a web of 32 satellites that collect geographic and chronological data, transmitting it via radio waves to antennae, monitors, and receivers on the ground.

First, satellites communicate with a Control Segment, which consists of several master control stations, four antennae, and six monitor stations.

The Control Segment sends signals to the User Segment, which consists of hundreds of thousands of receivers in the hands of military, scientific, commercial, and civil personnel worldwide.

Finally, the civilian segment employs the accurate locational and chronological data for everything from astronomy to automotive navigation.

GPS and private sector innovation

Before 1996, any sort of private sector GPS-related business involved contracting with the military. Then, Bill Clinton made the network available to civilians. But the signal wasn’t very reliable until 2000, when Clinton discontinued ‘selective availability’, which scrambles the signal.

The government originally had selective availability in place for security reasons. After Clinton cut it, Geocaching, invented by a GPS enthusiast named Dave Ulmer, helped popularize GPS with consumers. The combination of metal detecting and Geocaching is an early example of the technological synthesis that characterizes the IoT.


GPS receivers began popping up in cars, mounted on the dashboard or rearview mirror. In 2004, Qualcomm succeeded in integrating GPS with mobile phones. That same year, Dutch company TomTom invented the PND (Personal Navigation Device), a touchscreen GPS unit with software that prefigured smartphone GPS apps.

Google debuted its free navigation system for Android in 2009. By then, stand-alone GPS from the likes of Garmin and TomTom had lost out to apps. These brands then began to market premium navigation apps for iOS and Android. Meanwhile, brands were discovering they could mine user location data, paying apps for the wealth of data accumulating on the cloud.

Some auto manufacturers also began incorporating onboard GPS, and the possibility of the autonomous car, one of the harbingers of the IoT, started to look real. Gig startups such as Uber and Lyft developed apps that depend to a great extent on GPS. Automated tractors from brands such as John Deere, Case IH, and New Holland have been mobile since 2008.

In Finland, Volvo is using GPS to warn drivers about the location of herds of elk. The warning system incorporates GPS tracking, animal-vehicle collision statistics, and analysis of wildlife movement patterns. If and when the roads become smart roads, as would be the case with the IoT, sensors in the road and other locations could relay data about elk to the cloud, where it would then be analyzed in combination with GPS data to provide an alert to the driver—or to the autonomous vehicle.

Geolocation apps such as Foursquare, Gowalla, and Brightkite are bringing A-GPS (Assisted GPS, which uses cell-sites and, sometimes, Wi-Fi networks to triangulate with satellites for greater accuracy) into the social realm. These apps incorporate location check-ins, social networking, events, and games in an effort to make GPS fun.

GPS, the IoT and government surveillance

Each smartphone, and any smart device, has a GPS chip in it. In my opinion, GPS is the baseline enabling technology for the IoT. Because of it, we realized we could track objects with radio waves—thus RFID. Other specialized sensors, such as optical tags and quick response codes, only need to be added to provide qualitative information. And of course Wi-Fi is in the mix.

If the FBI succeeds in using the All Writs Act of 1789 to break Apple’s encryption, it will set a precedent for the IoT as a massive surveillance tool. Since the IoT is essentially a network of GPS-enabled smart objects, the FBI will know exactly where we are at all times. Information we store on the cloud would be fair game, too.

The FBI’s argument is that they want to hack smartphones to catch the bad guys. Why do we have to be so concerned about our privacy when this would go towards deterring crime?

The principle of privacy, that’s why. And criminals will be aware of government surveillance. Terrorists will know that to remain undetected they’ll need to remain off the smart network or implement additional encryption. As we’re seeing with groups such as Isis, they’re technologically savvy. They would only need to train and hire good hackers.

We’re now witnessing an era when the private sector innovations with GPS, the cloud, and IoT may become tools for government use. It all hangs in the balance as the IoT advances.

By Daniel Matthews

The Lurking Threat Called Passivity

The Lurking Threat Called Passivity

The Lurking Threat

What is lurking inside your company’s systems that is making them vulnerable to attack? Hacking, phishing and other types of attacks are often considered to be externally driven, with gangs of anonymous hackers operating from halfway around the world using Internet connections to break in and wreak havoc. But surprisingly, a significant proportion of network security events happen on the inside. Depending on the particular organization or industry, this percentage can range from 35% to 90%. In addition, a significant portion of the vulnerability of any system starts passively—in other words, with features and items that are not active viruses or cracking tools, but whose mere presence eats away at the defenses.


