What To Do When You've Outgrown Your Basic Business Software

Basic Business Software

You know that feeling. You have multiple business products that aren’t communicating, meaning your employees are doing more work, uploading redundant data into different systems. The software is sluggish and can’t be accessed via browser. You’re paying per user, which is starting to get painful. In short, your business is growing, and your basic software can’t keep up. It’s taken you this far, but now you need to move on. So what’s next?

More customers, more employees, and more complex automation requirements all mean you need a more robust business management system. Implementing a new system can seem daunting, but there are some steps you can take to make the process a bit less painful.

1. Determine the return on investment

While you don’t want to wait until the system you’ve outgrown is bursting at the seams, you’ll want to break down the return on investment (ROI) you can expect from a new business management system. It is an investment, both in terms of money and resources. However, your current system may be costing you more in productivity, poor customer service, under- or overstocked inventory, and so on. In addition to fixing these issues, a new system may also automate tasks and provide better reporting, giving you a more comprehensive view of your business and allowing you to make more strategic decisions. You’ll want to figure out if your old software is costing you more than the price of a new system.

2. Get everyone on board

New business management software may affect more than the accounting department. Bring members of each department together to discuss their pain points. What tasks could be automated? Is there a way to reduce errors? Answering these questions will help you pinpoint which features are must-haves for your new system. Perhaps there’s a certain report that would make someone in customer service’s life easier. Keep in mind that your particular industry may have quirks that require special features, such as the ability to handle multiple currencies.

3. Narrow the field

Based on your must-have features and your industry’s special requirements, your list of potential vendors will shrink. You’ll also want to think about the size of your business — both today and in the future. What’s right for a Fortune 500 company might not be right for you.

4. Do a compatibility check

Your new system should fit your business; you shouldn’t have to adapt to it. You may have some software in place that is essential to your business. Can you migrate your existing data? Will your new system be able to communicate with it? Quality business management solutions allow you to integrate everything from customer service to accounting to supply chains. As your business changes, can you add and remove features? You’ll want to understand the customizations available for companies like yours.

5. Think about technology

Whether you’re deploying On-Premises, in the cloud, or through software-as-a-service, you’ll want to research which method works best for your company. There are positives and drawbacks with any, so it’s all about what makes sense for you. Does your vendor let you make the switch between these options? What works for you today might hold you back in the future. You’ll also want to keep in mind what databases and operating systems the solution supports.

6. Think about the future

Upgrades are going to happen. Talk to your potential vendors about how they handle the process, how frequently they occur, and whether you can decided to opt or delay an upgrade if it will be too disruptive.

7. Take stock of training and support

In an ideal world, all business solutions would be intuitive and easy to use. Until that’s the case, evaluate how closely everyday tasks align with your old system and inquire about training, classes, documentation, videos, and demos. After training is over and the check’s been cashed, will someone still be there to support you?

8. Look for flaws

No system will meet 100 percent of your needs, but you’ll want to know what a system can’t do for you before you go all in. Speaking of problems, how does the system handle errors? Does it flag unusual requests? What happens if a customer is entered into the system twice? You’ll want a good sense of how the software handles errors — which are bound to happen in the real world.

9. Go global

It’s a global economy; don’t let your business management solution stop you from taking advantage. Find one that supports multiple languages and currencies, while helping you keep track of local laws and customs.

10. Consider the cloud

If you and your employees are always on the go, you may want to consider a solution that lets you work from anywhere or simply helps you collaborate better. With cloud-based software, it’s easy to work on any device with a browser, even tablets and smartphones.

By Jon Roskill

Tunio Zafer

The Evolution of Data File Sharing

Data File Sharing Whether due to a lack of time, need or simply because email started at such an advanced stage, digital data-transfer systems have not progressed as far as physical delivery system. Centuries ago, ...
Paperspace

10 Influential Cloud Gaming Platforms of 2021

Cloud Gaming Platforms The cloud gaming niche is becoming popular for the same reasons services like Netlflix, Hulu and YouTube also are: the user only requires access to the internet to enjoy gaming technology and ...
Mike Brown

Robo Advisors and the Investment Management Industry

The Future of Robo Advisors Robo advisors are on the rise and they are winning in the investment management industry. When they made their appearance on the market, they were thought to be the thing ...
Staeadfast

Episode 5: How the Pandemic is Changing Business and the Cloud

An Interview with Ed Dryer of Steadfast With the global pandemic wreaking havoc on business and society, everything is changing. Ed Dryer, Senior Technology Strategist at Steadfast Networks, which specializes in Colocation, Managed Infrastructure as ...
12 Cybersecurity CEOs On What Each Learned Leading During The Pandemic

12 Cybersecurity CEOs On What Each Learned Leading During The Pandemic

Cybersecurity CEOs’ lessons learned from navigating the pandemic provide a valuable framework for leading and growing a business through anxious, uncertain times. How each cybersecurity CEO responds to the challenges of keeping employees safe, customers ...
Brian Day

Tips for Developing Apps In a Cloud Environment

DevOps and the Cloud Unless you’ve just started a brand-new organization, your IT environment is currently running a diverse collection of last-generation and older applications that were deployed with the one-application-per-server approach that unleashed the ...