Category Archives: Big Data

Startups To Have Reached $1 Billion Valuation In Record Time

Startups To Have Reached $1 Billion Valuation In Record Time

Startups $1 Billion Valuation

Not a lot of startups are resilient enough to vanquish the initial challenges and reach $1 billion valuation, also known as the “unicorn” status. But some of them eventually manage to get there a lot faster than others. A couple of years ago Dan Price wrote about how Venture Capitalists are using big data analytics to spot potential investment plays.

For those who are regularly involved with SMEs, venture capital, and company valuations, it is common knowledge that start-ups that exit for more than $1 billion dollars are extremely rare – often termed ‘unicorn’ companies.

Despite their rarity, it should come as no surprise that venture capitalists are very keen to identify them at the earliest possible stage. The problem is that it is much easier said than done. Traditionally, locating, predicting and investing in unicorn companies has required a lot of time and effort; a good investment could reap huge rewards, whereas a poor investment could cause bankruptcy, yet a good VC that could maximise returns consistently was hard to find…

When the term “unicorn” was first coined around 2002-2003, only a few startups could qualify for that prestigious and rather enviable title. While finding the actual number of unicorns in existence today is a rather herculean task, there is no second opinion on the fact that those belonging to the tech variety have been increasing in number at a rather exponential rate.

Infographics below have been discovered via Visualcapitalist.

Unicorn Births Per Year


The Fastest Startups


By Brent Anderson

Plugging Into The New AWS Database Migration Service

Plugging Into The New AWS Database Migration Service

Amazon Expands AWS Database Migration Service

Earlier this week Amazon Web Services (AWS) has announced that the company’s new AWS Database Migration Service, previously available as a preview, is now available to all its customers.

The new service, as claimed by the company, will make it a lot easier for businesses to migrate their databases to AWS. Not only that, the company also boasts that the new service enables firms to do away with the otherwise pesky and time-consuming migration processes in less than 10 minutes.

Since Jan 1 this year, the AWS Database Migration Service has facilitated the migration of more than 1,000 databases from a number of enterprises including the likes of Pegasystems and Expedia.

Hal BerensonHundreds of customers moved more than a thousand of their on-premises databases to Amazon Aurora, other Amazon RDS engines, or databases running on Amazon EC2 during the preview of the AWS Database Migration Service,” Hal Berenson, vice president of Relational Database Services AWS, said in a statement.

According to AWS, the new migration service is a fully managed service that enables the migration of production Oracle, MySQL, SQL Server, PostgreSQL, and MariaDB databases from on-premises data centers to AWS cloud.

The company further claims that the migration service is really simple to use as it does not require any drivers or applications, and neither does it demand for any alteration in the source database (except for under a select few environments).

You can begin a database migration with just a few clicks in the AWS Management Console,” reads the AWS Database Migration Service product page. Once the migration process begins, AWS manages every complication that arises during the process, including automatically replicating data changes that may occur in the source database.

The cost of the new service depends on the size of the data to be migrated. However, Amazon has clarified that it could be as low as $3 per terabyte. Adding more to the deal, AWS has also assured its customers that there will be very little downtime through the entire process.

The AWS Database Migration Service can be accessed using the AWS Management Console. It is currently available only in the following regions: East (N. Virginia), US-West (Oregon), US-West (N. California), EU (Ireland), EU (Frankfurt), Asia Pacific (Singapore), Asia Pacific (Sydney), and Asia Pacific (Tokyo) Regions.

Amazon promises to further expand the geographic reach of this new service in the coming months.

In a related news, AWS celebrated its 10th anniversary earlier this week. The company which came into existence as a side venture of the American eCommerce heavyweight has so far made a rather enviable progress by taking on over 1 million active customers across 190 countries.

Despite being challenged by other notable stakeholders in the cloud services industry including the likes of the IBM, AWS has paved its way into a dominant position and currently boasts itself as a $7.3 billion business, as reported by the TechCrunch.

By Brent Anderson

How To Develop A Business Continuity Plan Using Internet Performance Management

How To Develop A Business Continuity Plan Using Internet Performance Management

Internet Performance Management Planning

CDN Performance Series Provided By Dyn

In our previous post, we laid out the problems of business continuity and Internet Performance Management in today’s online environment. 