Consider busy employees. They have lots to do, and constant distractions pull their attention away from practicing proper computer hygiene. In their haste to get to a meeting or catch a flight, laptops are lost, phones get misplaced and USB drives are borrowed. As convenient as these devices are, much of the data and documentation stored on them is unencrypted. Few people ever choose to assign a password to a Microsoft Word file; it takes too much time. The same goes for other types of passwords, too. It is time-consuming and annoying to change them every two weeks, especially if they are difficult to remember. A proper password should be a string of 16 or more essentially unintelligible characters, but most of us just don’t like to do that.

Dormant Data

Then there are those who are simply not around anymore. People leave, some get fired and others simply get promoted or move elsewhere. This results in many dormant user accounts lurking in the depths of the system. Still more accounts may never have been activated. They sit there, with their default passwords invisible due to inactivity, a fertile place for sophisticated thieves to set up shop and establish a back door.


(Image Source:

Some employees access files, directories or other areas by accident, assigning documents to the wrong drives, clicking on the wrong link or simply not knowing what they are doing. Such mistakes are not the fault of the individual. Many people have never been able to bring their degree of computer literacy up to an adequate level. Even those who are familiar with password changing regimens, and who do not use a stranger’s USB drives, may be unaware of sinister activities such as Wi-Fi website spoofing, for example. This happens when the free Wi-Fi login for an honest-to-goodness coffee shop is replaced or overshadowed by a sophisticated reproduction working in the same hotspot, inviting workers to share everything on their mobile devices with them.

These actions may fly under the radar, especially when security does not or cannot maintain sufficient definitions of “correct” or “normal” activity on a network. Security specialists themselves often do not have the resources to adequately police internal activities, even when a budget has been established.

Malignant Operators

It is evident that none of these human-sourced weaknesses are the result of a specific virus or action. They are generally passive in nature, relying on the fact that people are both goodhearted and under great pressure. However, these activities are the types that offer safe harbor to malignant operators, who either hack in and sniff out these soft spaces or already work within the organization and are intent on sabotage or espionage.

Network security will always be an ongoing battle. The enemy is relentless. That’s why a strategy must come from the top. It should focus not solely on technical solutions, but also on human elements such as time management, planning and communication, backed up with adequate and ongoing training. For as distanced as these soft skills seem to be from the digital world of computers, they are the levers by which the bad guys force open a crack and move inside.

For more on this topic, go to, sponsored by Hewlett Packard Enterprise.

By Steve Prentice

How To Use Big Data And Analytics To Help Consumers

How To Use Big Data And Analytics To Help Consumers

Big Data Analytics

Businesses are under increasing pressure to develop data-driven solutions. The competitive advantage gained by a successful strategy can be immense. It can create new opportunities and help businesses to react to different scenarios or sudden changes in the market. But innovation and resilience are not easily achieved, and organizations always face difficult decisions about what data to collect and how to leverage insights effectively.

Even today, companies are still unsure about how to use the data they collect, with differences between C-suite executives reflecting wider organizational divisions. But, by looking at organizations that use data and analytics to identify and help consumers successfully, a few useable insights emerge.

Think Big, Start Small

The scale and technical challenges involved in big data and analytics projects can be a problem, especially when paired with lofty expectations and the high fixed costs involved in research and development. These barriers can make it difficult for small companies to keep pace with larger ones who have bigger budgets and access to the latest technology.


One way that small and big companies alike can exploit the disruptive potential of big data analytics is by starting small, with a clear focus on a single area and application. By increasing – and demonstrating – the value of big data and analytics in one area, such as customer support and relationship management (CRM), before moving on to the other applications, you can build expertise and understanding, with the benefits filtering down to other parts of the organization bit by bit.

Invest in Talent

Lack of talent is one of the main obstacles faced by small and medium-sized businesses looking to implement big data and analytics strategies. Many struggle to find people with the high-level skills necessary to conceive and run a big data and analytics project. With technical expertise a prerequisite for success, it’s no surprise that organizations with the largest budgets tend to attract much of the best talent. Online giants like Amazon, whose recommendation engine is a standout example of the potential of big data, or new peer-to-peer companies like Uber with sophisticated data-driven models and large pots of venture capital, find it easier to innovate and stay ahead.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

Smaller B2C companies need to ensure they overcome the skills shortage by adopting a variety of carefully targeted measures. Here the importance of arranging external or internal technical training for existing staff, and creating a data-driven culture in which analytics informs understanding of customer demand, should be underlined. This may mean turning to consultants or contract employees, at least in the short term, to build internal resources through the transfer of knowledge and expertise.

Overcome Security Challenges

Any commercial strategy that involves the collection and analysis of data is going to raise security concerns. The capacity to capture and analyze customer data is one thing, the technical expertise to keep this information secure is another. In an environment where any breach or loss of data can leave a business’s reputation irrevocably damaged, there is pressing need to invest in data encryption and information security, and for any security strategy to have broad support across the organization.