In this article, we will take a look at some of the ways you can use traffic steering capabilities to execute business continuity planning and provide some ideas on how proper use of Internet Performance Management can help you leverage the Internet and the capabilities of cloud-based services.

Leveraging The Internet

Effective Internet Performance Management means leveraging the Internet to your advantage-through proper visibility, planning, monitoring and action, and refusing to be held hostage by “Internet issues”, which seem to be beyond your control. The key is to see, understand, and assess Internet conditions in real time so that you are able to react and plan best-fit routing and react to bottlenecks that cause such widespread service degradation. Actionable insights into Internet routing options make all the difference when you want to deliver excellent service via the Internet.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

One of the first steps in developing a solid business continuity plan is to ensure redundancy at every level of your infrastructure, including your hosting locations, CDNs, and DNS services. Redundancy removes your dependency on any single point of failure, which could lead to widespread outages. With hosting locations and CDNs, redundancy may be accomplished by replicating your application across multiple locations within a single provider, or bringing in multiple providers to increase your options in the event of infrastructure problems. From the DNS standpoint, a secondary DNS network ensures end users are always able to reach your online infrastructure, regardless of where it may be located.

Global research firm Gartner summed it up succinctly: “Without properly functioning external DNS, Internet-based resources may “disappear” without warning. For enterprises with Web and cloud-based applications and content, external DNS solutions offer reliability, performance and traffic management beyond that of traditional open-source-based solutions.

Once you’ve ensured you have redundancy across all levels of your infrastructure, you’ll want to ensure end users get routed to the location that’s best able to deliver a positive experience. Today’s webpages are becoming increasingly complex and distributed, requiring content to be downloaded from several locations for every page load. 


Each of these requests for content creates an opportunity to improve the end user’s experience, but also introduces the risk of creating a negative experience.

It’s important to identify where the end user is located, and then which infrastructure selections are best situated to deliver content to that location. By implementing an Internet Performance Management solution, you can monitor all of your infrastructure so that end users are only sent to locations that are available to respond to requests and topologically near the end user so that the actual download of content and assets is minimized as much as possible. Proper planning and monitoring of this internet-dependent infrastructure can help you tackle business objectives such as reducing cost, mitigating risk and increasing revenue.

Advanced Tools and Monitoring

Dyn, an Internet Performance Management company, delivers a platform solution capable of providing both simple and advanced internet routing tools and monitoring, personalized for the demands of your business. Dyn’s platform rests on three interdependent pillars: Traffic steering, data collection, and an analytical decision making engine. This is a strong foundation. Their traffic steering relies on 15 years of experience, a world-class DNS network, and 20 physical locations around the world capable of providing load balancing, failover, and dynamic steering capabilities that optimize end user reachability and performance. The data collection is peerless, with over 200 vantage points collecting 6B latency measurements daily and API hooks that allow you to ingest this data into your monitoring tools. Last but not least, the analytical engine has a suite of Internet intelligence products to turn rich data into actionable insights.

If you want to achieve improved Internet performance on a large scale, then you would be well served to employ a cloud-based Internet Performance Management solution that can accelerate resolution of issues, scale globally, provide strong security and easy to use API’s for superior performance.

In the next post of this series we will uncover real examples on how Business Continuity plans can drastically influence business success.

By Jeremy Daniel

Tweaking Your SaaS Marketing To Instill Startup Growth

Tweaking Your SaaS Marketing To Instill Startup Growth

SaaS Marketing Growth

Primarily evidenced by the explosive growth several startups have managed, growth hacking is a successful development tool that’s achieved some acclaim in the last few years. One reason that startups specifically have been making use of growth hacking is the smaller budgets they contend with compelling a ‘ship and revise’ strategy. These startups will often send out their initial products early on, encourage early adopters to provide rigorous feedback, and then refine their products. Large, established organizations tend, instead, to consume hefty budgets for traditional marketing and launches, but this often means customers aren’t getting the functionality they want. And so, taking a leaf out of the startup book of marketing, most organizations could benefit from growth hacking and its accompanying devices.

Boiling Down Growth Hacking

Growth hacks are shortcuts or loopholes to growth, usually extremely high growth, of new products. They are low cost, often free, and rely on word of mouth. The best growth hacks take full advantage of digital and social media and go viral through satisfied users spreading the word. Data analysis, user feedback, and growth objectives are key to growth hacking, and just as effective implementation can mean tremendous success, so poor execution could end in disaster. Netflix, Twitter, Dropbox, Uber, Airbnb, Slack – all Cloud based SaaS examples of brands that have successfully hacked their growth. The list of failures is harder to dig up, but undoubtedly much longer.  

Below is an infographic discovered via pierrelechelle covering Slack’s growth which has now reached over 1 million active users with no end in site.


When Growth Hacking Doesn’t Work

Considering its ideals of creativity and ingenuity, growth hacking can be a risky device. Though they often seem like cheap and easy solutions, many growth hacks fizzle out long before they provide the necessary boost to the business. Three core hazards stand out:

  • They’re only there for the freebies

Getting the customers to your site is, of course, an essential goal, but if they’re just window shopping, your hacks aren’t successful. Without enough paying customers, no amount of positive word of mouth will do you any good, so be sure to turn visitors into committed subscribers. Website design is one quick-fix strategy for improving conversion rates, keeping navigation neat and intuitive, and including accessible copy. Make sure you’ve included one strong call to action that allows customers to spread the word via social media and ensure your sign-up is quick and easy.

  • Stats just aren’t your thing

If you’re not correctly measuring campaign results and then using that information to refine your efforts you’re wasting time and money. Fruitful growth hackers embrace a trial and error mindset that views failures as that paving stones to success and avidly experiment with their hacks. Track data, measure results, and answer questions; set a measurable goal and track your progress. A successful campaign provides data for scaling up the next campaign; a ‘failed’ campaign shows you how to adapt your next one.

  • A lead balloon

Creating hype is essential, but no amount of growth hacking hype can make a bad product look good. Quite the opposite. Growth hacking relies on positive consumer feedback, and if you’re delivering a product or service that disappoints, prospective users will vanish. Some suggest a 95% product investment, 5% marketing investment, ensuring your product is the best it can be, and organizations need to honestly and realistically evaluate product strengths and weaknesses so that they’re ready to work on the feedback they get. Growth hacking is valued by marketers and consumers alike because it is based on candid product communication and a loyal user base.

By Jennifer Klostermann

Most Active Internet Of Things Investors In The Last 5 Years

Most Active Internet Of Things Investors In The Last 5 Years

Most Active Internet Of Things Investors

A recent BI Intelligence report claimed that the Internet of Things (IoT) is on its way to becoming the largest device market in the world.

Quite naturally, such exponential growth of the IoT market has prompted a number of high-profile corporate investors and smart money VCs to bet highly on this comparatively still nascent industry.


A recently discovered CB Insight report via Twitter stated that the funding of  IoT startups has more than doubled over the last five years. Amongst the most active IoT startup investors since 2010 were Intel Capital at number one, followed by Qualcomm Ventures at the second spot.

Interestingly, the venture arms of both the tech giants have been particularly focused on sensor companies and wearable startups. Industry observers are of the view that because their core business model is heavily reliant on the design and manufacture of ever-smaller chips that power, both Intel and Qualcomm are more inclined to see IoT startups as strategic assets.

In 2015, Intel Capital led a particularly successful round to BodyLabs, a startup that deals in 3D body-scanning sensors. Apart from that, the company invested in Sano Intelligence, another fast-growing developer of biometric sensors.

Other IoT infrastructure startups that bagged rather lucrative investments from Intel Capital include Bocom Intelligent Network Technologies, SigFox, and Stratoscale.

Similarly, Qualcomm Ventures have also been showing great interest in emerging brands such as drone manufacturer 3D Robotics and Whistle Labs, a dog wearable manufacturer. In addition, the company also have invested in sensor networks made by Placemeter, Panoramic Power and Streetline.

Foundry Group and KPCB made it to the third rank in the list of top IoT investors. While Foundry Group seemed particularly focused on hardware manufacturers such as Fitbit, MakerBot and LittleBits, KPCB has been investing across a diverse range of IoT niches including auto, home automation, as well as wearables.

By Brent Anderson

4 Industries Being Transformed By The Internet of Things

4 Industries Being Transformed By The Internet of Things

Compelling IoT Industries

Every year, more and more media organizations race to predict the trends that will come to shape the online landscape over the next twelve months. Many of these are wild and outlandish and should be consumed with a pinch of salt, yet others stand out for their sober and well-researched judgements.