Trust and privacy concerns may persist, however. For these to be addressed, businesses need to adopt a raft of measures designed to establish and build trust. On the one hand, these will involve outward-looking measures to do with communication and transparency; but, on the other, these must be based on solid internal processes, including – but not confined to – the implementation of compliance mechanisms, codes of conduct and company values.

The Potential of Big Data and Analytics

Having outlined what it can take to make big data work, and suggested the challenges that must be overcome, we are left asking: ‘Is it worth it?’ A concrete example can help to illustrate the potential for big data to generate increased revenues and improved customer experience. Supply shortages, poor on-time delivery and inaccurate sales forecasts are significant problems for technology manufacturers, leading to bottlenecking and, ultimately, higher prices. By using big data and analytics to improve the sophistication and accuracy of sales forecasts, manufactures can ensure their products are consistently available and on-time, and at prices that are genuinely competitive.

By George Foot

CloudTweaks Comics
Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Security, Security, Security!! Get use to it as we’ll be hearing more and more of this in the coming years. Collaborative security efforts from around the world must start as sometimes it feels there is a sense of Fait Accompli, that it’s simply too late to feel safe in this digital age. We may not…

Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms Above DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms, malware is the most common incident that security teams reported responding to in 2014, according to a recent survey from SANS Institute and late-stage security startup AlienVault. The average cost of a data breach? $3.5 million, or $145 per sensitive…

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks!

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks!

The Conflict Of Net Neutrality And DDoS-Attacks! So we are all cheering as the FCC last week made the right choice in upholding the principle of net neutrality! For the general public it is a given that an ISP should be allowed to charge for bandwidth and Internet access but never to block or somehow…

Update: Timeline of the Massive DDoS DYN Attacks

Update: Timeline of the Massive DDoS DYN Attacks

DYN DDOS Timeline This morning at 7am ET a DDoS attack was launched at Dyn (the site is still down at the minute), an Internet infrastructure company whose headquarters are in New Hampshire. So far the attack has come in 2 waves, the first at 11.10 UTC and the second at around 16.00 UTC. So…

Multi-Cloud Integration Has Arrived

Multi-Cloud Integration Has Arrived

Multi-Cloud Integration Speed, flexibility, and innovation require multiple cloud services As businesses seek new paths to innovation, racing to market with new features and products, cloud services continue to grow in popularity. According to Gartner, 88% of total compute will be cloud-based by 2020, leaving just 12% on premise. Flexibility remains a key consideration, and…

Micro-segmentation – Protecting Advanced Threats Within The Perimeter

Micro-segmentation – Protecting Advanced Threats Within The Perimeter

Micro-segmentation Changing with the times is frequently overlooked when it comes to data center security. The technology powering today’s networks has become increasingly dynamic, but most data center admins still employ archaic security measures to protect their network. These traditional security methods just don’t stand a chance against today’s sophisticated attacks. That hasn’t stopped organizations…

Digital Transformation: Not Just For Large Enterprises Anymore

Digital Transformation: Not Just For Large Enterprises Anymore

Digital Transformation Digital transformation is the acceleration of business activities, processes, and operational models to fully embrace the changes and opportunities of digital technologies. The concept is not new; we’ve been talking about it in one way or another for decades: paperless office, BYOD, user experience, consumerization of IT – all of these were stepping…

The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

The Cloud Is Not Enough! Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions

Why Businesses Need Hybrid Solutions Running a cloud server is no longer the novel trend it once was. Now, the cloud is a necessary data tier that allows employees to access vital company data and maintain productivity from anywhere in the world. But it isn’t a perfect system — security and performance issues can quickly…

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Once upon a time, only a select few companies like Google and Salesforce possessed the knowledge and expertise to operate efficient cloud infrastructure and applications. Organizations patronizing those companies benefitted with apps that offered new benefits in flexibility, scalability and cost effectiveness. These days, the sharp division between cloud and on-premises infrastructure…

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Revenue Imperatives “Follow the money” is always a good piece of advice, but in today’s recurring revenue-driven market, “follow the customer” may be more powerful. Two recurring revenue imperatives highlight the importance of responding to, and cherishing customer interactions. Technology and competitive advantage influence the final two. If you’re part of the movement towards recurring…

Which Is Better For Your Company: Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment?

Which Is Better For Your Company: Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment?

Cloud-Based or On-Premise ERP Deployment? You know how enterprise resource management (ERP) can improve processes within your supply chain, and the things to keep in mind when implementing an ERP system. But do you know if cloud-based or on-premise ERP deployment is better for your company or industry? While cloud computing is becoming more and…


Sponsored Partners