Online business publication Business Insider has a solid track record in the game of predictions, and there are some extremely interesting predictions with regard to the Internet of Things (IoT) and the ways that it is shaking up global business.

Connected Cars

Connected carsComic-Driverless-Cars are set to become ever more popular in the coming months. A recent surver revealed that two-thirds of new cars shipped in the US will be connected to the internet. That’s strong growth and it happens for many reasons.

On the supplier side, the auto industry benefits from the big data generated by thousands of connected cars in the real world, while consumers are in thrall to the media, data and applications which are geared specifically to people on the move. During 2016, it’s predicted that automakers will start to push updates and fixes to cars through the internet, which will be a massive change and signal the beginning of the end for mass recalls to deal with a problem.


The surge in the Internet of Things implies more devices are connected to the internet, and this brings with it greater security threats than ever before. Devices can be hacked, controlled remotely and data can be stolen. “As a result, as IoT devices become more common, and as companies become more wary of their vulnerability to data being stolen by hackers, we expect a huge surge in demand for insurance policies that protect against cyber hacks,” claims the report.


On the subject of insurance, the Business Insider Intelligence Report predicts that insurers will rely more and more on IoT to minimize their risk and inform their decision making.


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

In 2015, insurers used IoT to track the driving habits of those they insured, and were extremely pleased with the results. You can expect the same sort of data-driven research from insurers when it comes to homes, offices, and even personal health data through devices such as FitBit and Apple Health.

Big data and the internet of things are going to have a profound impact on the insurance industry, and all the signs are that this change is already underway.

Oil Efficiency 

The collapse in the oil price during the last year has meant a major shakeup for oil producers around the globe. Producers don’t expect much of a recovery this year. As a result, maximizing efficiency has become a watchword for the industry. “We believe many of them will utilize IoT devices and analytics systems throughout the oil supply chain (upstream, midstream, and downstream) to improve their profits.”

By Jeremy Daniel

The Evolution Of The Connected Cloud

The Evolution Of The Connected Cloud

The Connected Cloud

Cloud computing is interesting first, but not only, because of the prevalence of cloud projects. There are many of them launched every day. Some have lofty expectations for business benefits (cost saving of 20 percent or more) and others carry even more intriguing goals.

In 2005 “the cloud” was new. Shared computing services were a novel idea. People weren’t sure they would catch on. There were many concerns about the initial reality of cloud, but the big one was security. Many business owners felt that cloud computing wouldn’t be as secure as their on-site system was.  Yet, from a purely tactical perspective, that wasn’t always the case. In fact, knowing where something is makes it more vulnerable than something with an unknown location.

The Community Cloud

The cloud ended up catching on, and eventually became an accepted reality. What may be coming, however, changes the cloud forever. There are US Government Agencies that have put two to four—or even more—petabytes of information into dedicated cloud solutions. “Dedicated cloud,” in this case means the community cloud as defined by NIST. In this case, there are multiple organizations using the resources, but they are all from the same group or agency. This makes having their data shared in a cloud less risky. There are also agencies that have data that gets leveraged around the world—for instance, the National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration (NOAA) and the United States Geological Survey Agency (USGS). Data these organizations generate is concrete: we know when there is an earthquake (you feel the earth move under your feet) and we all know what the weather is outside. Of course, these agencies do produce and generate more data than that, all of which is shared with various groups around the world.


Soon, however, there is a change coming to cloud computing. The concept of cloud service providers is going to change, with the advent and inclusion of data from Cyber Physical Systems (CPS), sometimes called the Internet of Things (IoT). Today, IoT devices produce more data that virtually every other producing system. Most of the data they produce isn’t used or even noticed. For example a remote thermite monitoring a specific location (say a volcano) publishes the temperature 4 times a minute or more than 5760 times in a day. We can discard the majority of those data points because they are not significant. If it is 82 degrees 10 miles from the volcano and 81 degrees on the volcano, that data is not useful or unique. Estimates place the volume of CPS/IoT generated data at around 110 zB today. Experts project that in less than 5 years there will be roughly 5 times as many CPS/IoT devices deployed.

As we get smarter, though, the sensors we deploy will produce more intelligent data. For example, that volcano thermometer may stop sending 5700 pieces of information and only send information when there is a significant change. The group that placed that sensor will be able to determine what “significant” means. For instance, with a volcano, you don’t care if it is suddenly 20 degrees colder at night. You do care if the temperature rises above the air temperature, even if that rise isn’t sudden. The concept of CPS/IoT device intelligence will reduce a lot of the overall data produced. That 5700 messages a day/35000 messages in a week may drop to 1.

The Cloud Future


(Infographic Image Source: Intel)

The future of cloud is in the transportation, manufacturing, analysis and consumption of CPS/IoT produced information.

Yes, cloud will continue to provide computing services and storage, as more and more of its overall capacity will be consumed by CPS/IoT data. The rise of intelligent sensors will keep the amount of data flow at a lower level than the increase in the number of CPS/IoT devices would suggest. But even intelligent sensors will have to check-in from time to time, sometimes simply to validate that the connection is still viable and working. The more critical the sensor the more frequently it will need to check-in. This won’t result in 35000 data points a week, but it will still produce some.

The Next Big Thing


(Image Source: Shutterstock)

The next big thing in cloud computing will be the hosting of billions of little things—or, actually, the data from billions of little things. Analyzing and compiling all that information will also change how the cloud is consumed by companies, governments, and individuals. There will need to be a throttle that pays attention to the data you are requesting, and a pipeline for getting you that data. Intelligent sensors will produce smart controlled data. Intelligent cloud solutions will allow the device connecting to receive the amount of data it can process effectively, so as not to drown the messenger in data.

The new cloud will be just like the old cloud, just doing new things a little differently.

By Scott Andersen

Is Fear Holding Back a Next Generation of Cyber Security Approaches?

Is Fear Holding Back a Next Generation of Cyber Security Approaches?

Next Generation of Cyber Security

As I walked through RSA last week, I was struck by the usual fear laden messages “You’re not safe and never will be but I (vendor) have a silver bullet that will protect you.” And, I wondered if this fear-based approach is deterring a badly needed next generation of cyber security approaches.

For as long as I have been in the security industry, the focus has been on selling fear and today that fear is firmly anchored around cyber attacks and what could happen when attackers compromise your network and get a hold of your data. As much as the specter of cyber attacks is real the paranoia and hysteria that accompanies it often gets in the way of finding real solutions. While there were some new and innovative technologies on show at RSA this year, many vendors are still touting yesteryear technologies and approaches.

Expanding Data Networks


In the workplace, digitization has changed how we work – it goes beyond the devices we use and where and when we work, and more to the tools and data and our interactions with a expanding networks of people and data. Yet, despite the fear around security breaches, there are few security approaches that truly focus on securing at the data layer with a contextual focus on people and the expanding number of applications in use today.

Digitization increasingly shapes our everyday lives. It’s changed how we manage our personal finances and how we form networks and connect with people socially. Yet despite much media hype around increasing cybercrime, approaches to staying safe online are seem lax compared to the precautions that people might take with their physical safety. For example, parents who would not leave their children unsupervised while outdoors will let young children play on Internet-connected tablet devices, without adequate safety precautions, potentially putting their children at risk at being exposed and in the longer term being exploited online.

So how do we usher in a next generation of cyber security approaches

  • Children need online safety programs as part of their curriculum. And, to do this successfully, requires that resources also be injected into teacher training and awareness of where to focus and how to make cyber security enticing.
  • Parents and families need to get involved. A key finding from a recent study Addressing Gender Gaps in Teens Cyber Security and Self Efficacy was that teen girls were likely to develop confidence and interest in cybersecurity through informal approaches. It’s a great opportunity for cybersecurity practitioners to become role models and mentors to a younger generation.
  • I noted earlier that many cyber security approaches lag as much as 10 years behind the business landscape. Overhauling industry approaches is difficult when approaches and toolsets have been in use for decades. That’s where reverse mentoring can play a role. Partnering with young people is not just about them learning from us; it’s about what we can learn from them.
  • It’s time to finally drop the fear-based messaging. That would help us focus on what really needs to be fixed versus exploiting fear.

By Evelyn de Souza

CloudTweaks Comics
Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

Cloud Infographic – DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms

DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms Above DDoS attacks, unauthorized access and false alarms, malware is the most common incident that security teams reported responding to in 2014, according to a recent survey from SANS Institute and late-stage security startup AlienVault. The average cost of a data breach? $3.5 million, or $145 per sensitive…

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Cloud Infographic: Security And DDoS

Security, Security, Security!! Get use to it as we’ll be hearing more and more of this in the coming years. Collaborative security efforts from around the world must start as sometimes it feels there is a sense of Fait Accompli, that it’s simply too late to feel safe in this digital age. We may not…

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

The DDoS That Came Through IoT: A New Era For Cyber Crime

A New Era for Cyber Crime Last September, the website of a well-known security journalist was hit by a massive DDoS attack. The site’s host stated it was the largest attack of that type they had ever seen. Rather than originating at an identifiable location, the attack seemed to come from everywhere, and it seemed…

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

A New CCTV Nightmare: Botnets And DDoS attacks

Botnets and DDoS Attacks There’s just so much that seems as though it could go wrong with closed-circuit television cameras, a.k.a. video surveillance. With an ever-increasing number of digital eyes on the average person at all times, people can hardly be blamed for feeling like they’re one misfortune away from joining the ranks of Don’t…

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Ending The Great Enterprise Disconnect

Five Requirements for Supporting a Connected Workforce It used to be that enterprises dictated how workers spent their day: stuck in a cubicle, tied to an enterprise-mandated computer, an enterprise-mandated desk phone with mysterious buttons, and perhaps an enterprise-mandated mobile phone if they traveled. All that is history. Today, a modern workforce is dictating how…

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

How The CFAA Ruling Affects Individuals And Password-Sharing

Individuals and Password-Sharing With the 1980s came the explosion of computing. In 1980, the Commodore ushered in the advent of home computing. Time magazine declared 1982 was “The Year of the Computer.” By 1983, there were an estimated 10 million personal computers in the United States alone. As soon as computers became popular, the federal government…

Why Security Practitioners Need To Apply The 80-20 Rules To Data Security

Why Security Practitioners Need To Apply The 80-20 Rules To Data Security

The 80-20 Rule For Security Practitioners  Everyday we learn about yet another egregious data security breach, exposure of customer data or misuse of data. It begs the question why in this 21st century, as a security industry we cannot seem to secure our most valuable data assets when technology has surpassed our expectations in other regards.…

The Cancer Moonshot: Collaboration Is Key

The Cancer Moonshot: Collaboration Is Key

Cancer Moonshot In his final State of the Union address in January 2016, President Obama announced a new American “moonshot” effort: finding a cure for cancer. The term “moonshot” comes from one of America’s greatest achievements, the moon landing. If the scientific community can achieve that kind of feat, then surely it can rally around…

Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Are Cloud Solutions Secure Enough Out-of-the-box?

Out-of-the-box Cloud Solutions Although people may argue that data is not safe in the Cloud because using cloud infrastructure requires trusting another party to look after mission critical data, cloud services actually are more secure than legacy systems. In fact, a recent study on the state of cloud security in the enterprise market revealed that…

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Picking Up – Legacy Security Losing Ground

Cloud Native Trends Once upon a time, only a select few companies like Google and Salesforce possessed the knowledge and expertise to operate efficient cloud infrastructure and applications. Organizations patronizing those companies benefitted with apps that offered new benefits in flexibility, scalability and cost effectiveness. These days, the sharp division between cloud and on-premises infrastructure…

5% Of Companies Have Embraced The Digital Innovation Fostered By Cloud Computing

5% Of Companies Have Embraced The Digital Innovation Fostered By Cloud Computing

Embracing The Cloud We love the stories of big complacent industry leaders having their positions sledge hammered by nimble cloud-based competitors. chews up Oracle’s CRM business. Airbnb has a bigger market cap than Marriott. Amazon crushes Walmart (and pretty much every other retailer). We say: “How could they have not seen this coming?” But, more…

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Four Recurring Revenue Imperatives

Revenue Imperatives “Follow the money” is always a good piece of advice, but in today’s recurring revenue-driven market, “follow the customer” may be more powerful. Two recurring revenue imperatives highlight the importance of responding to, and cherishing customer interactions. Technology and competitive advantage influence the final two. If you’re part of the movement towards recurring…


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